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Course Catalog

English

With major concentrations in Literature or Writing and a minor in Literature, English offers students the means both to connect with their world and to transcend it. Trained to think inventively and write expressively, English majors of both concentrations are prepared for work in various professional spheres, including graduate study in the field, education, communications, publishing, law and business. Some have established reputations as important scholars, journalists and authors. Literature classes enable students to study literature as an art form. Through courses covering a spectrum of historical, cultural and ethnic perspectives, literature also invites students to explore their own lives and times as well as think beyond their own experience. Classes typically combine lecture and discussion, introducing students to representative works of English, American, and Anglophone writing and encouraging them to develop methods of critical interpretation. The study of writing directly engages students' imaginations and knowledge and helps them develop their potential as writers through courses in fiction, non-fiction, poetry, playwriting, screenwriting and journalism. Small workshop classes provide intensive experience in the crafting and revising of students own work and in the productive critique of others. Students wishing to count courses taken off-campus toward a major in English must have prior approval from their academic advisors and the department chair.


Requirements for a major

Literature

Total courses required Ten
Core courses ENG 151, 251 and ENG 451.
Other required courses One course in literature before 1660, one course in literature between 1660 and 1900, and one course in literature from 1900 to the present
Number 300 and 400 level courses Five
Senior requirement and capstone experience The senior requirement consists of the completion of ENG 451 with a grade of C or better.
Additional information ENG 197 may be counted toward a major. Students may count one ENG 255 that is cross-listed as a Modern Language course toward the major. ENG 351 is recommended but not required.
Recent changes in major For students declaring the English (Literature) major after July 1, 2013, there are several important changes to the major. Students are no longer required to take two of three survey courses or three courses in literature before 1830. ENG 251 is now required, in addition to one course each in the three historical periods identified above.
Writing in the Major

ENG 251, Writing in Literary Studies, fills the writing in the major requirement for English (Literature) majors. This course explores the purpose and craft of writing about literature, refining the ability to recognize and communicate pattern and meaning in texts and culture. The course fosters the writing and research skills necessary for advanced literary study, including the Senior Seminar in Literature, and for participation in larger conversations in the field. Through major writing projects and peer workshops, students practice a variety of approaches to writing and research, while also expanding methods of writing for a variety of audiences.

Writing

Total courses required Ten (Note: these requirements are effective for majors declared after July 1, 2012. For prior requirements see Recent Changes in the Major below.)
Core courses ENG 151, ENG 152, ENG 201 and ENG 412.
Other required courses Three additional courses in writing above the 100-level in at least two different genres, two of which must be at the 300-level. Three additional courses in literature, at least two of which must be at the 300-level.
Number 300 and 400 level courses Five
Senior requirement and capstone experience The senior requirement consists of the completion of ENG 412 with a grade of C or better, as well as a thesis.
Additional information Students must complete a course outside English in the fine arts or performing arts (.25, .5 or 1.0 credit). Students may only count one ENG 255 that is a cross-listed Modern Language course toward the major. ENG 197 may be counted toward a major. Only one course from off-campus study may be counted into the English (Writing) major.
Recent changes in major For students declaring the English (Writing) major after July 1, 2012, there are several important changes in the major: ENG 152, Reading for Writers, is now a core requirement; of the literature electives, at least two, rather than one, must be at 300-level; the total number of upper level courses is increased from 4 to 5; only one off-campus study course may be counted into the major; and students must complete a fine or performing arts course outside English. This last requirement may be completed with a .25, .5, or 1.0 credit course.
Writing in the Major

The English Writing Major prepares students to write in multiple genres, including fiction, poetry, journalism, nonfiction, dramatic writing, as well as analytical prose such as interpretive essays and essays on craft. In workshop, students assist and critique one another as they develop their own writing. In the senior year, majors create a senior thesis in a particular genre accompanied by an artist's statement that serves as an introduction to their work.

By the end of senior year students should:

  • have ample experience in writing in at least three of the following genres: poetry, fiction, journalism, creative nonfiction, playwriting, or screenwriting
  • begin to master a particular genre of creative writing or journalism
  • be adept at critiquing peers' work to assist their fellow writers and improve their own revisions
  • write clear, precise prose--both creative and analytical
  • write convincingly about the art of creative writing--how it is made and why it endures.

Besides focusing on a specific genre, writing majors will learn to write analytically about their discipline. Building on the writing done in their first-year seminar and the sophomore W class, students take English 152, Reading As Writers, a literature class taught by creative writers, in which they do modeling exercises and analyze narrative structure, story and poetic forms, and creative techniques employed by master writers. In this class, they will write papers that break down and synthesize their craft, examining how stories and poems are made, and how various effects are created. After exposure to poetry, fiction, and dramatic writing or nonfiction in English 201, Introduction to Creative Writing, students take three genre courses. These can include News Writing and Editing at the 200-level or a variety of 300-level workshops devoted to specific creative genres. Majors also take English 151, Literature and Interpretation, and three additional literature courses, where they will write interpretative, scholarly papers about the books and texts they read. Finally, in senior year, as part of their capstone seminar, students compose an artist's statement, a thoughtful summary of their ideas about writing in general and their own writing in particular. Students will fulfill the writing in the major requirement when they successively complete senior seminar.


Requirements for a minor

Literature

Total courses required Five literature
Core courses One course that stresses writers before 1830. One course that stresses writers after 1830.
Other required courses ENG 197 may be counted toward a minor. (April 2010)
Number 300 and 400 level courses Two

Courses in Literature

ENG 151

Literature and Interpretation

This course provides a foundation for advanced literary study, as well as skills useful in other disciplines. Through an exploration of varied works of fiction, nonfiction, poetry and film, this course sharpens students' abilities to read texts analytically and introduces them to the terms and strategies employed in contemporary critical discourse.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ENG 167

Introduction to Film

Designed to develop students' ability to understand and appreciate film as art and to acquaint them with a representative group of significant works and the characteristics of film as a type of literature.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ENG 197

First-Year Seminar

An exploration of a literary theme with an emphasis on class discussion and participation, independent projects, historical and cultural awareness and writing. Recent courses have included Poetry of Song, Reading Las Vegas, War and Sex in Arthurian Legend, and Milestones: Four African-American Artists. Enrollment limited to first-year students. May be counted toward a major or minor.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ENG 250

World Literature

A study of literature from both Western and non-Western traditions. Readings may focus on a theme that runs across cultures, a specific historical period or an event that affects a number of cultures.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ENG 251

Writing in Literary Studies

This course explores the purpose and craft of writing about literature, refining the ability to recognize and communicate pattern and meaning in texts and culture. The course fosters the writing and research skills necessary for advanced literary study, including the Senior Seminar in Literature, and for participation in larger conversations in the field. Through major writing projects and peer workshops, students will practice a variety of approaches to writing and research, while also expanding methods of writing for a variety of audiences. Required for Literature majors. Not open for credit to students who have completed ENG 350.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities None 1 course

ENG 252

Children's Literature

An examination of children's literature, attending to its history, canon and audience - both children and adults - and to selected topics, such as storytelling and censorship. Establishing criteria for several genres, students read widely to judge poetry, realistic fiction, picture books, fantasy, etc. and to compile bibliographies. May be counted toward a major in English. Offered second semester.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ENG 255

Topics in Literary Studies

While refining students' general analytical and interpretive skills, this course offers intensive examination of specific issues in literature and culture, often those at the center of current critical interest. Recent sections have focused on The Gangster Film, Memoir and Sexuality, Quest for the Grail, and Native American Literature. Students may only count one ENG 255 that is a cross-listed Modern Language course toward the major or minor.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ENG 261

Modern Continental Literature

European writing from about 1885, stressing new directions in fiction and poetry from Zola to contemporary writers. Counts toward European Studies Minor.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ENG 263

African-American Literature

A study of African-American writing, including biographies, essays and polemics as well as drama, fiction and poetry.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ENG 264

Women and Literature: Topics

Introduces students to the work of women writers and the importance of gender as a category of literary analysis. Issues covered may include: images of women in literature by women and men; impediments women writers have faced; women's writing in historical/social context; feminist literature; intersections of race, class and gender. May be repeated for credit with a different topic.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ENG 265

Asian American Literature

This course introduces students to the cultural diversity of Asian-American writing. Through a broadly structured anthology showcasing enduring works of prose, poetry, and drama, supplemented by a collection of short fiction, a novel, a play and a collection of poems, this course will develop a deeper understanding of the diverse works of Asian-American writers, poets and playwrights. Since Asian-American literature is typically presented from the perspective of race, our topics will focus on cultural identity, immigration experience, displacement, gender identities, and language.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ENG 266

Native American Literature

This course surveys a range of American Indian oral and written literatures within the context of Euro-American colonization, conflict, and assimilation. We will assess the problems facing early native writers working within an alien culture and examine the ways the more recent writers of the Native American Renaissance have redefined Indian identity as a compromise between traditional Native culture and contemporary American society. Reading may include creation myths and trickster stories, Native autobiographical writing, fiction, and poetry.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ENG 281

British Writers I

This course surveys works of representative British authors from Anglo-Saxon times through the Augustan period. It is designed for students wishing to acquaint themselves with this broad area of British letters. Counts toward European Studies Minor.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ENG 282

British Writers II

A continuation of the survey begun in ENG 281, this course begins with representative writers of the Romantic period and ends with contemporary British literature. ENG 281 is not a prerequisite for this course. Counts toward European Studies Minor.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities ENG 281 is not a prerequisite for this course. 1 course

ENG 283

American Writers

A study of representative American authors from the exploration of the New World to the present with attention to the literature of ethnic cultures.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ENG 351

Principles of Literary Studies

This course is designed to give majors in English and related fields a grasp of the most important theories, terms and traditions that shape contemporary literary studies. Recommended for both literature and writing majors, and especially for anyone considering graduate study in English.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ENG 360

Chaucer and His World

Realism and romance in selected major poems of Chaucer and his contemporaries studied in their medieval context. Counts toward European Studies Minor.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ENG 361

Shakespeare

A study of representative plays drawn from the histories, comedies, tragedies and late romances. Wide-ranging themes will include questions about gender relations and identity, both personal and national, and the conventions of Elizabethan performance. Counts toward European Studies Minor.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ENG 363

Renaissance or Early Modern British Literature

A study of major developments in prose and poetry in English literature between 1500 and 1660, an age of exploration both literal and figurative. In both canonical works (by Sidney, Spenser, Donne, Jonson, Herbert and Milton) and recently rediscovered poems by Lady Mary Wroth, Aemilia Lanyer and Katherine Philips, we will analyze the intersection of influences--Classical and Biblical, native and Continental, medieval and modern. Counts toward European Studies Minor.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ENG 364

Milton

A revolutionary who wrote against censorship and in defense of divorce, whose poetry made a mark on future generations of writers, Milton redefined heroism in his epic, Paradise Lost. We will study his major poems and selected prose, analyzing his transformation of every genre he touched: sonnet, pastoral elegy, masque, epic and tragedy. Counts toward European Studies Minor.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ENG 365

Restoration and Eighteenth Century

An in-depth survey of literary genres (including poetry, satire, the periodical essay, the gothic, and the novel) from 1660-1800 and their relationship to nationalism, gender, empire, and the cultural and political practices of the English Enlightenment. Counts toward European Studies Minor.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ENG 366

The Romantic Period

Focuses on English poetry from approximately 1790-1830, along with related works of fiction, criticism and philosophy. Writers often studied include Blake, Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Percy Shelley, Mary Shelley and Keats. Counts toward European Studies Minor.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ENG 367

The Victorian Period

Focuses on writers who worked in the last 70 years of the 19th century. Writers often studied include Dickens, Carlyle, George Eliot, Tennyson, Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Browning. Counts toward European Studies Minor.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ENG 368

Modern British Literature

British novelists, poets and dramatists of the first half of the 20th century, including Conrad, Joyce, Yeats, Lawrence and Woolf. Counts toward European Studies Minor.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ENG 369

Contemporary British Literature

British and postcolonial writers from the mid-20th century to the present. Writers may include Rushdie, Gordimer, Larkin, Amis and Heaney. Counts toward European Studies Minor.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ENG 371

American Literature: Revolution and Renaissance

A study of literature from the American Revolution through "the American Renaissance," when the writing of American authors first achieved an international reputation. Writers might include Jefferson, Franklin, Cooper, Poe, Emerson, Hawthorne, Douglass, Stowe, Melville, Jacobs, Whitman and Dickinson.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ENG 372

American Literature: The Age of Realism

A study of the literary culture between the Civil War and World War I, including considerations of realism, regionalism and naturalism as well as works of nonfiction. Writers might include Twain, James, Jewett, Crane, DuBois, Chesnutt, Dreiser, Wharton and Cather.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ENG 373

American Literature: Modern

A study of literature written in the first half of the 20th century and the main philosophical, social and aesthetic issues that shaped it. Writers might include Faulkner, Hemingway, Eliot, Williams, Dos Passos, Moore, Hurston, Hughes, and Wright.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ENG 374

American Literature: Post-War to Post-Modern

A study of literature since the end of World War II, including that of minority writers, and the main philosophical, social and aesthetic issues that shaped it. Writers might include Warren, Nabokov, Bishop, Roth, Morrison, Rich, Pynchon, Erdrich, Kingston and Cisneros.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ENG 390

Women and Literature: Advanced Topics

Designed for English majors and/or students with some background in Women's Studies. Topics will provide opportunities for in-depth analysis of women writers and gender literary analysis. Issues covered may include: images of women in literature; women's writing in historical/social context; feminist literature theory and literary criticism; intersections of race, class and gender; formation of the literary canon. May be repeated for credit with a different topic.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ENG 391

Authors: Advanced Topics

In-depth study of one or more writers. Examples include Joyce, Morrison, Samuel Johnson, and Henry James.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ENG 392

Genre: Advanced Topics

Study of works drawn from a specific literary genre or subgenre. Examples include Confessional Poetry, The Early Novel and Revenge Tragedy.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ENG 393

Literature and Culture: Advanced Topics

A study of the relations between literature and culture, with a specific thematic focus. Examples include Literature and Law, American Gothic, and Drugs, Literature and Culturet.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ENG 394

Literature and History: Advanced Topics

A study of literary representations of historical topics. Examples include Literature and Toleration, New England Heterodoxy, and Literature of Reform.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ENG 395

Literature and Theory: Advanced Topics

Study of a specific topic within contemporary literary theory. Examples include The Rise and Fall of Deconstruction, Theories of the Avant Garde, and Film Theory.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ENG 396

World Literature: Advanced Topics

Study of works in world literature emphasizing a global context. Examples include The Bildungsroman, Representations of the Artist, The Global Avant-Garde, The Great Novel, and Global Science Fiction.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ENG 397

Irish Literature: Advanced Topics

An intensive exploration of Irish culture and authors from a literary perspective. Topics might include medieval Irish literature, James Joyce, modern Irish drama, Irish mythology, the Gaelic revival, Irish poets, the "troubles" and postcolonialism, and Irish film.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ENG 451

Seminar in Literature

Concentrated study of a topic in literary studies. Prerequisite: two 300- or 400-level courses in literature. Required of majors in English with emphasis on literature. May be repeated once for credit.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Two 300- or 400-level courses in literature. Required of majors in English with emphasis on literature. 1 course

ENG 460

Readings in Literature

Directed studies, with individual conferences or seminars, centered on a specific project arranged with the instructor and including the writing of papers. Prerequisite: senior classification and permission of instructor and chairman of department. Students seeking permission to take the course must present previous to registration to the department chair a written statement of the project countersigned by the instructor who will direct it.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Senior classification and permission of instructor and chairman of department. 1/2-1 course

Courses in Writing

ENG 001

Co-Curricular Activities

A. The DePauw--Writers; B. The DePauw--Editors; C. Midwestern Review; D. Mirage , E. Eye on the World and F. the cauldron. Practical experience in writing for The DePauw (A&B), Midwestern Review (C), Mirage (D) , Eye on the World (E), and the cauldron (F). The DePauw writers (A) receive one-quarter activity credit per semester, and editors (B) receive one-half activity credit per semester. Midwestern Review, Mirage , Eye on the World and the cauldron staff members (C, D, E and F) receive one-quarter activity credit (Group 6) per semester. No academic credit is awarded toward the 31 courses required for graduation. Prerequisite: signature of The DePauw advisor required.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Signature of The DePauw advisor required 0 credit

ENG 110

Writing Seminar for Non-Native Speakers of English I

This course develops and strengthens the level of English language fluency of incoming international students who begin to write, speak, and read proficiently and rigorously at an academic college level. May not be counted toward a major in English. See Writing Program for details

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ENG 115

Writing Seminar for Non-Native Speakers of English II

This course is aimed at challenging incoming international students more than ENG 110. This course focuses more on academic writing proficiency and critical thinking in preparation for the advanced level of challenge offered by ENG 130. English 115 may not be counted toward a major in English. See Writing Program for details.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ENG 120

College Writing I

This course reviews good writing strategies to prepare students for the level of reading, writing and critical thinking done in College Writing II. By means of short essay assignments, students build fluency and confidence in writing. May not be counted toward a major in English. See Writing Program for details.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ENG 130

College Writing II

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of reading and writing at the college level. Assignments focus on a variety of essay forms, including personal narrative and analytical argument, helping students to develop skills in critical thinking, interpretation, argumentation, and research documentation. Through the study of the writing process, students learn to generate essays for a variety of writing tasks across the curriculum. May not be counted toward a major in English. See Writing Program for details.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ENG 152

Reading as Writers

This course focuses on contemporary literature from the perspective of method and craft. Through close reading of poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, playwriting and screenwriting, students will examine how literary artists work and think. This is a foundational course for the English Writing major, but the skills gained will be useful across disciplines.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

ENG 201

Introduction to Creative Writing

An introduction to writing and reading fiction and poetry in a workshop setting using the work of contemporary poets and writers as models. May include some creative non-fiction and/or dramatic writing.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ENG 232

News Writing and Editing

An introduction to the art and craft of writing for newspapers, including story structure, research techniques, interviewing, note taking, ethics, libel and AP Style. Students will hone their writing and reporting skills by covering campus events, writing stories on deadline and following national and local media coverage.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ENG 301

Creative Writing II: Fiction Workshop

A workshop focused on the writing of short fiction using modern and contemporary short stories as models and inspiration. Prerequisite: ENG 201.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
ENG 201 1 course

ENG 302

Creative Writing II: Fiction Topics

Topics in fiction writing with particular concentration on specific forms or other aspects of the genre using readings as models and inspiration. This might include the novella or the short-short story or techniques such as magical realism, meta-fiction, minimalism, etc., depending on the instructor. Prerequisite: ENG 201.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
ENG 201 1 course

ENG 311

Creative Writing II: Poetry Workshop

A workshop that gives students the opportunity to sharpen their skills as poets and exposes them to a wide range of contemporary poetry. Prerequisite: ENG 201.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
ENG 201 1 course

ENG 312

Creative Writing II: Poetry Topics

The course provides a particular focus on poetic forms or sub-genres of poetry. These might include dramatic monologue and extended poetic projects such as sequences in a particular form or voice. Effort is made to broaden students reading knowledge of poetry. Prerequisite: ENG 201.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
ENG 201 1 course

ENG 321

Creative Writing II: Nonfiction Workshop

This course will focus on the art and craft of nonfiction with special attention to giving nonfiction the immediacy and liveliness of fiction. Forms explored may include profiles, travel writing, personal essays, reviews, memoir, nature writing or literary nonfiction. Prerequisite: ENG 201.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
ENG 201 1 course

ENG 322

Creative Writing II: Nonfiction Topics

This course will explore a specific genre of nonfiction in depth. Class will operate as an advanced writing workshop that uses master works as models and inspiration. Offerings might include profiles, travel writing, personal essays, reviews, memoir, nature writing or literary nonfiction. Prerequisite: ENG 201.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
ENG 201 1 course

ENG 331

Creative Writing II: Advanced Reporting Workshop

An upper-level reporting class for students who have taken News Writing and Editing or have written for a student publication. Students will analyze and discuss long-form, investigative journalism and write a series of in-depth news features. The course will address how to incorporate literary techniques in news writing.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ENG 332

Creative Writing II: Advanced Reporting Topics

An upper-level reporting class for students who have taken News Writing and Editing or have written for a student publication. Students will study specifics forms of journalistic writing. Offerings might include feature writing, profiles, investigative journalism, magazine feature writing, or reviews and criticism.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

ENG 341

Creative Writing II: Playwriting Workshop

An introduction to the process of playwriting. The course will explore dramatic action for the stage--working with character, setting, dialogue, tone and style--through writing workshop, discussion and selected readings. Students will write monologues, scenes, a ten-minute play and a one-act play. Prerequisite: ENG 201.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
ENG 201 1 course

ENG 342

Creative Writing II: Screenwriting Workshop

An introduction to the fundamentals of screenwriting, in theory and in practice. Students will explore story, character, dialogue and structure as relates to writing for film; learn the screenplay format; and participate in writing workshop and discussion. Prerequisite: ENG 201.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
ENG 201 1 course

ENG 343

Creative Writing II: Dramatic Writing Topics

An upper level writing course that focuses on specific elements or forms within a genre of dramatic writing. Offerings might include The One Act Play, The Dramatic Monologue, The Short Film Script, Advanced Screenwriting or Advanced Playwriting. Prerequisite: ENG 201.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
ENG 201 1 course

ENG 401

Independent Writing

Independent writing under tutorial supervision designed for seniors wishing to develop or complete one of the longer forms. Prerequisites: senior classification, the successful completion of three courses in writing above the freshman level, and permission of instructor and chair of the department. Prior to registration, the student must present to the chairman of the department a written statement of the project countersigned by the instructor who will serve as tutor.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Senior classification, the successful completion of three courses in writing above the freshman level, and permission of instructor and chair of the department. 1 course

ENG 412

Seminar in Writing

This is an advanced creative writing workshop in which students design their own independent projects under the guidance of the instructor. Seminars generally explore a specific genre in depth. Prerequisite: senior classification and the successful completion of three courses in writing above the 100 level, two at the 300 level.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Senior classification and the successful completion of three courses in writing above the 100 level, two at the 300 level. 1 course

Courses in English

ENG 183

Off-Campus Study Project

Winter or May Term off-campus study project.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
variable

ENG 183

Off-Campus Study Project

Winter or May Term off-campus study project.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
variable