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Course List for First-Year Students

The following courses are open to first-year students. Some do require prior study and placement. All of these courses, except CHEM 170, are full credit courses. Incoming students normally take four course credits, including the First-Year Seminar. If the course counts toward satisfying the distribution area requirements, that is noted after the course title in the description: AH = Arts & Humanities, SS = Social Science, SM = Science and Math, LA = Language. Courses that satisfy the quantitative reasoning requirement will be noted as "(Q)."

 

Menu of Courses

AFST 100 Introduction to Africana Studies
ANTH151 Human Cultures
ANTH153 Human Origins
ARAB191 Beginning Arabic I
ARAB291 Intermediate Arabic I
ARTH131 Intro to Art Hist, Ancient-Medieval
ARTH132 Intro Art Hist, Ren-Mod
ARTH135 East Asian Art Survey II
ARTS153 Intro to Painting
ARTS160 Intro to Digital Art
ARTS163 Intro to Photography
ARTS170 Intro to Sculpture
ARTS175 Intro to Ceramics
ASIA140 Intro to Chinese Culture
BIO101 Molecules, Cells & Genes
BIO102 Evolution, Organisms & Ecology
CFT100 Introduction to Conflict Studies
CHEM120 Struc/Prop Organic Mol
CHEM130 Struc/Prop Inorg Compds
CHEM170 Stoichiometric Calculations
CHIN161 Elementary Chinese I
CHIN261 Intermediate Chinese I
CHIN361 Advanced Chinese I
CLST100 Greek & Roman Mythology
CLST253 Greek Civilization
CLST254 Roman Civilization
CLST263 Greek, Etruscan and Persian Art
COMM110 Intro to Theatre
COMM111 Acting I
COMM117 Theatre Prod. & Design I (Q)
COMM123 Public Speaking
CSC121 Computer Science I (Q)
ECON100 Intro to Economics (Q)
EDUC170 Foundations of Education
EDUC290 Topics: Banned Books
ENG149 Intro to Creative Writing
ENG151 
R&L: Poetry, Fiction, Drama
ENG161 R&L: Visual & Digital Narratives
ENG167 Intro to Film
ENG171 R&L: Intercultural Perspectives
ENG181 R&L: Ethics and Society
ENG191 R&L: Science & Tech
ENG250 World Literature
ENG255G Topics: 19th C. Russian Lit
ENG263 African American Literature
ENG281 British Writers 1
ENG283 American Writers
FILM100 Introduction to Film
FILM241B Topics: Contemporary Women Filmmakers in France
FREN101 Elementary French I
FREN110 Review of Elem. French
FREN201 Intermediate French I
FREN202 Intermediate French II
FREN305 Fren. Conv. & Phonetics
GEOS105 Earthquakes and Volcanoes
GEOS110 Earth & the Environment (Q)
GEOS125 Intro to Environmental Science
GER111 Elementary German I
GER112 Elementary German II
GER211 Intermediate German I
GER212 Intermediate German II
GRK101 Elementary Greek I 
GRK205 Greek Prose & Poetry 
HIST100 Topics: East Meets West
HIST107 Intro to China & Japan
HIST109 African Civilizations
HIST111 Euro. Civ. I 1300-1800
HIST112 Euro. Civ. II 1789-Pres
HIST115 Colonial Latin America
HIST122 Modern Middle East
HIST252 Ethnicity and Conflict in South Africa
HIST290B Topics: Tech & Change in the Middle East
ITAL171 Intro to Italian I
ITAL271 Intermediate Italian
ITAL371 Advanced Italian
JAPN151 Elementary Japanese I
JAPN251 Intermediate Japanese I
JAPN351 Advanced Japanese I
KINS100 Intro to Kinesiology
LAT123 Elementary Latin I
LAT140 Review of Elementary Latin
LAT223 Intro. to Latin Prose
MATH123 Computational Discrete Math (Q)
MATH135 Calculus with Review
MATH141 Stats for Professionals
MATH151 Calculus I (Q)
MATH152 Calculus II (Q)
MATH223 Foundations of Adv. Math (Q)
MATH251 Calculus III (Q)
ML227 19th Century Russian Literature
ML295A Topics: Contemporary Women Filmmakers in France
MUS100 Fundamentals of Music Theory
MUS102 Music Appreciation
PHIL101 Intro to Philosophy
PHIL212 History of Western Philosophy: Ancient
PHYS104 Stars and Galaxies (Q)
PHYS120 Principles of Physics I (Q)
PHYS130 Principles of Physics II (Q)
POLS110A American National Government
POLS110B American Govt. Political Systems Today
POLS130 Political Theory
POLS150 Comparative Pols & Govt
PSY100 Introductory Psychology
REL130 Intro to Religions
REL130E Intro to Religions--Asian
REL141 Hebrew Bible
REL142 New Testament 
REL 267 Caribbean Religions and Culture
REL 290A Topics: Religion, Death & Mourning
REL 290B Topics: The Bible Now
RUS121 Elementary Russian I
RUS221 Intermediate Russian I
RUS224 Reading Russian
SOC100 Contemporary Society
SPAN131 Elementary Spanish I
SPAN140 Intensive Elem. Spanish
SPAN231 Intermediate Spanish I
SPAN330 Span. Conv. & Phonetics
SPAN332 Span. Reading & Grammar
UNIV101 Intro to Quantitative Reasoning
UNIV135 Academic Excellence Seminar
UNIV EXP Discovery Processes in Science
WGSS140 Intro to Women's Studies
WGSS260 Women of Color in the U.S.

AFST 100 Introduction to Africana Studies. (1 course, Social Science)
Designed as the gateway to Africana Studies, this course is an interdisciplinary exploration of the collective experience of blacks in Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean and the United States. The course seeks to provide students an intellectual framework for engagement in a process of self-discovery and for achieving a more global understanding of the unique ways in which Africans and peoples of African descent have constituted our world. The course, which introduces important theoretical approaches and builds critical and analytical skills, provides an overview of the historical, socio-economic and cultural dynamics of black life.

 

ANTH 151. Human Cultures (1 course, SS)
An introduction to the perspectives, methods and ideas of cultural anthropology. Analysis of human diversity and similarities among people throughout the world, both Western and non-Western, through cross-cultural comparison. Topics include: culture and society; ethnographic research; ethnocentrism vs. cultural relativism; how societies adapt to their environment; different forms of marriage and social relationships; male, female and other forms of gender; the social functions of religion; and processes of socio-cultural change. May not be taken pass/fail.

ANTH 153. Human Origins (1 course, SM)
An introduction to physical anthropology and archaeology, showing how biology and culture enable humankind to survive in many different environments. Topics discussed include primate behavior, fossil humans, tools and society, and the relationships between biology and human behavior. May not be taken pass/fail.

ARAB 191. Beginning Arabic I (1 course)
This course employs the communicative approach to language learning, stressing correct pronunciation, aural comprehension, and basic speaking ability. The major components of each chapter are vocabulary, story, culture, grammar, reading comprehension, listening comprehension, writing and speaking activities, and snippets of colloquial conversation in the widely used dialects of Egypt, the Levant, and North Africa. Grammar is learned inductively with special attention given to morphology.

ARAB 291. Intermediate Arabic I (1 course, LA)
This course introduces students to Intermediate Arabic, the third course in Modern Standard Arabic. The course employs the communicative approach to language learning, stressing correct pronunciation, aural comprehension, and speaking ability. Grammar is learned inductively with special attention given to morphology. Prerequisite: ARAB 192 or placement.

ARTH 131 Introduction to Art History Ancient to Medieval. (1 course, AH)
This course surveys the major developments in art and architecture from the Paleolithic period through the high Middle Ages. Emphasis falls on the ancient civilizations of the Near East, Egypt, the Aegean, Greece and Rome, the early Christian world, Byzantium, Islam and the Middle Ages in Western Europe. The approach is at once historical, in that visual forms and types of images are studied in their development over time and across cultures, and anthropological, in the sense that cultures are studied at isolated moments as a way of better understanding the significant roles art and architecture play within them. May count towards European Studies minor.

ARTH 132. Introduction to Art History Renaissance to Modern (1 course, AH)
A survey of Western Art from the early Italian Renaissance to modern and contemporary art. We will view and discuss the major works of art from this period in chronological sequence, discussing their place in the larger historical developments of the west, including the political, social, economic, philosophical and theological. We will also discuss and practice some basic modes of art historical analysis. May count towards European Studies minor. Not open to students with credit in ARTH 142.

ARTH 135. East Asian Art Survey II (1 course, AH)
The second half of a 2-semester survey of East Asian Art (from the 14th century to the present) analyzing the major developments in the art and architecture of China, Japan, and Korea over a range of media. We will study some of the various methodologies that can be applied to East Asian Art as well as key themes in the chronological and historical development of visual cultures against the background of political, social, and cultural contexts. Cross-listed with Asian Studies. Note: Students may enroll in East Asian Art Survey II without having taken East Asian Art Survey I.

ARTS 153. Introduction to Painting (1 course, AH)
Designed for the student with little or no prior oil painting experience. This introduction includes development of a basic understanding of oil painting, color principles, line, form and composition. Principles are taught in conjunction with slide presentations and discussions of the painting ideology of past as well as contemporary masters. Generally it is recommended that students take Drawing I before Painting I. Not offered pass/fail.

ARTS 160. Introduction to Digital Art (1 course, AH)
This course investigates software as artistic material and cultural form. Using different platforms and technologies students will gain a tool set of different approaches to begin an art practice in new media/digital art. Students will learn to conceptualize and design their own projects, as well as learn to utilize a variety of software-based art-making strategies in order to resolve these ideas as artworks. No prerequisites are required. Not offered pass/fail.

ARTS 163. Introduction to Photography (1 course, AH)
An introduction to the art of black-and-white photography, this course provides opportunities for learning personal expression, critical thinking, and the aesthetics of photography through darkroom experiences and camera assignments. A 35-millimeter camera with a manual control is required. Some cameras are available for student checkout. Please see the instructor. Not offered pass/fail.

ARTS 170. Introduction to Sculpture (1 course, AH)
An introduction to the concepts and technical skills associated with three dimensional media. The class explores the principles of 3D design, such as structure, organic/inorganic forms and spatial relationships. The curriculum introduces these concepts through a series of projects which develop basic technical skills with a through a variety of materials including clay, plaster, steel, paper and wood. Not offered Pass/Fail.

ARTS 175. Introduction to Ceramics (1 course, AH)
This course is an introduction to art studio focusing on the use of ceramic materials and techniques. The class covers baic art and design principles, idea development through sketching, experimentation and critique, and a range of ceramic techniques including hand building, press molds, wheel forming and surface development. Not offered pass/fail.

ASIA 140. Introduction to Chinese Culture (1 course, AH)
This course introduces the elements of contemporary and traditional Chinese culture. It provides students with a fundamental yet diverse knowledge of China and its culture through examination of its manifestations: political, religious, social, cultural, and economic. Topics include history, traditional belief systems, society, languages, arts and literature, performance traditions, daily life and customs, ethnicity and gender issues, science and technology, business and government.

BIO 101. Molecules, Cells and Genes (1 course, SM)
Includes laboratory. An introduction to genetics, cell biology and molecular biology. Students will examine topics in biological chemistry, cellular structure and function, metabolism and energy flow in cellular systems, Mendelian genetics, and the cell cycle. Note: This course is commonly required for medical school and other health care professions. It does not matter what order you take BIO 101 and BIO 102 in. You may start out in Biology with either course.

BIO 102. Evolution, Organisms and Ecology (1 course, SM)
Includes laboratory. An introduction to the principles and practice of evolutionary biology, population genetics, and ecology. Students will examine topics in natural selection, the modern synthesis, speciation, phylogeny, primary productivity and ecological efficiency. Note: This course is commonly required for medical school and other health care professions. It does not matter what order you take BIO 101 and BIO 102 in. You may start out in Biology with either course.

CHEM 120. Structure and Properties of Organic Molecules (1 course, class and lab, SM)
This course introduces the basics of chemical bonding, structure and behavior in the context of organic molecules. Emphasis is placed on the nature of bonding, how chemists determine structure, the three-dimensional aspects of structure and how molecular structure determines chemical behavior. Lab activities are designed to reinforce class topics while introducing common organic lab techniques, such as liquid-liquid extraction, NMR, IR, GC/MS, and molecular modeling. Prerequisite: high school chemistry or CHEM 100. May not be taken pass/fail. This course is commonly required by schools in the health professions, including medicine. It does not matter what order you take CHEM 120 and CHEM 130 in. You may start out in Chemistry with either course.

CHEM 130. Structure and Properties of Inorganic Compounds (1 course, class and lab, SM)
An introduction to structure, bonding, properties and simple reactions of inorganic compounds. Topics covered include basic quantum theory, bonding theories, molecular and solid state structure and periodic properties of the elements and their compounds. Application of these topics to biological, environmental and geological systems will be stressed. The lab will focus on the synthesis, structure, properties, and reactivity of inorganic substances, including simple ionic substances and coordination complexes. Characterization using infrared and visible spectroscopy is also introduced. Prerequisite: high school chemistry or CHEM 100. May not be taken pass/fail. This course is commonly required by schools in the health professions, including medicine. It does not matter what order you take CHEM 120 and CHEM 130 in. You may start out in Chemistry with either course.

CHEM 170. Stoichiometric Calculations (1/4 course)
A review of the quantitative treatment of chemistry and chemical reactions. Topics include ways to express the absolute and relative amount of chemicals (grams, moles and concentration), balancing chemical reactions, mole-to-mole relationships, limiting reagents and theoretical yields. The course is composed of a series of self-paced modules. There are no class meetings. Prerequisite: high school chemistry or CHEM 100. May not be taken pass/fail. This review course is required for advanced courses in Chemistry.

CHIN 161. Elementary Chinese I (1 course)
The goals for this course are for students to master the pinyin Romanization system and to acquire basic communication skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing Mandarin Chinese. CHIN 161 is open only to beginners in Chinese or those with two years or less of high school Chinese.

CHIN 261. Intermediate Chinese I (1 course, LA)
Course work helps students to develop four linguistic skills (speaking, writing, listening and reading) in Chinese at a more advanced level. Course work emphasizes drills, conversation and grammar. The goals are for students to acquire the following skills: to pronounce modern standard Chinese, to write words using both characters and pinyin Romanization system, to converse in more complicated sentences based on grammatical structures introduced in this course and to write essays. Prerequisite: CHIN 162 or qualifying score on the placement test.

CHIN 361. Advanced Chinese I (1 course, LA)
Reading and discussion of advanced Chinese materials. Exercise in speaking the language and in writing compositions. Prerequisite: CHIN 261 or qualifying score on the placement test.

CLST 100. Greek and Roman Mythology (1 course, AH)
The principal myths and legends of the ancient world, with consideration of the nature of myth, the social origin and evolution of myths, their relation to religion and philosophy and their use in literature and art.

CLST 253. Greek Civilization (1 course, AH)
This course may have one of the following concentrations: A. survey of Greek civilization; B. Greek religion; C. public and private institutions of ancient Greece.

CLST 254. Roman Civilization (1 course, AH)

This course may have one of the following concentrations: A. survey of Roman civilization; B. Roman religion; C. public and private institutions of ancient Rome.

CLST263. Greek, Etruscan and Persian Art and Archaeology (1 course, AH)
This course covers the art and archaeology of the ancient Mediterranean from the end of the Bronze Age (ca. 1100 BC) to the death of Alexander the Great (323 BC). The course examines the major cities, sanctuaries and burial grounds of the Persians, Assyrians, Israelites, Greeks, and Etruscans. Special attention is given to the growth of urbanism and international trade during this period and their effects on material culture. 

COMM 110. Introduction to Theatre (1 course)
This course offers an overview and introduction to the understanding and appreciation of theatre arts by examining foundations of drama as a communicative act. The course also addresses dramatic theory and literature, collaborative theatre artists, and basic production techniques. Students will gain insight into the imaginative and creative process that makes up the art of theatre.

COMM 111. Acting I (1 course, AH)
Grounding in American acting technique, paying particular attention to objective, obstacle, playable action, character analysis, improvisation, and understanding and development of the vocal and physical instruments.

COMM 117. Theatre Production and Design I (1 course)
The theory and practice of technical production and design including: scenery construction, lighting, properties, costume construction and make-up. Laboratory work on University productions.

COMM 123. Public Speaking (1 course)
This course examines the attitudes, methods, and techniques used in effective public speaking. Effective performance required in a variety of speaking situations.

CFT 100. Introduction to Conflict Studies (1 course, SS)
This course surveys the process of conflict, including conflict management, from a multidisciplinary perspective. As such, it deals with the causes, dynamics, types, levels, management functions and outcomes of conflict. The implementation of the course involves, in part, case-study simulations and occasional guest lecturers from various disciplines on campus. This course is a prerequisite for upper-level courses in conflict studies and required for the conflict studies major and minor.

CSC 121. Computer Science I (1 course, SM, Q-course)
This is an introductory course in which problem solving and algorithm development are studied by considering computer science topics, such as computer graphics, graphical user interfaces, modeling and simulation, artificial intelligence and information management systems. Interesting and relevant programming assignments related to these topics are written in a high-level programming language that supports objects. Additional assignments utilize writing and data analysis to reinforce central course concepts and to address related areas of computing, such as ethics, history and the meaning of intelligence. The course meets three hours in class and two hours in laboratory (3-2). Offered each semester. Not offered pass/fail.

ECON 100. Introduction to Economics (1 course, SS, Q-course)
Survey of basic concepts and processes in microeconomics and macroeconomics: production, income, demand, supply, cost, price, market structures, money, government finance and international trade and finance.

EDUC 170. Foundations of the Education (1 course, SS)
(includes field experience) Establishes a liberal arts foundation for teacher preparation with an emphasis on community/school relationships. Explores major philosophical, historical, and sociological points of view in contemporary American education and their influence on educational decisions and systems. Field experience is required, and students should register for lab time concurrently. May not be taken pass/fail.

EDUC 290. Topics: Banned Books (1 course)

ENG 149. Introduction to Creative Writing (1 course, AH)
An introduction to writing and reading fiction and poetry in a workshop setting using the work of contemporary poets and writers as models. May include some creative non-fiction and/or dramatic writing.

ENG 151. Reading and Literature: Poetry, Fiction and Drama. (1 course, AH)
This course explores literature as means of transforming language into art, looking closely at ways that writers explore the relationship between form, content and meaning. It focuses particularly on three primary literary genres, though it may also include a secondary emphasis on others, such as essay and film. The course might also consider adaptation and the way genres evolve over time.  

ENG 161. Reading and Literature: Visual and Digital Narratives. (1 course, AH)
This course explores the way changes in media have influenced literature, focusing on narrative forms that combine verbal, visual, and digital representation, including film, television, interactive fiction, and social media. It will consider the possibilities that new technologies of representation have brought to the art of storytelling and could also explore critical questions of new media literacy, such as production, dissemination, and reception.  

ENG 167. Introduction to Film (1 course, AH)
Designed to develop students' ability to understand and appreciate film as art and to acquaint them with a representative group of significant works and the characteristics of film as a type of literature.  

ENG 171. Reading and Literature: Intercultural Perspectives (1 course, AH)
This course explores literature as a means of understanding difference across boundaries of race, nation, class, gender, or religion. It will feature literary works that foreground a variety of intercultural perspectives, including literature in translation and literature that thematizes difference.  

ENG 181. Reading and Literature: Ethics and Society (1 course, AH)
This course explores literature as a form of social engagement, with the potential to influence our thinking about aesthetic, ethical, or political questions. It considers imaginative writing as a motive force in history through studies of specific works intervening in specific contexts or, more generally, through an analysis of the strategies that writers use to articulate, clarify, and sometimes resolve social or ethical problems.  

ENG 191. Reading and Literature: Science and Technology (1 course, AH)
This course explores literature as a response to scientific and technological change. It considers the ways that new scientific discoveries inspire new visions in literature and the ways, in turn, that imaginative writing inspires new approaches in science. It features literary works that contextualize past scientific and technological advances, interpret and critique changes happening in the present, and imagine the changes that might occur in the future.  

ENG 250. World Literature. (1 course, AH)
A study of literature from both Western and non-Western traditions. Readings may focus on a theme that runs across cultures, a specific historical period or an event that affects a number of cultures.

ENG 255G. Topics: 19th Century Russian Literature. (1 course, AH)

ENG 263. African American Literature. (1 course, AH)
A study of African-American writing, including biographies, essays and polemics as well as drama, fiction and poetry.

ENG 281. British Writers I  (1 course, AH)
This course surveys works of representative British authors from Anglo-Saxon times through the Augustan period. It is designed for students wishing to acquaint themselves with this broad area of British letters.

ENG 283. American Writers (1 course, AH)
A study of representative American authors from the exploration of the New World to the present with attention to the literature of ethnic cultures.

FILM 100. Introduction to Film (1 course, AH)
(cross-listed with ENG 167) Designed to develop students' ability to understand and appreciate film as art and to acquaint them with a representative group of significant works and the characteristics of film as a type of literature.

FILM 241B. Topics: Contemporary Women Filmmakers in France (1 course, AH)
A broad introduction to the works of contemporary French women directors (both established and emerging) through the lens of feminist film theory. Please note that all films are subtitled. 

FREN 101. Elementary French I (1 course)
Introduction to the French language with emphasis on development of proficiency in speaking, listening, reading and writing. The essentials of French grammar. Emphasis on communication and Francophone cultures. FREN 101 is open only to beginners in French or those with two years or less of high school French.

FREN 110. Review of Elementary French (1 course, LA)
Practice in speaking, listening, reading and writing. Review of French grammar and study of Francophone cultures. For those students who have prior experience in French. Satisfies the Group 5 requirement. Open to students who are placed into this level by test results or departmental direction. Not open to those who have credit for FREN 101 or 102.

FREN 201. Intermediate French I (1 course, LA)
Reading, oral practice, composition and further study of grammar and Francophone cultures. Prerequisite: FREN 102 or 110 or qualifying score on the French placement test.

FREN 202. Intermediate French II (1 course, LA)
A continuation of FREN 201. Prerequisite: FREN 201 or qualifying score on the French placement test.

FREN 305. French Conversation and Phonetics (1 course, LA)
Emphasis on oral practice and phonetics. Prerequisite: FREN 202 or qualifying grade on the placement test. Students with recent foreign residence in a French-speaking country must consult with the chair of the department before registering for FREN 305. Not open to heritage speakers of French.

GEOS 105. Earthquakes and Volcanoes (1 course, SM)
An investigation of the theory of plate tectonics and how it explains the distribution of earthquake and volcanic activity throughout the world. Destructive historical earthquakes and volcanic eruptions are examined with consideration of the impact of these disasters on human populations. Advances in the prediction of earthquake and volcanic activity also are evaluated.

GEOS 110. Earth and the Environment (1 course, SM, Q-course)
Includes laboratory. An introduction to the materials that make up the earth and the interplay between constructive and destructive processes that shape the earth, including plate tectonics. Laboratories include mineral and rock identification, field trips, and topographic map interpretation.

GEOS 125. Introduction to Environmental Science (1 course, SM)
An introduction to the study of environmental science. Topics include matter, energy, ecosystems, human populations, natural resources, and the impact of human activity on the natural environment. Special attention is given to current environmental problems including air and water pollution, acid rain, stratospheric ozone depletion, climate change, deforestation, and species extinctions.

GER 111. Elementary German I (1 course)
An introductory program with a variety of learning approaches. Presentation and reinforcement of grammar, pronunciation and idiom through simple reading, guided writing and functional spoken German. An introduction to the German cultural tradition. GER 111 is open only to those without German language background or to those with two years or less of high school German.

GER 112. Elementary German II (1 course, LA)
A continuation of GER 111. Prerequisite: GER 111 or qualifying score on the placement test.

GER 212. Intermediate German II (1 course, LA)
A continuation of GER 211. Prerequisite: GER 211 or qualifying score on the placement test.

GER 307. Introduction to German Literature (1 course, AH)
Experience in the study of literature and German literary history through texts from the 18th century to the present. Students will gain an overview of the historical development of the German tradition. GER 212 or permission of instructor. May count towards European Studies minor.

GRK 101. Elementary Greek I (1 course)
The essentials of grammar and selections from important authors with reading and lectures on the cultural background.

GRK 205. Greek Prose and Poetry (1 course, LA)
Review of grammar and reading from representative Greek authors, usually including Homer or Plato. Prerequisite: GRK 101-102 or placement. May be repeated for credit.

HIST 100. Topics: East Meets West: Hu Shi
An introduction to historical analysis and argumentation. While individual sections will focus on different topics and time periods, in all sections students will investigate a range of sources, methods and historical approaches to the past. Hist 100 may be repeated for credit with different topics.

HIST 107. Introduction to China and Japan. (1 course, AH)

An interdisciplinary introduction to Chinese and Japanese civilizations from their beginning through the mid-19th century, stressing cultural ideals and the social relations of families and classes, including peasants and townsmen, bureaucrats, beggars and bandits, warlords and women.

HIST 109. African Civilizations (1 course, AH)
The precolonial and colonial history of Africa from 1500 to 1945: the early socioeconomic and political organization of African society; problems of state formation; organization of an acephalous society and African production and trade; the impact of capital on the African formation as seen in the slave trade; and the era of legitimate commerce and early capitalist penetration.

HIST 111. European Civilization I--1300-1800 (1 course, AH)

A history of Europe from about 1300 to 1789, including the end of the medieval world, the Renaissance and Reformation, Scientific Revolution, the age of Enlightenment and the French Revolution. Counts toward European Studies minor.

HIST 112. European Civilization II--1789-Present (1 course, AH)
A history of Europe from 1789 to the present, including French Revolution and Napolean, Industrialization, the Age of the Nation States, the struggle among liberal, communist and fascist ideologies, World Wars I and II, postwar reconstruction, decolonization and European integration. Counts toward European Studies minor.

HIST 115. Colonial Latin America (1 course, SS)
The societies and cultures of Latin America from pre-Hispanic times to the early 19th century. Topics include indigenous societies, period of contact and conquest, resistance and accommodation in the emerging colonial regimes and the revolutions for independence. Emphasis on social relations and cultural practices of the diverse Latin American peoples.

HIST 122. Modern Middle East (1 course, SS)
The course surveys the various factors that have shaped the political, religious, cultural and social features of the modern Middle East from 1500 to 2005. Its geographic scope comprises the central provinces and territories of the former Ottoman and Safavid empires: Turkey, Iraq, Syria, Israel, Palestine, Egypt, Arabia and Iran. It will emphasize the historical evolution of Middle Eastern politics from dynastic and religious empires in the 16th century to modern nation-states in the 20th century; the impact of industrial capitalism and European imperial expansion on local societies; and third, the religious, socio-cultural and ideological dimensions of these large-scale transformations.

HIST 252. US-East Asian Relations (1 course, SS)
This course will examine the interactions between the United States and the major countries in East Asia - China, Japan, and Korea - from the 19th century to the present. The topics that will be explored include cultural interactions and changing mutual images, the impact of imperialism, Asian nationalisms, the Pacific War, communism in Asia, the Japanese developmental state, and, more recently, China's rise as a capitalist state with Chinese characteristics.

HIST 257. Ethnicity and Conflict in South Africa (1 course, SS)
The history of South Africa from the 17th century to the present; its relations with neighboring communities; the coming of white settlers; African subjugation and the rise of apartheid; local and foreign reaction to the apartheid state; the process of decolonization; and ethnic and class cleavages in post-Apartheid society.

HIST 263. Founding of United States Civilization (1 course, AH)
A survey of North American history from Columbus through the War of 1812, emphasizing territories that ultimately became part of the United States. Course includes such subjects as European-Indian interaction, African slavery in early America, the development of English colonies, the American Revolution, the U.S. Constitution and politics in the early republic.

HIST 265. 20th Century U.S. History (1 course, SS)
United States social, economic, political and diplomatic history from 1900 to the present.

HIST 290B. Topics: Technology and Change in the Middle East. (1 course)

ITAL 171. Introduction to Italian I (1 course)
Introduction to the Italian language with emphasis on development of proficiency in speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

ITAL 271. Intermediate Italian (1 course, LA)
Second year Italian. First semester. This course emphasizes oral and written expression, listening comprehension and building vocabulary. It also provides an intensive review of grammar. Learning is facilitated by a careful selection of literary texts, such as plays, novels, short stories, celebrated lyrics from opera and contemporary music. A variety of real-life material is also employed, including newspaper and magazine articles, radio and television broadcasts. Students are required to participate and engage in conversation during class. Regular attendance is essential. Daily assignments are required. Pre-requisite: Italian 171 & 172 or permission of a professor of Italian in the Modern Language Department.

ITAL 371. Advanced Italian (1 course, LA)
In this course, students will engage in conversation through film, current events, opera, contemporary music and short stories. Though the course will focus especially on developing the students' oral fluency and writing competence, students will improve their writing, reading, listening-comprehension and oral skills. This course will prepare students for more advanced work in Italian. Prerequisite: ITAL 272


JAPN 151. Elementary Japanese I (1 course)
Introduction to the Japanese language with emphasis on development of proficiency in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. JAPN 151 is open only to beginners in Japanese or those with two years or less of high school Japanese.

JAPN 251. Intermediate Japanese I (1 course, LA)
Further study of Japanese language and practice in speaking, listening, reading and writing. Prerequisite: JAPN 152 or qualifying score on the placement test.

JAPN 351. Advanced Japanese I (1 course, LA)
Readings and discussion of advanced Japanese materials. Exercise in speaking the language and in writing compositions. Prerequisite: JAPN 252 or qualifying score on the placement test.

KINS 100. Introduction to Kinesiology (1 course, SM)
Includes laboratory. Designed to introduce students to the discipline of kinesiology including the major subdisciplines and approaches to studying movement. Laboratory activities are designed to allow for measurement of phenomenon discussed in class, to introduce common laboratory procedures and techniques, and to learn how to collect and analyze data to answer questions of interest in kinesiology.

LAT 123. Elementary Latin I (1 course)
An introduction to Latin grammar with emphasis on the development of reading knowledge. Includes discussions of Roman life and culture.

LAT 140. Review of Elementary Latin (1 course, LA)
Intensive review of Latin grammar with an introduction to Latin literature, including selections from Cicero, Caesar, and Virgil. For those students who have prior experience with Latin. This course prepares students for more advanced reading courses in Latin literature and satisfies the language requirement. Open to students who are placed into this level by test results or departmental direction. Not open to those who have credit for LAT 123 or 124.

LAT 223. Introduction to Latin Prose (1 course, LA)
Combines a thorough review of Latin grammar and the introduction of authentic Latin prose texts. Teaches strategies for translation of Latin prose. Texts may cover a wide range of genres and periods. Prerequisite: LAT 124 or two years of high school Latin (entering students should take the Latin placement exam during orientation) or permission of instructor.

MATH 123. Computational Discrete Mathematics (1 course, SM, Q-course)
An introduction to the concepts of discrete mathematics with an emphasis on problem solving and computation. Topics are selected from Boolean algebra, combinatorics, functions, graph theory, matrix algebra, number theory, probability, relations and set theory. This course may have a laboratory component.

MATH 135. Calculus with Review (1 course)
Extensive review of topics from algebra, trigonometry, analytic geometry, graphing and theory of equations. A study of functions, limits, continuity and differentiability of algebraic and transcendental functions with applications. Note: Math 135 and Math 136 is a full year sequence which is the equivalent of the faster-paced Math 151. 

MATH 141. Stats for Professionals (1 course, SM, Q-course)
This course introduces students to elementary probability and data analysis via visual presentation of data, descriptive statistics and statistical inference. Emphasis will be placed on applications with examples drawn from a wide range of disciplines in both physical and behavioral sciences and humanities. Topics of statistical inference include: confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, regression, correlation, contingency tales, goodness of fit and ANOVA. The course will also develop familiarity with the most commonly encountered tables for probability distributions: binomial, normal, chi-squared, student-t and F.

MATH 151. Calculus I (1 course, SM, Q-course)
A study of functions, limits, continuity, differentiation and integration of algebraic and transcendental functions with elementary applications.

MATH 152. Calculus II (1 course, SM, Q-course)
Techniques of integration, parametric equations, infinite series and an introduction to the calculus of several variables. Prerequisite: MATH 136 or MATH 151.

MATH 223. Foundations of Advanced Mathematics (1 course, SM, Q-course)
An introduction to concepts and methods that are fundamental to the study of advanced mathematics. Emphasis is placed on the comprehension and the creation of mathematical prose, proofs, and theorems. Topics are selected from Boolean algebra, combinatorics, functions, graph theory, matrix algebra, number theory, probability, relations, and set theory. Prerequisite: MATH 123 or MATH 136 or MATH 151 or placement.

MATH 251. Calculus III (1 course, SM, Q-course)
An introduction to the calculus of several variables. Topics include vectors and solid analytic geometry, multidimensional differentiation and integration, and a selection of applications. Prerequisite: MATH 152 or placement.

ML 227. 19th Century Russian Literature (1 course, AH)
The classics of Russian literature, including Alexander Pushkin, Nikolai Gogol, Fedor Dostoevsky, Leo Tolstoy and Anton Chekhov. Relationship of the writer with society, the state and ethical questions. Familiarization with literary terms and movements of the period. No prerequisites. May count towards European Studies and Russian Studies minors. 

FILM 241B. Topics: Contemporary Women Filmmakers in France (1 course, AH)
A broad introduction to the works of contemporary French women directors (both established and emerging) through the lens of feminist film theory. Please note that all films are subtitled. 

MUS 100 Fundamentals of Music Theory (1 course, Arts and Humanities)
A basic course that enables the non-music major to understand the manner in which the elements of music are constructed and combined in order to form a coherent musical expression. Not open to students in the School of Music. 

MUS 102. Music Appreciation (1 course, AH)
A non-technical course designed to give the layman an overview of the development of Western art music, including its major composers, styles and genres. Includes an introduction to the instruments of the orchestra and commonly used musical terms. Required readings, directed listening assignments, required concert attendance. Not open to students in the School of Music.

PHIL 101. Introduction to Philosophy (1 course, AH)
Selected problems of philosophy and some alternative solutions. Readings from contemporary and historical philosophers. 

PHIL 212. History of Western Philosophy: Ancient. (1 course, Arts and Humanities)
Major philosophers and philosophical schools of western philosophy. The course covers the Pre-Socratics through Stoicism and Skepticism. 

PHYS 104. Stars and Galaxies (1 course, SM, Q-course)
Includes laboratory. An introductory course concentrating on the astronomy of stars and stellar systems. Topics to be covered include: properties of stars; stellar evolution; white dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes; the interstellar medium; the Milky Way; galaxies; Hubble's Law; and cosmology. Emphasis is placed on investigating the methods by which astronomers gain knowledge about the universe. Evening laboratory periods will emphasize observation and will help students develop quantitative skills in interpreting data. PHYS 103 and PHYS 104 may be taken in either order. Not open to students with credit in PHYS 300 or 200. Prerequisite: high school algebra and trigonometry.

PHYS 120. Principles of Physics I (1 course, SM, Q-course)
Includes laboratory. An introductory calculus-based course covering fundamental concepts of physics including: momentum, energy, conservation laws, particle interactions, Newton's laws, oscillations, orbits and planetary motion. Laboratory sessions will provide a hands-on opportunity to explore the concepts of physics. This course is designed for students majoring in the sciences and mathematics and those in pre-professional programs in health sciences, medicine, engineering and teaching. Prerequisite or co-requisite: MATH 151. This course is commonly required by schools in the health professions, including medicine.

PHYS 130. Principles of Physics II (1 course, SM, Q-course)
Includes laboratory. This course builds on PHYS 120 and covers fundamental concepts of physics including: electric and magnetic fields, circuits, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic waves, waves, interference and diffraction. Laboratory sessions will provide a hands on opportunity to explore the concepts of physics. This course is designed for students majoring in the sciences and mathematics and those in pre-professional programs in health sciences, medicine, engineering and teaching. Prerequisite: PHYS 120 (students may receive credit for PHYS 120 through the AP Physics test and thus be eligible for PHYS 130. This course is commonly required by schools in the health professions, including medicine.

POLS 110. American National Government (1 course, SS)
This course will serves as an introduction to the American political system. The three branches of the national government and the roles of political parties, elections, public opinion, interest groups, and other political actors will be addressed. Each version of the course will use a different lens to study American National Government: POLS 110A American National Government; POLS 110B American Government: The Political System Today; POLS 110C American National Government: Race and Privilege; POLS 110D American National Government: The Data; POLS 110E American National Government: The Power of Individuals. Only one POLS 110 course may be counted toward degree and major requirements.

POLS 130. Elements of Political Theory (1 course, SS)
This course offers an introduction to selected topics in Political Theory. It covers a range of thinkers, from the ancient Greeks to the Enlightenment thinkers of Europe and closes on a contemporary note that asks us to reflect on the theoretical underpinnings of our time. It explores the political implications and limits of texts by Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Rousseau, Mill, Burke, Marx, and Arendt, reading them in chronological order with an eye toward changes in concerns and concepts across time. May count towards European Studies minor.

POLS 150. Comparative Politics and Government (1 course, SS)
An examination of major theories of comparative politics applicable to liberal democratic, communist and developing Third World systems. Theories of modernization and development, functionalism, systems analysis, dependency and underdevelopment, political economy, state-society relations, corporatism and neo-corporatism in both Western and non-Western settings. May count towards European Studies minor.

POLS 170. International Politics (formerly POLS 270) (1 course, SS)
An analysis of continuity and change in world politics, focusing on the units of analysis; patterns of conflict and competition, cooperation and order, and constraint; the structure of the international system; the international agenda and emerging trends and issues such as globalization and terrorism; and the current state of world order and its future.

PSY 100. Introductory Psychology (1 course, SM)
This course is a thorough survey of the major areas and approaches in psychology. As a discipline, psychology examines how humans and other organisms develop, function and adapt, including such topics as: how the brain and nervous system function; how we sense and perceive information from our environment; how we learn, remember, think about and interact with the world and each other; how we change during development from birth to old age; why we are motivated to act as we do; the factors that make each of us distinct individuals; what causes psychological disorders; and how those disorders are treated. The course places particular emphasis on scientific methodologies within the discipline. This course is a prerequisite for all other courses in the psychology department.

REL 130. Introduction to Religions (1 course, AH)
A basic cross-cultural survey course of major religious traditions, usually Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, Chinese and Japanese religions with comparative references to major Western religions. Particular attention is paid to the thought, scriptures, practices and institutions of these traditions. Not open to students with credit in REL 130E.

REL 130E is a version of REL 130 that focuses on Asian religions. In this course we will survey some of the core teachings, practices and institutions of Hinduism, Buddhism, Shinto, Taoism, Confucianism, Islam and Christianity. Our twin goals will be to secure a basic understanding of the worlds of meaning that are created, expressed, and sustained by these religions and to learn how to reflect critically upon the function of religion in the lives of individuals and communities. We will begin the semester by reading selections from a classic theoretical text to orient ourselves toward a critical and analytical approach to religious phenomena cross-culturally. We will proceed by introducing ourselves to a number of religious traditions through primary and secondary literature as well as audiovisual material--the latter to get a sense of the ritual and material dimensions of religious expression globally. Most important will be the close reading and discussion of representative primary texts in English translation for each of the traditions under consideration. Over the course of the semester we will be introduced to a variety of methodological issues in the academic study of religion and we will address them as they arise naturally from our discussions of the material under consideration. By the end of the course students will have developed a vocabulary for understanding religious phenomena cross-culturally and with an interdisciplinary focus. Not open to students with credit in REL 130.

REL 141. Hebrew Bible (1 course, AH)
This course surveys the diverse literature of Ancient Israel, read in English translation, that came to be recognized as sacred scripture by Judaism and Christianity (known alternatively as Tanakh or Old Testament). The texts are studied within the historical and cultural context of Ancient Israel with an interest in the history and methods of interpretation.

REL 142. New Testament (1 course, AH)
The literature and faith of the New Testament communities studied in the context of the early church and the Judaic and Greco-Roman world.

REL 267 Caribbean Religions and Culture. (1 course, Arts and Humanities)
An exploration of the relationship between Caribbean religious traditions and culture in the development of Caribbean identity and nationhood. It focuses on how the major world religions were modified through the encounter between peoples of Amerindian, African, European and Asian descent. Further, it studies the impact of slavery, emigration, colonialism, and globalization on the emergence of indigenous Caribbean religious traditions (Vodun, Santeria, Rastafari). 

REL 290A Topics: Religion, Death and Mourning. (1 course, Arts and Humanities)

REL 290B Topics: The Bible Now--New Religious Movements. (1 course, Arts and Humanities)

RUS 121. Elementary Russian I (1 course)
Introduction to the Russian language with emphasis on development of proficiency in speaking, listening, reading and writing. Includes work with CD's and video supplements. RUS 121 is open only to beginners in Russian or those with two years or less of high school Russian.

RUS 221. Intermediate Russian I (1 course, LA)
Continued development of proficiency in Russian with focus on key points in style, word formation, grammar and speaking. Includes work with CD's and video supplements. Prerequisite for RUS 221: RUS 122 or qualifying score on the placement test. May count towards Russian Studies minor.

RUS 224. Reading Russian (1 course, LA)
This course develops a number of reading techniques and provides intensive work in word-formation and syntax. A wide variety of non-fiction texts--including journal and newspaper articles, scientific and popular works--are examined. Prerequisite or co-requisite: RUS 221. May count towards Russian Studies minor.

SOC 100. Contemporary Society (1 course, SS)
An introduction to sociology: its questions, concepts and ways of analyzing social life. The focus is on how human societies organize themselves; how culture, socialization, norms, power relations, social institutions and group interaction affect the individual; and how, in turn, societies are transformed by human action. Of particular concern are problems facing contemporary societies. Not open to seniors or for Pass-Fail credit.

SPAN 131. Elementary Spanish I (1 course)
Introduction to the Spanish language with emphasis on development of proficiency in speaking, listening, reading and writing. The essentials of Spanish grammar. Emphasis on communication and Hispanic cultures. SPAN 131 is open only to beginners in Spanish or those with two years or less of high school Spanish.

SPAN 140. Intensive Elementary Spanish (1 course, LA)
Accelerated review of Spanish grammar and study of Hispanic cultures. Practice in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. For those students who have prior experience in Spanish. Satisfies the Group 5 requirement. Open to students who are placed into this level by test results or departmental direction. Not open to those who have credit for SPAN 131 or 132.

SPAN 231. Intermediate Spanish I (1 course , LA)
Reading, oral practice, composition and further study of grammar and Hispanic cultures. Prerequisite: SPAN 132 or SPAN 140 or qualifying score on the placement test.

SPAN 330. Spanish Conversation and Phonetics (1 course, LA)
Emphasis on oral practice and phonetics. Prerequisite: SPAN 232 or qualifying grade on the Spanish placement test. Students with recent foreign residence in a Spanish-speaking country must consult with the chair of the department before registering for SPAN 330. Not open to heritage speakers of Spanish.

SPAN 332. Spanish Reading and Grammar (1 course, LA)
Advanced reading techniques, including grammar review and composition. Prerequisite: SPAN 232 or qualifying grade on the placement test.

UNIV 101. Introduction to Quantitative Reasoning (1 course)
This course is designed to develop students' ability to reason with quantities through solving problems in arithmetic, algebra, probability, statistics, logic and geometry. Students explore attitudes about and approaches to quantitative work, and learn effective study techniques. The course helps prepare students for the Q course requirement. May not be counted toward a major in Mathematics. May not be taken Pass/Fail.

UNIV 135. Academic Excellence Seminar (1 course)
This course is designed to support students in their development as learners through readings, reflective writing, and class discussion. Topics covered include active reading, taking good notes, preparing for exams, and time management. Students will be encouraged to explore their strengths as scholars, to address their weaknesses and to become more engaged in the learning process. 

UNIV EXP. Discovery Processes and Paradigm Shifts in Science (1 course, SM)

This course will introduce students to multiple scientific disciplinary perspectives in the context of exciting discoveries in science and their subsequent impacts on society. The course will have multiple modules taught by different faculty members from at least three different science and math departments. Each module will examine a disciplinary approach to hypotheses, data collection, and interpretation so students can better understand, and even experience, the discovery process. Faculty members will coordinate transitions between these modules as well as assessment across modules, and students will compare and contrast the disciplinary approaches to gain a more sophisticated understanding of how science is conducted in different fields. The course will also emphasize the relevance of the discoveries to students' lives.

The course counts toward the Science and Mathematics distribution requirement but, because of its interdisciplinary focus, not toward any specific science or mathematics major. This course is not open to Science Research Fellows because HONR 192 addresses similar interdisciplinary goals.

WGSS 140 Introduction to Women's Studies. (1 course, Social Science)
This course introduces some key issues in contemporary women's studies and provides a starting vocabulary and background in the field. Because Women's Studies is an interdisciplinary field, readings come from a number of different areas, including literature, history, philosophy, psychology and sociology.

WGSS 260 Women of Color in the United States. (1 course)
The course draws on the disciplines of history, sociology, anthropology and literary study to offer an in-depth look at the experiences and concerns of women of color, with an emphasis on hearing women's voices. The course is divided approximately in thirds: accounts of the experiences of various ethnic groups (e.g., African-American, Native American, Asian); issues facing women of color in the U.S. today (e.g., culture, the body, family, work); and theory. The class involves frequent writing (formal and informal), including a research paper and in-class presentations.