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Women of the Week

Each week we will feature a new DePauw student and faculty/staff member to highlight their accomplishments and contributions.

Name: Catherine ‘Cate’ Hensley

Major: Communication with a minor in Vocal Performance

Class Standing: Sophomore

Hometown: Skokie, IL

  1. Who is/was an important woman in your life? My grandmother was and always will be the most important role model for me. She passed away a few years ago, but she was an INCREDIBLE advocate and woman. She worked as a nurse for AIDS patients when we still did not know how it was transmitted, she did religious work with gay and lesbian parishioners who were not accepted into the church but were always accepted in her home, and she was a hospice care worker and a hospital chaplain. She saw over 50 countries in her lifetime, and was FAR ahead of her time. She was an amazing woman.
  1. What issues affecting women are most important to you? For anyone who knows me well, they know how important the issue of sexual assault and harassment prevention is to me. I have been doing an awareness campaign on campus regarding this issue, which is based off of the “He for She” campaign recently made famous by Emma Watson’s speech to the UN. Please contact me if you are interested in getting more information regarding this!
  2. What message would you most like to get out to young girls? Love yourself! Love your body, your flaws, your strengths and your challenges. They are all a part of what make you unique and wonderful!
  3. What is one of your earliest memories of being a feminist? Now, this I don’t even remember, but my mom has proudly told me this story many times. Apparently, when I was quite young, I asked her who the first woman President was. When I received the answer, I was absolutely BEYOND outraged, at the age of six. Got started young!
  4. Where did you grow up or go to school and how did/does that affect you?
     I grew up in Skokie, Il, a diverse and well-populated suburb of Chicago (about twenty minutes outside of the city). I am beyond blessed to have been able to go there, I received a really wonderful public school education and was able to meet first generation students from all around the world. I love that I was able to have that as the norm when coming to DePauw. I feel like that helped me gain some perspective during the movement last year, and helped me to understand the effect the DePauw ‘bubble’ has on people.


 

Name: M. Susan Anthony

Position on campus: Professor of Communication and Theatre

Where did you grow up: Fort Recovery, OH

 

  1. Who is/was an important woman in your life? My mother--a professional woman who balanced her job with motherhood. She began a teaching career in a one-room school house, and over the next 38 years worked to obtain her Bachelors and Masters degrees, eventually serving as a county supervisor of elementary education. In addition, she raised five children and helped with dozens of charitable causes.
  2. What class (taught or taken) was most transformative for you? American History–(my first college class) sparked a love of learning about social history and ways in which people lived in past centuries.  Later study of theatrical history and performance prompted me to delve into the historical context of plays and bring that world to the rehearsal process.
  3. What issues affecting women are most important to you? Occupational limits, body image, second shift issues, caregiving issues (lack of support for caregivers)
  4. If you could invite one woman to speak on campus, who would it be and why?
     Hillary
  5. What message would you most like to get out to young girls? Find satisfaction in your own life and pursuits; don’t wait on another person to make you happy.
  6. Favorite superheroine- Wonder Woman, Buffy, Storm, Arwen, Elektra, Xena, or other?
     Boudica
  7. What is one of your earliest memories of being a feminist? When I was 6 years old,  I watched my mother write a check on her own checking account, using money that she herself had earned. I remember thinking, “Now THAT is something I want to be able to do.”
  8. Where did you grow up or go to school and how did/does that affect you?
     I grew up in the tiny village of Fort Recovery, which was historically significant: in 1791, different tribes of Native Americans joined together to destroy the Continental Army of the United States.  Consequently, I became very interested in the history of the United States, the history of Native Americans, and theater of the 18th and 19th centuries in this country.
  9. Who is your favorite author/musician/artist, and why do you enjoy his/her work so much?
      I’m currently a fan of authors Diana Gabaldon (historical fiction) and Deborah Harkness (with a sci-fi twist);  my musical tastes are pretty eclectic, and I’m a huge fan of actors Maggie Smith, Esse Davis, Meryl Streep and Chris Waltz.
  10. When did you first realize that you have the power to make a positive change in society? 
    When I began teaching, I realized that I might affect individuals; I’m thrilled when a former student tells me of her/his success---and credits me with helping in some way. I’m still exploring ways to enact positive changes in society.

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