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Visiting Writers - Fall 2004


Novelist
Doug Bauer

reading
Wednesday, September 15, 2004
7:30 p.m.
Peeler Art Center Auditorium

     

Born in Cheyenne, WY and raised on an Iowa grain farm, Doug Bauer began his career as a journalist and is now primarily a novelist and teacher of writing.  After a 1979 non-fiction work, Prairie City, Iowa, he published three novels:  Dexterity (1989); The Very Air (1993); and The Book of Famous Iowans (1997).  The latter was a NY Times Notable Book.  A book of essays, The Stuff of Fiction: Advice on Craft, has just been published.  He has taught at Harvard's writing program and since 1993 has taught in Bennington College's MFA program.

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Poet and former DePauw Professor
Maurice Manning

reading

Wednesday,
September 29, 2004
7:30 p.m.

 PAC Thompson Recital Hall

 


Photo courtesy of The DePauw

 


Picture taken by Steve Cody

A Companion for Owls:
Being the Commonplace Book of
D. Boone
Long Hunter, Back Woodsman, & c.

by Maurice Manning

 

Publisher: Harcourt (September 6, 2004)



Jacket illustration @Corbus
Jacket design by Vaughn Andrews

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Sponsored by Office of Multicultural Affairs

Some people never stray far from home. While writer, Achy Obejas has lived in the midwest for most of her life, Cuba is still her inspirational home and th e subject of many of her musings, poetry and stories including her first two novels: We Came All the Way from Cuba So You Could Dress Like This?  (Cleis Press 1994) and  Memory Mambo (Cleis Press 1996). Her most recent novel, Days of Awe (Ballantine Books 2001) won the 2002 Lambda Award for Lesbian Fiction. In addition to being a novelist, Obejas is an accomplished journalist and poet. Her writing credits include the Chicago Sun-Times, The Chicago Reader, The Windy City Times, The Advocate, High Performance, The Village Voice, and most recently the Chicago Tribune. In 1998, Ms Obejas was awarded the Peter Lisagor Award for political reporting on the Chicago mayoral elections. Her poetry has appeared in a number of journals and in 1986 she received an NEA fellowship in poetry.

 

Novelist, Journalist & Poet

Achy Obejas

reading
Tuesday, October 12, 2004
7:00pm
the Social Center

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Science Fiction Writer
Kim Stanley Robinson

reading
Friday,
November 12, 2004

Peeler Art Center Auditorium
Kim Stanley Robinson is widely regarded as one of the finest science fiction writers alive today. He is best known for his 'Mars Trilogy'—Red Mars (1992), which won the Nebula award for best novel, Green Mars (1993), which won the Hugo Award for best novel, and Blue Mars (1995), which also won the Hugo Award for best novel. Robinson is also well known for his 'Orange Country Trilogy'—The Wild Shore (1984), The Gold Coast (1988) and Pacific Edge (1990). His most recent novel, Forty Signs of Rain, depicts the events leading up to a worldwide catastrophe brought on by global warming.

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Performance Poet
Jessica Care Moore

reading
Monday,
November 15, 2004
7:30 p.m.
Peeler Art Center Auditorium

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GLCA Prose Award Winner
Patricia Sarrafian Ward


reading
Wednesday,
December 8, 2004
7:30 p.m.
Peeler Art Center Auditorium

 


"The magic of Lebanon infects any person born there and any visitor who steps onto the land for even just one day," writes Patricia Ward in her story about troubled teenage sisters in war-torn Beirut.  The narrator, Marianna, and her sister are the offspring of an Amercian/Armenian marriage.  In this deeply personal coming-of-age novel, each sister struggles to survive a near-fatal depression that is her own internal civil war.  Marianna tells how her world grows smaller and smaller, until there is only her room--and then only her memories of a Lebanon both real and imagined.  The adults in the sisters' lives inhabit an unreal world of denial, where civil war and depression are interspersed with hopeful truces, and family gatherings in the fresh piney mountains above the city promise that all will soon be well.  The sisters know better--or do they?  "What is this magic, this country that insists on being remembered even after forcing us to leave?"  Good memories and bad can be equally haunting, and even when Ward writes of despair, her prose is lyrically poetic.

                                                     --William Tracy, Saudi Aramco World