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Course Catalog

Art and Art History

The Department of Art and Art History offers courses of instruction in the studio arts, history of art and art education. Students may elect majors or minors in studio art and art history. Studio courses (in drawing, painting, ceramics, sculpture, photography, video and digital art) stress the fundamentals of visual communication and help students cultivate the technical skills necessary for the effective expression of their ideas in a given medium. Art history courses combine traditional and non-traditional approaches to the study of art, past and present, and stress the importance of viewing visual artifacts and architecture within their social and cultural contexts. Students are encouraged to look at art in an active and engaged way and to think critically about the meaning of art and visual culture in the contemporary world. Both programs, studio and art history, prepare students for graduate programs or entry into a wide variety of professional careers in the arts. Studio majors in the department have gone on to successful careers as practicing artists, commercial illustrators and art educators; those with majors in art history have become art critics, art historians, museum or gallery professionals or arts administrators. Every year, in addition to the usual courses of study, the art and art history department sponsors a number of cultural events that connect the department to the campus at large. The Art Center's three large gallery spaces provide a changing schedule of 10-12 exhibitions annually; visiting artists, critics and historians present their own work and meet with students for critiques and discussions; department faculty and students get together for group critiques and the annual major-minor mixer, and the department sponsors a popular bus trip each semester to visit museums and galleries in Chicago, St. Louis, or Cincinnati.


Requirements for a major

Art History (declared after January 1, 2013)

Total courses required Eight + 2 (see below)
Core courses Any two 100 level courses (ARTH 131,ARTH 132, ARTH 133, ARTH 134, or ARTH 142), and ARTH 494. Students cannot receive credit for both ARTH 132 and ARTH 142.
Other required courses At least one course from each of the three groups below, A, B, and C, so as to work across chronological and geographical boundaries within art history:
  • Group A--European Art before 1500: ARTH218, ARTH235, ARTH340, ARTH350;
  • Group B--European and American Art after 1500: ARTH201, ARTH225, ARTH226, ARTH240, ARTH250, ARTH266, ARTH302, ARTH326, ARTH330, ARTH336;
  • Group C--Asian Art: ARTH231, ARTH232, ARTH233, ARTH 234, ARTH331, ARTH332, ARTH333, ARTH 334.
Number 300 and 400 level courses Three: two 300 level courses plus ARTH 494
Senior requirement and capstone experience The senior comprehensive requirement consists of the completion of ARTH 494 with a grade of C-­ or better, as well as a thesis. The course reviews the major methodologies of art history, through reading and discussion of landmark articles in the field, and initiates students in their application. A major original research paper, on a topic of the student's choosing, is done under the direction of the instructor. The results of the research are presented in a formal twenty-­minute public lecture at the end of the semester.
Additional information Additional information: In addition to the eight art history courses, art history majors also must take two courses in cognate fields, one of which is to be chosen from the following: ASIA 140, ASIA 281, CLST 100, CLST 262, CLST 263, CLST 264, ENG 261, ENG 281, HIST 107, HIST 108, HIST 111, HIST 112, PHIL 240, REL 130, REL 130E, REL 132. The other course must be chosen from among the studio courses (any studio course). First-­year seminars on art historical topics may be counted toward an art history major or minor.
Writing in the Major The following courses provide the opportunity to satisfy the writing in the art history major requirement:
  • ARTH 310: Painting and Presence: Image Theory in Late Medieval Art
  • ARTH 327: Parisian Avant-Gardes: Matisse, Picasso, Braque
  • ARTH 330: Van Gogh, Gauguin, and Post Impressionism
  • ARTH 334: Women and East Asian Art

In order to satisfy the writing in the major requirement in one of these courses, the student will produce a satisfactory 10-12 pp. paper reflective of the disciplinary standards of art history, and which meets the following requirements: the effective marshaling of evidence in support of a compelling thesis; a methodological framework; critical use of original sources; interdisciplinary bibliography; Chicago Style footnotes.

Art History (declared prior to January 1, 2013)

Total courses required Eight + 2 (see below)
Core courses ARTH 131, either ARTH 132 or ARTH 142, and ARTH 494
Other required courses One course (not including 131), which covers pre-Renaissance material, chosen from the following: ARTH 218, ARTH 235, ARTH 340.
Number 300 and 400 level courses Three including ARTH 494
Senior requirement and capstone experience The senior comprehensive requirement consists of the completion of ARTH 494 with a grade of C- or better, as well as a thesis. The course reviews the major methodologies of art history, through reading and discussion of landmark articles in the field, and initiates students in their application. A major original research paper, on a topic of the student's choosing, is done under the direction of the instructor. The results of the research are presented in a formal twenty-minute public lecture at the end of the semester.
Additional information In addition to the eight art history courses, art history majors also must take two courses in cognate fields, one of which is to be chosen from the following: CLST 100, CLST 262, CLST 263, CLST 264, PHIL 214, REL 132, HIST 111, HIST 112. The other course must be chosen from among the studio courses (any studio course). It is recommended that art history majors take at least one course in each of the following four time periods: Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque and 19th Century/Modern. First-year seminars on art historical topics may be counted toward an art history major or minor.

Studio Art

Total courses required Nine + 2 Art History
Core courses Three introductory courses--one from each of the following categories:
  • painting/drawing : ARTS 152, ARTS 153
  • sculpture/ceramics: ARTS 175, ARTS 170
  • photo/new media: ARTS 160, ARTS 163, ARTS 165

And Senior Projects: ARTS 491, ARTS 492

Other required courses Four additional studio art courses at the 200 or 300-level, at least one of which must be at the 300-level. Two art history courses, one survey (ARTH 131, ARTH 132, ARTH 133, ARTH 142) and one upper level course (ARTH 226 (particularly recommended), ARTH 250, ARTH 326, ARTH 225)
Number 300 and 400 level courses Three including ARTS 491 and ARTS 492
Senior requirement and capstone experience The senior comprehensive requirement consists of the completion of ARTS 491, Senior Projects (fall semester senior year) and ARTS 492, Senior Projects (spring semester senior year) with a grade of C or better, and an exhibition of the student's work at the end of the senior year. Throughout this two seminar sequence, students will review the major methodologies of studio art practice through sustained exploration of ideas, continued experimentation with materials and techniques, ongoing critiques with faculty and peers and the development of a professional artist's packet. Examples of contemporary art practice will be investigated though lectures, readings, research presentations and museum visits. At the end of spring semester, students will present a cohesive, conceptually focused body of work for exhibition and a formal gallery talk at the opening reception in the Visual Arts Gallery.
Recent changes in major Effective for students entering Fall 2010 and as an option for students entering before: The number of required 100-level introductory courses is decreased from 4 to 3 and the number of 200 & 300 level courses increased to 4. Both ARTS 491 and 492 are now required.
Writing in the Major

In order to fulfill the writing in the major requirement, studio art majors enrolled in ARTS 491 will write a two to three page research-based artist statement in conversation with the artwork they are producing in their studios. Students will identify and research artistic influences as related to their studio practice, as well as contextualize that practice within art history and contemporary cultural concerns. The ideas that students explore through this writing requirement will be informed by and influence the public presentation of their artwork, which regularly happens through verbal critique and artist talks.


Requirements for a minor

Art History (declared after Jan. 1, 2013)

Total courses required Five
Core courses Four art history courses, one of which must be ARTH 131, ARTH 132, ARTH 133, ARTH 134, or ARTH 142, and one studio art course. Students cannot receive credit for both ARTH 132 and ARTH 142.
Other required courses Of the three non-introductory art history courses, one course must be taken from each of the three groups above, A, B, and C. Students considering a minor in art history should consult with the department by the end of the sophomore year.
Number 300 and 400 level courses One

Art History (declared prior to Jan. 1, 2013)

Total courses required Five
Core courses Four art history courses, one of which must be ARTH 131, ARTH 132 or ARTH 142, and one studio art course
Other required courses Of the three non-introductory art history courses, one must cover the pre-Renaissance material (ARTH 212, 218, 232, 235, 332), and another must cover art of the Renaissance or later (ARTH 201, 225, 240, 302, 310, 326, 330, 336, 342).

Students considering a minor in art history should consult with the department by the end of the sophomore year.

Number 300 and 400 level courses One

Studio Art

Total courses required Four + one Art History
Core courses Four studio courses. At least one 300/400 level studio course is required for all minors. Students should contact their minor advisor to enroll in a 300-level course.
Other required courses One course in Art History.
Number 300 and 400 level courses One

Courses in Art History

ARTH 131

Introduction to Art History Ancient to Medieval

This course surveys the major developments in art and architecture from the Paleolithic period through the high Middle Ages. Emphasis falls on the ancient civilizations of the Near East, Egypt, the Aegean, Greece and Rome, the early Christian world, Byzantium, Islam and the Middle Ages in Western Europe. The approach is at once historical, in that visual forms and types of images are studied in their development over time and across cultures, and anthropological, in the sense that cultures are studied at isolated moments as a way of better understanding the significant roles art and architecture play within them. May count towards European Studies minor.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTH 132

Introduction to Art History Renaissance to Modern

A survey of Western Art from the early Italian Renaissance to modern and contemporary art. We will view and discuss the major works of art from this period in chronological sequence, discussing their place in the larger historical developments of the west, including the political, social, economic, philosophical and theological. We will also discuss and practice some basic modes of art historical analysis. May count towards European Studies minor. Not open to students with credit in ARTH 142.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTH 133

East Asian Art Survey I

The first half of a 2-semester survey of East Asian Art (from 1500 B.C.E. to the 14th century) analyzing the major developments in the art and architecture of China, Japan, and Korea over a range of media. We will study some of the various methodologies that can be applied to East Asian Art as well as key themes in the chronological and historical development of visual cultures against the background of political, social, and cultural contexts. Cross-listed with Asian Studies.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTH 134

Art of India

(formerly ARTH 216) Art and architecture of India and Pakistan, also Afghanistan, Cambodia, 250 BC to the present. Concentrates on sacred art (Buddhism, Jainism, Hinduism, Islam): sculpture and architecture and some painting, also modern (postcolonial) and contemporary art, architecture, and especially film. Theological, economic, political and historical conditions will be considered. Develop a critical and formal vocabulary for the major art forms reviewed (sculpture, architecture, painting and film), and develop an understanding of different artistic styles, schools, and traditions, as well as their specific religious, political and cultural contexts.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTH 135

East Asian Art Survey II

The second half of a 2-semester survey of East Asian Art (from the 14th century to the present) analyzing the major developments in the art and architecture of China, Japan, and Korea over a range of media. We will study some of the various methodologies that can be applied to East Asian Art as well as key themes in the chronological and historical development of visual cultures against the background of political, social, and cultural contexts. Cross-listed with Asian Studies.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTH 142

Visual Encounters: Critical Approaches to Representation

What is art? Why is it important? How and what do works of art mean? How does art help us both shape and make sense of our world? These are the overarching questions that the course will address as we thread our way through the examination of various genres of art--from traditional (landscape, portraiture) to contemporary (video, performance art); as we explore art in its economic, social and political dimensions (looking, for example, at public art and identity politics or at controversial art and the First Amendment); and as we examine the role art can play in our public and private consciousness. We will be mindful throughout of how the production of meaning in art involves a complex collaboration of artist, viewers and artwork. In this discussion-based course, we will be active viewers and analytical thinkers--reading, writing and looking, in a critical way, at images in slides, at actual works of art, and at films and videos. Not open to students with credit in ARTH 132.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTH 197

First-Year Seminar

A seminar focused on a theme related to the study of art history. Open only to first-year students.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ARTH 201

Baroque Art: The Age of the Marvelous

The course introduces the major painters and sculptors (Rembrandt, Rubens, Vermeer, Caravaggio, Bernini, Artemisia Gentileschi, Velazquez and others) of 17th-century Europe by exploring a few major themes. Using, as an overarching concept, the Baroque as the "Age of the Marvelous" allows us to view intersections among the worlds of art, science, theater, printing, mechanical engineering, religion and the occult. The course examines the visual arts in relation to various contexts--economic, historic and domestic--as well as institutions--the Church, the monarchy and academies of art. It investigates the development of certain subjects that emerged as independent genres in the 17th century: still life, landscape and genre painting. The course also looks at how artists perceived themselves and were perceived (some would say "constructed") both by their contemporaries and by subsequent writers up to the present day. May count towards European Studies minor.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTH 218

Cathedral and Court: Gothic Art

This course explores the spectacular visual culture of European society during the High and Late Middle Ages (roughly 12th-15th centuries). In this period the tremendous growth of cities and urban culture, along with economic expansion and social differentiation, created dynamic new forms of interaction between audiences and emerging genres of art.Through selected case studies of architecture, monumental sculpture, stained glass, reliquaries and altar pieces, illuminated manuscripts, luxury ivory carvings and other devotional images (including early graphic arts), students encounter medieval culture and society in all its dazzling diversity.Issues for investigation include: the rise of devotional art and lay spirituality; the impact of miracle tales, relic cults, pilgrimage and other forms of associational worship; the rise of the cult of the Virgin, Mary's role as heavenly intercessor, bridal mysticism and devotion to the Rosary; the culture of chivalry, the impact of the crusades and epic poetry; new forms of social violence, crime and punishment, as well as new models of sexuality and love. May count towards European Studies minor.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTH 225

Modern Art and Modernity

Surveys the history of European and American art of the late 19th and first half of the 20th century, paying attention to changes in the artists' goals and understanding of what art is, as well as changes in materials, subject matter, audience and marketing. Some topics covered are: non-naturalistic representation and abstraction; rejection of traditional standards of quality and beauty; the role of the artist in society; mass culture and politics; issues of gender; colonialism; ideals of sincerity and authenticity as they motivated artists and their audiences.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTH 226

Contemporary Art & Theory

This course will be focused on art from the late 1960s to the present. This is the tradition in art which rejects many of the basic principles and qualities of Modernism; that is, it rejects an exclusive focus on oil painting and pedestal-based sculpture, the autonomy of the artwork from the wider world, and the ideal of the artist as a larger-than-life person who reaches a level of personal emotional or spiritual insight, turning that insight into a cultural achievement, in painting or sculpture, beyond the abilities of ordinary mortals. We will examine how this new tradition, critical of the earlier era of Modernism, emerged and developed, and how it still essentially defines the agenda of today's art world. We will address the crucial question: Is the rejection of those earlier ideals and goals in contemporary art a liberation or a defeat? We will also address the situation in contemporary art, the direct result of that rejection, in which art takes on a bewildering array of materials, methods, procedures, goals, and modes of self-presentation; rarely does one see in contemporary art exhibitions a simple framed painting, hanging on the wall, unless it is presented with exquisite irony and ambivalence. Not open to students with credit in ARTH 342, Art Theory and Criticism.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTH 231

Urban Art of Early Modern Japan

This course explores the spectacle and complexity of Japanese urban life in the early modern period through a study of the era's visual arts, particularly woodblock prints and paintings or ukiyo-e. Investigation of ukiyo-e yields a rich tapestry of issues and topics relevant to "early modernity." We will consider the economic currents of the time, the wealth of the commoner class as well as the concomitant blurring of social boundaries, government attempts at control, the powerful entertainment industries of theatre & sex, the visualization of urban literature, concepts of beauty, the "burden" of history, and the supernatural. Our interdisciplinary approach will allow us to engage with not only art-historical issues, but also literary, sociological, historical, and religious concerns.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTH 232

Warrior Art of Japan: Shoguns & Daimyo

This course explores the arts produced for and by the warrior elite of Japan from 1185 until 1868. From the tragic tale of Minamoto Yoshitsune to the dog-loving Tokugawa Tsunayoshi, the class will concentrate on the arts produced for the men who led the nation through both treacherous and prosperous times. We will study arms & armor, castles & retreat pavilions, the tea ceremony, paintings, Noh theatre and film. Through a careful consideration of translated documents, slide reproductions of art objects, movies, and selected treasures from the DePauw University Art Collection, students will learn about what motivated these powerful men to produce art, how they embraced the arts to better themselves culturally, and what these monuments and artworks conveyed about the culture of Japan's medieval and early modern eras.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTH 233

Monumental Art of Japan, 1550-1900: Splendor & Angst

This course explores large-scale art and architecture produced in Japan from 1550 to 1900. These years encompass the last turbulent decades of warfare and the first two centuries of an era of peace, witnessing the construction (and destruction) of resplendent castles, villas, religious complexes, and their accompanying interior decoration. Powerful and pervasive artistic ateliers, which were responsible for the decoration of these structures, also left an indelible artistic stamp on the nation during this period. What role did such resplendent monuments play in the struggle for power, both politically and culturally? For whose eyes was such splendor intended and what hidden, underlying angst pervades these efforts? What aesthetic values are expressed and did they extend beyond the elite, ruling class? Students will consider these questions and more, ultimately investigating the larger role of "art" in society.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTH 234

East West Encounters

This course examines cross-cultural artistic encounters between the Western world (Europe and the United States) and Asia (India, China, and Japan) from ca. 1500 to the mid-twentieth century, concentrating on the role of art objects and visual culture, broadly speaking, in the cultural exchange between East and West over the past five hundred years. Topics include the impact of Western realism on traditional Asian art forms; the role of commodities and empire in artistic production; Japonisme and Chinoiserie in 19th century Europe and America; early photography; collections of Asian art objects in the West; issues of cultural identity in Asian modernism; and post-World War II abstract art.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities None 1 course

ARTH 235

Women and Medieval Art

What was the role of images in women's experience in the Middle Ages? This course seeks to answer that question through an examination of images made of, for and by women in this dynamic period of history. The course is framed by the legalization of Christianity (in 313) and Luther's declaration of Protestantism (in 1517), thereby focusing on the entire medieval tradition and its exploration of gender and image. The course seeks to understand the construction and subversion of gender roles through images. May count towards Women's Studies and European Studies minors.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTH 240

Rome: City and Myth

This interdisciplinary course is organized both chronologically and thematically. It covers the period from the Renaissance to Fascism with ancient Rome being an overarching theme, since antiquity (its physical remains, how it was mythologized, conceptualized and fantasized in history, literature, travel writing and film) has been so integral to Roman identity through time and so much a part of the fabric of how others have conceptualized Rome as well. In dealing with Rome as a material entity, we cover primarily architecture, public sculpture and urban planning which were all driven by complex political, social, religious and aesthetic motivations that got encoded in the imagery. In dealing with Rome as an accumulation of 'mythic' narratives about the city, we look at poetry, short stories, novels, films, letters, journals and other forms of travel writing -- created by some of the many footloose pilgrims -- men and women of different time periods and nationalities--some famous and some not --who have journeyed to Rome and been forever changed by the experience. The 'real' and the 'mythic' Romes are, in the end, impossible to pry apart, so interwoven is the dream of this urban landscape with its material reality. May count towards European Studies minor.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTH 250

Documentary Film

This discussion-based course is structured thematically around such topics as representations of the family, subjectivity and selfhood, crime and justice, sexuality, trauma, and war propaganda. We view a wide variety of documentary styles: poetic, ethnographic, direct cinema, government sponsored, social advocacy, rockumentary, mockumentary, pseudo-documentary, and different hybrid forms. These styles and themes are used as springboards to explore larger questions: What is the source of our fascination with the real? How can documentary evoke discourses of truth, realism and authenticity when the boundaries between fiction and non-fiction have become ever more fluid; when digital technology makes possible the absence of any camera or original referent from the "real" world; and when documentarians make use of strategies such as staging, re-enactments, discontinuous editing, or various poetic devices? What are the conventions of documentary film practice, that provide the necessary impression of "authenticity;" when and for what purposes have these conventions been challenged? What is the ethical responsibility of a filmmaker to his/her subjects who are, after all, not actors, but people going about the business of their lives? To understand better the complex nature of representation, we also take into account how context, expectations, institutional supports, viewing communities, cultural frameworks, and historical and social forces (and their interaction) all contribute to the making of meaning in visual images.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTH 260

Time/Space/Memory

This course casts a wide but selective net over a vast amount of material that allows us to explore the nature, meanings, functions and experiences of time and its intersections with space and memory across an array of disciplines and media: philosophy, science, film, poetry, fiction, graphic novels, sculpture, painting, performance art, photography and video. We begin by examining the different ways some of the greatest thinkers in the West (Aristotle, Augustine, Newton and Einstein) grappled with the notion of time. We look at how time has been marked, recorded and performed and at the impact technological developments (timeclocks, uniform railway timetables, wireless telegraphy, motion studies in industry) have had on human history. We examine such questions as, how is time related to memory in the context of families, communities and nations? How do we commemorate the past and what are the ethics of this value-laden process of reconstructing history? What do we choose to remember and what do we choose to forget as multiple stories about the past contend for recognition? We also consider the problematic relationship between time and photography. What is the role of time and memory in collective and private identity formation and how does photography contribute to this process? We discuss how time is differently lived, perceived and represented as we also examine how time and its manipulation (the different ways it is used to shape content or structure or both) in film, literature and art is an active agent that can powerfully affect our process of meaning-making and our reading and viewing practices.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTH 266

Savage and Surreal: Modernism's Wild Years in Paris

Picasso once said that he and his friend the painter Georges Braque had been like two mountain climbers in the first days of Cubism, roped together as they progressed, step by step, to the summit of modernist painting's accomplishment in Paris in the early years of the 20th century. He meant that they had worked closely together and had by turns taken the lead in their great discoveries, but also that they had challenged each other to take dizzying risks, going where none had been before, and that they had been alone up there, with nobody to rely on but themselves. In the years before and after the First World War, avant-garde artists in Paris demolished the limits of painting, first the limits of color, with the Fauves or "Wild Beasts," then the limits of perspective and the picture plane, with the Cubists, and finally the limits of painting itself, with the Surrealists, who even demolished the limits of rational thought. In this course we examine this adventure story of modern art, through artworks, original texts and recent scholarship, in the political and social context of France in the early 20th century with its conflicts about national identity, colonial empire, and cultural heritage. We also discuss how and why artists explored issues of gender and racial identity through formal innovations of color, composition, and materials.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTH 290

Topics in The History of Art

An in-depth study of a particular topic in the history of art. It may be an examination of a specific artist, group or movement or an exploration of a particular theme or issue in art.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTH 302

Italian Renaissance Art

The course explores developments in the visual arts (primarily painting and sculpture) in 15th-and 16th-century Italy and includes such artists as Masaccio, Donatello, Sofonisba Anguissola, Botticelli, Leonardo and Michelangelo. It is partly a chronological survey and partly a thematic exploration of important issues--the social construction of the artist; the concept of humanism and its effect on creative developments; the problems of Renaissance historiography; the question of whether or not women had a Renaissance. The class is also concerned with the presuppositions on which art historians have based their interpretations of Renaissance art and culture and on the methods that they have applied to support these presuppositions. Emphasis is on primary readings. Class sessions will be mostly discussion. May count towards European Studies minor.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTH 310

Painting & Presence: Image Theory in Medieval Art

This course examines the changes and controversies that informed the theory of the late medieval image (1400-1550) in altarpieces and devotional panels, and books of hours. In manifesting the presence of the divine, painting existed at the boundaries of the material and the immaterial, the earthly and the divine, the two-dimensional and three-dimensional, the visible and the invisible. How were these boundaries negotiated by the makers of images? And by their viewers? Study of original sources that theorize image making in conjunction with contemporary art historical scholarship will shape our discussions of how images come to be and how they come to mean. In focusing on the late medieval art of Jan van Eyck, Rogier van der Weyden, Robert Campin and their contemporaries, we will seek to understand the impact of new materials and techniques (oil painting, multiple point perspective), as well as new iconography (The Seven Joys of Mary, the Wound of Christ), new ways of seeing (realism, symbolic and otherwise), and new identities (the new prominence of the artist through signature and commissioned work. The fundamental questions of the course are: 'How does painting create presence?' and 'What are the consequences ofthis creation?' This course counts towards the WIM (Writing in the Major) requirement of the department. May count towards European Studies minor.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTH 326

Abstract vs. Figurative Painting

Explores origins and developments of abstract painting. Look at, interpret, discuss, and differentiate between different kinds of abstract painting. Is it possible to recognize or find meaning in abstract art, and do different styles of abstraction mean different things? Is it possible to distinguish between good and bad abstract art? Is abstract painting a secret code, an exploration of design ideas and painting techniques, a record of an artist's interior life, or a blank slate onto which we project our own ideas? What is the relationship between abstract painting and the political and social upheavals of the 20th century? May count towards European Studies minor.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ARTH 330

Van Gogh, Gauguin and "Post Impressionism"

This course considers how art historians have conceptualized "Post Impressionism" and explores the institutions (Academy, Salon, Ecole des Beaux Arts) and market structure (dealers, auction houses, the apparatus of art criticism) that influenced or controlled how, for whom and under what conditions art in 19th- century France was produced and how, where and by whom art was consumed (that is, used, purchased or viewed). Other issues considered are the social and financial consequences of the artists' independence from traditional institutions in 19th-century France and how women artists did or did not fit into these institutional and market structures. The "Post Impressionist" artists studied will be used as springboards to discuss some larger themes about art, artists, critics and audiences in a particular historical moment. Readings include primary sources--artists' letters, journals, excerpts from contemporary novels and art criticism from specialized and mainstream journals of the late 19th-century. May count towards European Studies minor.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ARTH 331

Kyoto: A Cultural Metropolis

This course examines the rich visual culture of Kyoto, the imperial capital of Japan from 794 until 1868. During its long history, the city witnessed astounding growth, cultural flowering first under the emperors and then under various warlords, devastation by wars, fires, and famine, and multiple rebirths. Kyoto presided over some of the nation's greatest artistic achievements including the construction of sumptuous palaces, get-away villas, grand temples, and the production of the paintings and decorative flourishes within these structures. In the early modern period, Kyoto silk weavers, lacquer-ware specialists, book illustrators, calligraphers, and especially, painters commanded the respect of consumers throughout Japan, spreading Kyoto's artistic "style" to other urban centers and to the villages at the peripheries of power. The class will proceed chronologically, beginning with the founding of the city in 794 and ending with the city's role in the restoration of imperial power in 1868. Each week we will focus on specific case studies, monuments, art objects, illustrated works of literature, and maps, as well as translated primary sources and pertinent studies by art historians of Japan. Besides gaining a familiarity with Kyoto's pre-modern visual culture, the class aims to impart an awareness of Kyoto's role in the formation of Japanese 'nationhood' and national identity.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTH 332

Representation in Japanese Visual Culture

This course examines the concept of "representation" in Japanese visual culture, engaging with subject matter from contemporary times, as well as from Japan's modern and pre-modern periods (12th through the early 20th centuries). We will proceed along thematic lines. Balancing theoretical readings with scholarly articles and a sprinkling of translated primary sources, the class will address issues relating to the representation (or re-presentation) of landscape and the environment, the body and gender roles, canonical narratives as performance, and national identity at three crucial periods in Japan's history. At times we will reference Japanese monuments and works of art produced prior to the early modern era, as well as the Chinese sources that influenced some of the Japanese topics at the locus of our investigation. What lies at the heart of representation--subjectivity, political aims, societal concerns, emotional responses--and the complexity this question reveals are the central concerns of this course.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTH 333

The Supernatural in Japanese Art

This course explores the theme of the supernatural in Japanese visual culture from the 12th century to the present. With origins in religion, folklore, and literature, otherworldly creatures and their powers have captured the imagination of the Japanese and consequently inspired creative visualizations of them. Students will not only analyze works ranging from traditional painting mediums to contemporary manga, as well as anime, but also will engage with texts that have supernatural worlds and beings as a central element. Moreover, this course will ask students to place these exhilarating and cautionary tales in context: what do these narratives say about the societies that created them, believed in them, and produced visualizations of the supernatural creatures featured within them?

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTH 334

Women and East Asian Art

This course examines the role of women in the arts in pre-modern East Asia and the negotiation of women's concerns, by female artists, in modern and contemporary East Asian art. Did women have no sense of empowerment at all in pre-modern China, Korea, and Japan? What about Chinese, Korean, and Japanese women artists today? What are their interests and agendas? Students will engage with historical works of art and artists, while concurrently gaining an understanding of gendered female roles as determined by religious, philosophical, and societal conceptualizations of the past. Then, students will study feminist discourses originating from the West in their analysis of modern and contemporary East Asian art by and about women. Ultimately, the aim of this course is to demystify and to complicate understandings about women as the subject of art, as well as women as the producers of art, in East Asia.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTH 336

Art and Literature Paris and Berlin

The Paris of the 19th century, of Zola and the Impressionist painters was the city where the large-scale development of new methods of industry, finance, merchandising, government, and culture were given their most coherent concrete form. In the 20th century Berlin was at the center of, successively, German Expressionist painting, the European film industry, Nazism, and the Cold War. These two European capitals were at the intersection of individual personal experience and titanic historical forces. Close examination of painting, novels, film, architecture and urban planning, and the context within which they were produced. May count towards European Studies minor.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ARTH 340

Love and War in Medieval Art and Literature

"Love is a kind of war, and no assignment for cowards." Thus spoke Ovid in c. 2 B.C.E. with great pertinence to love and war in the Middle Ages and to the endeavors of this class. I propose to work with you through three forms of vernacular writing and imagery: war epic poems, Arthurian romances, and allegorical love poetry. All three of these forms were articulated in the incredibly rich 12th - 14th centuries, though often they refer to much earlier periods. All three of these forms flourished outside the purview (and approval) of the Church. And all three of these forms interacted with that most troublesome (because uncontrolled) of all entities: the secular image. Both the texts and images of medieval love and war existed without the sanction or authority of sacred text (i.e. the Bible in its many medieval manifestations). This "unmoored" quality resulted in an especially productive, volatile and fascinating interaction between orality, memory, writing, and transmission. The course seeks to be aware of how "timeless" stories move between various verbal and visual forms, what the impacts of those forms are on the stories, and what happens to them in our modern era (where they are still consistently translated into film and further fiction). May count towards European Studies minor.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTH 345

History of Self-Portraiture

The self-portrait has a long and varied history: part manifesto, part self-expression, part philosophical investigation, the self-portrait invites questions of creativity and identity. How does an artist construct a self-portrait to represent both the self and the artistic project? The answers to this question provoke an examination of the changing uses and transformations of the genre. The course incorporates both original sources written by the artists themselves and scholarly sources contextualizing the artists and their self-portraits. Discussion-based course.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ARTH 350

Monsters and Marvels: Visualizing the Other in Medieval Art

This course seeks to uncover and analyze strategies of difference in the pre-modern years of 1000-1550. Our modern categories of difference and conflict involve race, class and gender: what categories did medieval culture use to mark difference, and what can we learn from them? Starting in northern Europe with the warrior Beowulf's battle against Grendel the monster, moving to Spain and its geopolitics of Convivencia, continuing to the Middle East with the Crusades, and ending in the fantastic maps and travel writings and images of the kingdoms of India, Africa, and China we will study categories of ethnicity, dynastic loyalty, religion, and language, among others, as they constructed difference in medieval textual and visual culture. At stake in this class is a critical understanding of the historical construction of difference, and the lessons it can give us for understanding strategies of difference in our own culture.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1

ARTH 390

Advanced Topics in the History of Art

An independent directed study centered on a specific topic arranged with the instructor.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1/2-1 course

ARTH 494

Art History Seminar

Advanced work in art history. Prerequisite: senior classification and a major in art history.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Senior classification and a major in art history 1 course

Courses in Studio Art

ARTS 152

Introduction to Drawing

Designed for the student with little or no prior drawing experience. This is an introduction to, and the practice of, the fundamental principles of drawing,(i.e., light and shade, perspective, composition, line and form). These basic principles are taught in conjunction with slide lectures and discussions of the drawing ideology of the masters. Not offered pass/fail.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTS 153

Introduction to Painting

Designed for the student with little or no prior oil painting experience. This introduction includes development of a basic understanding of oil painting, color principles, line, form and composition. Principles are taught in conjunction with slide presentations and discussions of the painting ideology of past as well as contemporary masters. Generally it is recommended that students take Drawing I before Painting I. Not offered pass/fail.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTS 160

Introduction to Digital Art

This course investigates software as artistic material and cultural form. Using different platforms and technologies students will gain a tool set of different approaches to begin an art practice in new media/digital art. Students will learn to conceptualize and design their own projects, as well as learn to utilize a variety of software-based art-making strategies in order to resolve these ideas as artworks. No prerequisites are required. Not offered pass/fail.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities No prerequisites 1 course

ARTS 163

Introduction to Photography

An introduction to the art of black-and-white photography, this course provides opportunities for learning personal expression, critical thinking, and the aesthetics of photography through darkroom experiences and camera assignments. A 35-millimeter camera with a manual control is required. Some cameras are available for student checkout. Please see the instructor. Not offered pass/fail.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTS 165

Introduction to Video Art

An introduction to digital video art production through camera and editing assignments. This course includes readings and screenings on contemporary and historical issues surrounding the medium of video art. Not offered pass/fail.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTS 170

Introduction to Sculpture

An introduction to the concepts and technical skills associated with three dimensional media. The class explores the principles of 3D design, such as structure, organic/inorganic forms and spatial relationships. The curriculum introduces these concepts through a series of projects which develop basic technical skills with a through a variety of materials including clay, plaster, steel, paper and wood. Not offered Pass/Fail.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTS 175

Introduction to Ceramics

This course is an introduction to art studio focusing on the use of ceramic materials and techniques. The class covers baic art and design principles, idea development through sketching, experimentation and critique, and a range of ceramic techniques including hand building, press molds, wheel forming and surface development. Not offered pass/fail.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTS 197

First-Year Seminar

A seminar focused on a theme related to the study of studio art. Open only to first-year students.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ARTS 198

Introductory Studio Arts Topics

Introductory level studio courses in specific media. Areas of study may include: A. Drawing, B. Painting, C. Ceramics, D. Sculpture, E. Photography, F. Video, G. Digital, H. Interdisciplinary Study. No prerequisite. Not offered Pass/Fail

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
None 1 course

ARTS 254

Projects in Drawing

Continuing research work in drawing. Students will be introduced to a variety of projects exploring different drawing formats, mediums, and subjects. These projects will rotate each semester and will include traditional and experimental subject matter. Emphasis will be placed on further development of the student's drawing skills, problem solving, critical thinking, visual literacy and student initiated research. Prerequisite: ARTS 152. Course may be taken or repeated at the 300 level with advanced expectations and consent of instructor. Not offered pass/fail.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities ARTS 152 1 course

ARTS 255

Projects in Painting

Continuing research work in painting. Students will be introduced to and asked to explore various painting ideologies. Projects will rotate each semester and will include but not be limited to different media and subject oriented explorations such as the narrative, the grid, the figure, non-objective painting, or the myth. Emphasis will be placed on further development of painting skills, problem solving, critical thinking and visual literacy as well as student initiated research. Prerequisite: ARTS 153. Course may be taken or repeated at the 300 level with advanced expectations and consent of instructor. Not offered pass/fail.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities ARTS 153 1 course

ARTS 262

Studio Lighting: Photographic Illusion

This course is an introduction to the lighting studio, medium and large format photography, film scanners and digital color printing. Using the lighting studio as a basis for the course students will explore assignments such as the constructed still life, studio portraiture and tableau photography in both black and white and color photography. Notions of the real and the ability to create rather than find a document will be central themes of discovery. Students will also explore staged photography and what it means to build sequential narratives and visual metaphors. We will also interrogate concepts of beauty and the historical role of the lighting studio in reinforcing stereotypes about gender and race. Ultimately students will conceptualize how the lighting studio can transform their means of creative production. Emphasis will be placed on independent problem solving, critical thinking, visual literacy and student initiated research. Course may be taken or repeated at the 300 level with advanced expectations and consent of instructor. Not offered pass/fail.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTS 264

Fabricated Photography: Extending the Image

An introduction to experimental cameras and photographic techniques, this course will explore alternative methods for creating photography. Assignments will address areas such as large scale murals, multiple images, photo sculptures/assemblages, photo books, photo installation and projection. Technical processes will explore pinhole and Diana cameras, darkroom experimentation such as sandwiched negatives, hand-applied black and white emulsions, Xerox and heat transfer and non-silver alternative processes such as Cyanotype and Vandyke. Students will simultaneously learn the history of photography as they push the boundaries of the medium. We will also look at the work of other mixed media/photographic artists, including the Starn Twins, Bea Nettles and Carrie Mae Weems and discuss how their process supports their concepts. Emphasis will be placed on independent problem solving, critical thinking, visual literacy and student initiated research. Course may be taken or repeated at the 300 level with advanced expectations and consent of instructor. Not offered pass/fail.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTS 271

Sculpture in Public Places

This course is an intensive investigation of the methods and theories of contemporary public sculpture. Emphasis will be placed on the acquisition of skills and techniques relating to materials suitable for outdoor display, including woodworking, welding, sewing, and fiberglass resin. Discussions and lectures delve deeply into both the practical issues of public art- model-making, site selection, and presenting ideas for approval- but also the theoretical considerations- how and why art in the public sphere is so distinct from more traditional gallery art. Issues of permanence, site-specificity, community engagement, and environmental concerns will be explored through a series of project such as inflatable art, earthworks, and construction of a large-scale sculpture for exhibition on campus. No previous experience necessary.Course may be taken or repeated at the 300 level with advanced expectations and consent of instructor. Not offered pass/fail.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTS 272

Kinetic Sculpture

This course explores contemporary time-based art through basic techniques of movement and kinetics. Various methods of motion are explored, including mechanical devices and motors, natural sources such as wind, and manual or man-driven operations. Demonstrations provide the technical and material expertise necessary to complete related projects such as automaton, flying machines, and self-destructing devices. Discussions and slide lectures will focus on examples of kinetic art through recent art history, with emphasis on conceptual and visual concerns of moving objects; not just how they function physically, but how they are interpreted in the context of our fast-paced, post-industrial culture. Course may be taken or repeated at the 300 level with advanced expectations and consent of instructor. Not offered pass/fail. No previous experience necessary.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTS 276

Bigger, Better Ceramics

In this course, students will learn how to construct large forms out of clay using hand building and throwing techniques. Although many ceramic objects reside in the realm of the handheld, this course will cover numerous strategies that can be used to tackle the challenges associated with large-scale work. These techniques can be employed to greatly expand the potential of working with ceramic materials. In addition to working on large-scale ceramic projects, this course will engage students in the various aspects of studio art practice such as concept development, problem solving, materials testing, visual literacy and critical thinking. Course may be taken or repeated at the 300 level with advanced expectations and consent of instructor. Not offered pass/fail.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTS 277

Casting Clay: Repetition and Refinement

Casting allows the artist to quickly generate multiples from both found objects and original designs. In this course, students will develop creative projects using casting techniques that range from simple press molds to more complex plaster mold systems. These mold-making practices, often associated with industry and mass production, will serve as a springboard for consideration of issues such as originality, authorship, production, consumption and recontextualization. In addition to working on assigned projects, this course will engage students in the various aspects of studio art practice such as concept development, problem solving, materials testing, visual literacy and critical thinking. Course may be taken or repeated at the 300 level with advanced expectations and consent of instructor. Not offered pass/fail.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ARTS 298

Intermediate Studio Art Topics

Intermediate level studio courses in specific media. Areas of study may include: A. Drawing, B. Painting, C. Ceramics, D. Sculpture, E. Photography, F. Video, G. Digital, H. Interdisciplinary Study. Prerequisite will vary. Not offered Pass/Fail

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Varies according to the topic offered. 1 course

ARTS 398

Advanced Studio Art Topics

Advanced level studio courses in specific media. Areas of study may include: A. Drawing, B. Painting, C. Ceramics, D. Sculpture, E. Photography, F. Video, G. Digital, H. Interdisciplinary Study. Prerequisite will vary. Not offered Pass/Fail

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities Prerequisite will vary 1/2-1 course

ARTS 491

Senior Projects

This is the first course in a two-semester series of focused studio practice for art majors in their senior year. In this course, students will produce a body of work that explores themes and concepts relevant to their own artistic research. These ideas will serve as the foundation for their exhibition in the Visual Arts Gallery in the spring semester. Through sustained exploration of ideas, continued experimentation with materials and techniques and ongoing critiques with faculty and peers, students will identify and articulate their core practice as an artist. Students will investigate examples of contemporary art practice through lectures, readings, research presentations and museum visits. In order to prepare for the professional art world, students will develop artist statements, document their work in a portfolio and seek opportunities such as exhibitions, residencies and graduate school.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ARTS 492

Senior Projects

This is the second course in a two-semester series of focused studio practice for art majors in their senior year. In this course, students will produce a cohesive, conceptually focused body of work for exhibition in the Visual Arts Gallery at the end of spring semester. Students will develop contemporary studio practice through artistic research in support of their individual ideas and evidenced mastery of materials and techniques appropriate to their chosen medium. Students will be expected to demonstrate active independent research and studio management, while participating in art related events on and off campus. With the gallery staff, students will engage in all aspects of exhibition; including design of postcards and advertising material, organization and arrangement of the exhibition, and professional installation and de-installation of their art. Submission of a final artist packet, including artist statement, resume, documentation of art, and slide list, will be required of all students. As part of this course's requirement, each student must also prepare and present a formal gallery talk for the exhibition opening. Not offered pass/fail.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course