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DePauw & Greencastle Join Together in Community Garden Project

November 10, 2009

Community Garden Nov2009.jpgNovember 10, 2009, Greencastle, Ind. — "Maintaining the garden has really been a collective effort," says Tim Martin, a DePauw University senior who led the effort to create a community garden for Greencastle.  Located at the intersection of Franklin and Spring streets, it is a city-owned plot where "people from the city and from DePauw have come together," Martin tells the Banner-Graphic. (photo: Lily Bonwich, Al Little, Karen Martoglio, Bruce Sanders and Tyler Hess at work)

Jamie Barrand writes, "Martin is a religious studies major at DePauw, and is also a Bonner Scholar. He said he became involved with the development of the community garden because he was 'really interested in different aspects of the sustainability movement' ... Martin has enjoyed the sense of unity he has seen the garden foster between people affiliated with DePauw and people from the Greencastle community."

Martin tells the newspaper, "I'm learning so much from members of the community." 

The story notes that Karen Martoglio, a help desk analyst, serves on the city's Sustainability Committee and is a master gardener. "I know I'm not the only one who has Tim Martin community garden.jpgromantic ideas about what a community garden can do as far as bringing people together," she says. "Plus, there is a real educational component to it ... people who don't have the space to garden at there own homes and who wouldn't get the chance to have a garden otherwise are afforded a great opportunity."

Tyler Hess, a DePauw first-year student from Louisville, is also cited in the article for participating in the community garden. "I sort of think of it like, if there is a piece of trash on the sidewalk in your town, you're going to pick it up because it's your sidewalk too and you want to take care of it," he states. "This garden will be like that. Everyone who gets a bed here will be a part of it and will want to make it work. I really think this is going to flourish."

Read the complete story at the Banner-Graphic's Web site.

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