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Women of the Week

Each week we will feature a new DePauw student and faculty/staff member to highlight their accomplishments and contributions.

Name: Rebecca Carreno

Major: Anthropology and Spanish

Class Standing: Senior

Hometown: Chicago

 

  1. Who is/was an important woman in your life? The most important is my mother, she has sacrificed so much (emotionally, physically) of her life to give and provide my sister and I a better future. She has taught us to love ourselves and to be powerful strong women not only individually but also in support of our communities.
  2. What class (taught or taken) was most transformative for you? There are many anthropology classes that have inspired me, and I will always be thankful to anthropology for allowing me to have a space and a voice that because of my minority status is hard to find in DePauw’s campus. However, my study abroad program, Mexico Solidarity Network, was my most transformative experience. Thanks to this program, I was, finally, able to think and reflect about the importance of the power of the people, what does it mean to come together, reflect, and organized. All of us have agency to change our surrounding and bettered our communities when they are at risk of being destroyed by injustice and oppression.
  3. What issues affecting women are most important to you? I solidarize with any issue that speaks against social or political constructive norms that take away power from women, deny rights from women, oppress women, or obligates women to conform to ideologies that does not represent the reality of what it means to be a woman.
  4. If you could invite one woman to speak on campus, who would it be and why?
     During my study abroad, I met Luz, a Mexican activist that is fighting against the injustices of the Mexican government and transnational corporations that are threaten to end with communities in Mexico. She is amazing and great. She carries so much power in her words and in her actions. A real life example of inspiration. Many times, her real stories of struggle and fight moved me deeply to the point that I would cry, not because of sadness, but because they are still people in the world like Luz who are willing to give their lives for the sake of  dignity, life, love of their people. I wish everyone could have a Luz in their lives.
  5. What message would you most like to get out to young girls? YOU ARE POWERFUL NO MATTER WHAT!!!!!
  6. Favorite superheroine- Wonder Woman, Buffy, Storm, Arwen, Elektra, Xena, or other?
     Real revolutionary activists women that I met in Mexico during my study abroad, Luz, Edith, Elisa. Their lives are examples to follow, the real heroes of our communities.
  7. What is one of your earliest memories of being a feminist? Speaking against the injustices of rape culture.
  8. Where did you grow up or go to school and how did/does that affect you?
     I grew up in Mexico, moved to Mexico at age 14. The transition was very difficult. All I can think of was culture shock and copping with a new world. This experienced definitely made me appreciate my country and culture more. It has also allowed me to accept challenge and learn the most from every experience.
  9. Who is your favorite author/musician/artist, and why do you enjoy his/her work so much?
      Author, much like topics: Latinamerica ethnographies are usually powerful for me to read and appreciate cultural diversity because they get rid of sterotypes and actually take a moment to learn about the realities of the people in Latinamerica like social political and economical injustices, resitance, community building, anti-capitalism, collectivity, etc. Musicians: Calle 13, Leon Gieco, La Santa Cecilia, Las cafeteras, Silvio Rodriguez, Victor Jara, they are also Latinamerican revolutionary musicians that speak against the injustice, about neoliberalism, about the power of the people. Powerful music!  
  10. When did you first realize that you have the power to make a positive change in society? 
    You realize you have power when you start getting angry and you start questioning your surroundings. Why? We need to do something!!!! NOW!!! In reality, everybody has agency, but it is in those moments where you can reflect, act, impact, and move mountains. The recipe of the work of activism is to be patient, passionate, and persistent, and most importantly to believe!

 

 

 

Name: Myrna Hernandez

Position on campus: Assistant Dean of Students for Campus Living & Community Development

Where did you grow up: Portage, IN

 

  1. What class (taught or taken) was most transformative for you? Student Development Theory in graduate school. It obviously informs what I do now, but also taught me an enormous amount about identity and privilege and a number of realities I have not personally experienced.
  2. What issues affecting women are most important to you? The way women are portrayed in Western media: in particular, the casting of Latina women in prescriptive roles and the casting of Latina characters by non-Latina actresses and the prescribed image of beauty prevalent in mass media.
  3. If you could invite one woman to speak on campus, who would it be and why?
     Oprah Winfrey…while she is often critiqued, I think she stands out as a woman of color who strives to be a positive, empowering public personality.
  4. What message would you most like to get out to young girls? Trust your instincts and fight for what you believe in.
  5. Favorite superheroine- Wonder Woman, Buffy, Storm, Arwen, Elektra, Xena, or other?
     Nancy Drew...I remember her as smart and savvy. To this day I LOVE a good mystery.
  6. What is one of your earliest memories of being a feminist? I don’t know if it’s my earliest memory, but I recall taking a Reading Education and Adolescent Literature class in undergrad where I analyzed and thought about the gender messaging in fairy tales and stories read by young girls.
  7. Where did you grow up or go to school and how did/does that affect you?
     I grew up in a traditional, Puerto Rican family with a strong Catholic upbringing. It made me appreciate the value of family, food, music and community. My parents do not have college degrees but were highly focused on education and the goal of higher education.
  8. Who is your favorite author/musician/artist, and why do you enjoy his/her work so much?
      Alicia Keys…her music is passionate and soulful, it’s real to me.