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CLST 200

Topics in Classical Studies

Study of a specific topic in Mediterranean civilizations or literature. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
1 course

Fall Semester information

James Wells

200A: Tps:Classica Africana

This course explores the ways in which modern literature of peoples of African descent engages with ancient Greek and Roman literature. It focuses upon how the oppositional art of Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man, Toni Morrison's Beloved, and Rita Doves' Mother Love riffs on such works of classical literature as Homer's Odyssey, Euripides' Medea and The Homeric Hymn to Demeter.

Spring Semester information

Michael Seaman

200A: Tps:Ancient Warfare

"War is the father of all and king of all." With these words, the ancient Greek philosopher, Heraclitus expressed the view that strife was a natural and necessary state of affairs in the world. Indeed, warfare as a deliberate state policy is a theme that runs through Western Civilization, if not world history. War and its consequences were an unavoidable part of daily life in the ancient world. This course is a study of ancient warfare with an emphasis on Greece and Rome. We begin with a brief look at warfare in the ancient Near East, including Mesopotamia, Egypt, and Assyria. We then shift our focus to the ancient Greek world with studies of the Bronze Age, Homeric warfare, the hoplite phalanx, Sparta, the Persian and Peloponnesian Wars, and the Age of Alexander the Great. Lastly, we look at Roman Warfare from the Punic Wars and Hannibal to Julius Caesar to the Fall of Rome. We look not only at major battles but pay particular attention to the function of warfare in society and its impact on political and social history. Additional topics studied include battle formations, armor, generalship, tactics and strategies, weapon lethality, technology and warfare, siege warfare, civilians in warfare, the economics of war, and treatment of the defeated.