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Upcoming & Current Courses in Philosophy

Here are the courses the department is offering now and next semester, along with their instructors' descriptions. General descriptions of all DePauw courses in philosophy, along with major and minor requirements, may be found under All Courses.

Philosophy courses for Fall 2016

(Spring 2016 course descriptions are below.)

PHIL 101A: INTRO TO PHILOSOPHY
Professor Erik Wielenberg, 2:50-3:50 MWF
This course introduces students to some of the central topics and methods of philosophy. The course will focus on these questions: What is free will, and do we have it? Do we have non-physical minds or souls? What are the legitimate limits of the State’s power over its citizens? Is civil disobedience ever morally permissible and, if so, under what circumstances? Does God exist? The readings for the course are drawn from a bewildering variety of classic and contemporary sources and include works by Plato, Martin Luther King Jr., C.S. Lewis, Patricia Churchland, Martha Nussbaum, Marilyn Adams, and Richard Dawkins. The requirements include tests, a paper, and unannounced reading quizzes.

PHIL 101B: INTRO TO PHILOSOPHY
Professor Jeremy Anderson, 10:20-11:20 MWF
We will consider several important topics in philosophy such as our knowledge of the world outside our minds, God’s existence, human freedom, and how we should live. To do so we will read, discuss, and critique philosophical works from ancient times to the present. Requirements will include written responses to readings, short papers, exams, participation, and possibly a presentation.

PHIL 101C: INTRO TO PHILOSOPHY
Professor Andrea Sullivan-Clarke, 1:40-2:40 MWF
In this course, we will examine some of the most interesting topics in the Western philosophical tradition.  Intended as a general introduction to philosophy, this course introduces students to its methods, some of its canonical source material, and some of its key questions.  During the term, we will consider such topics as whether we can have knowledge of the external world; the nature of justice; how the mind figures in the physical world; whether we are truly free; and how we ought to live our lives.  Not only will the course be devoted to these topics, it will also be a “tutorial” of sorts for students who may be interested in pursuing philosophy as a major or a minor.  For example, it will address “what is philosophy?”, and “how does one go about doing it?”  For the non-majors (or for those who don’t yet know what they want to do), we will connect what we learn in the class with other disciplines, and recognize how philosophical modes of thinking and arguing (with its focus on clarity, criticism, and rigor) can be used to great effect in other disciplines.

PHIL 209A: TPS: DARWIN
Professor Jeff Dunn, 1:40-2:40 MWF
In The Origin of Species, Darwin presents a compelling argument for the theory of evolution by natural selection, a theory with tremendous explanatory power. This theory is critically important to understanding the biological sciences. But Darwin's ideas have been influential in other areas, including politics, ethics, computer science, psychology, and religion. In this course we will consider Darwin's arguments, his theory, and the controversies and impact of Darwinian ideas both inside and outside of biology. Requirements for this course include active participation, writing assignments, and exams.

PHIL 209B: TPS: ETHICS BOWL
Professor Marcia McKelligan, 2:50-3:50MWF and 7:00-950 pm T
In this class, we will prepare for the regional Intercollegiate Ethics Bowl competition at Marian University on November 12, 2016.  I hope to have two teams of 5-6 enter the competition.  To prepare we will cover the basics of ethical theory and then explore the particular moral and social policy questions raised in the 15 cases that will be made available in early September.  Each student will take the lead on three cases, doing appropriate research, formulating a position and constructing a solid argument for that position.  All cases will be discussed in detail by all members of the class.  We will meet as a group for 3 to 6 hours a week (perhaps more once in a while). Students will write several drafts of papers that will form the basis of their case presentations.  Those drafts will be energetically (but charitably and in a friendly way) critiqued by other members of the class.  One goal will be for a DePauw team to win or place highly enough in the regional competition to earn a bid to the national competition in Dallas in February.  The more significant goals will be to learn in depth about timely and important moral issues, hone your argumentative skills, and gain experience and confidence in the oral presentation and defense of your ideas.  Some of you may already be familiar with the Ethics Bowl competition.  This is the first time that participation is being offered as a full-credit course. Instructor's permission is required to enroll in the course.  Please see me as soon as possible so that I can answer your questions and we can determine if this class is a good option for you.  You can learn more about Ethics Bowl at http://appe.indiana.edu/ethics-bowl/ethics-bowl/.

 

PHIL 212A: HISTORY OF WESTERN PHILOSOPHY - ANCIENT
Professor Rich Cameron, 10:00-11:30 TR
We survey the origins of Western philosophy through a close textual and philosophical investigation of core texts. Themes covered include the birth of philosophical method (epistemology), the nature of being and the possibility of change (metaphysics), and how, by our own lights, we think we ought to live our lives (ethics). The survey covers thinkers from the presocratics through the Hellenistic period with special emphasis on Parmenides, Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle.

PHIL 230A: ETHICAL THEORY
Professor Erik Wielenberg, 9:10-10:10 MWF
This course is devoted to an examination of some of the central questions in theoretical ethics. Specifically, we will consider each of the following questions: What makes a human life good for the one who lives it? What is the nature of good (and evil) character? What makes morally right acts right? What is the relationship, if any, between living a moral life and living a life that is good for you? We will critically examine both historical and contemporary attempts to answer each of these questions. The readings include some classics of ethical philosophy by Plato, Aristotle, Confucius, Immanuel Kant, and John Stuart Mill, some works of fiction, such as Anthony Burgess’s A Clockwork Orange, and Cormac McCarthy’s The Road, plus a smattering of shorter pieces from philosophy, psychology, and economics. The requirements include tests, a paper, and unannounced reading quizzes.

PHIL 230B: ETHICAL THEORY
Professor Jeremy Anderson, 12:30-1:30 MWF
The question, "What should I do?" is ubiquitous for us. Clearly, in most situations, some choices are better than others. Further, various explanations can be given for why some choices are better, and some explanations are better than others. In this course we will consider several major types of ethical theory -- that is, explanations for why some choices are better -- and examine their features, merits, and weaknesses.  If time permits we may also consider various controversial issues such as abortion, euthanasia, and war. Requirements will include exams, papers, a presentation, and participation.

PHIL 232A: ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS
Professor Jen Everett, 9:10-10:10 MWF
Environmental ethics is a subfield of philosophy which studies the extent of, limits to, and grounds for our moral obligations with respect to the more-than-human world. It is also a practical, interdisciplinary field concerned with identifying and facilitating environmentally ethical behaviors, policies, and social systems. This course aims to do justice to both aspects of the field (and to advance the civic engagement goals of a liberal education) by discussing key works, concepts, and theories in environmental philosophy and by grounding these ideas in real-world environmental problems.

PHIL 233A: ETHICS & BUSINESS
Professor Keith Nightenhelser, 12:40-2:10 TR
Ethics and Business will apply the major normative theories of the Western philosophical tradition--virtue ethics, deontology, and utilitarianism--to the special circumstances of business, and mostly to the special circumstances of for-profit corporations, although much of the course also will apply to other business forms such as partnerships and single proprietorships, and to non-profit corporations.  These special circumstances will include the obligations of a business to its different stakeholders--owners, customers, employees, and bystanders--the problems posed by the question of who to hold responsible when a corporation causes harm, the problems posed by operating internationally in different legal and social environments, how to address externalities such as the environment and broad social consequences of business operations, whistleblowing situations, the proper use of business power to influence parties such as government officials (via expertise, lobbying, or direct support) or children (via advertising), principal-agent problems, and what individual associates of businesses need to think about in order to find their way in the complex situations in which their employment may place them.  Ethics and Business is an introductory applied philosophy course, and has no prerequisites.

PHIL 234A: BIOMEDICAL ETHICS
Professor Marcia McKelligan, 12:40-2:10 TR
This course examines a wide range of moral and social policy questions that arise in the context of medical research and the practice and business of medicine. We will examine claims about physician responsibilities such as truth-telling, confidentiality, and respecting patient autonomy. We will look at the concept of informed consent in medical research on human subjects and concerns raised about experimentation on animals. We will look at an array of life-and-death decisions that physicians and patients face: abortion, treatment or termination of defective infants, euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. We will also explore many of the moral challenges generated by such biotechnological capabilities as genetic screening, prenatal genetic diagnosis, and techniques of assisted reproduction. We will consider, too, some of the pressing social issues related to scarcity and allocation of medical resources, such as increasing the supply of organs for transplant and determination of who gets what in times of crisis such as a pandemic. While we will focus most on American health care, we will not neglect global problems. Finally, we raise the question asked by Tom Brokaw in one of the 2008 presidential debates: is health care a privilege, a right or a responsibility? And what do the possible answers to that question suggest about our national health care? The readings are drawn from an anthology of recent articles by philosophers, physicians and legal scholars. The class will be discussion-based. There will be short papers, possibly a test, a term paper and at least one class presentation.

PHIL 242A: PHILOSOPHY OF SEX & GENDER
Professor Dan Shannon, 12:30-1:30 MWF
Traditional and contemporary theories on the nature of love, sex, and marriage will be discussed. We will also examine arguments concerning feminism, pornography, and the nature of homosexuality. There will be several writing assignments, including two major papers; class participation will be extensive. This course may count towards the European Studies interdisciplinary minor. May not be taken pass-fail.

PHIL 251A: LOGIC ‘Q’
Professor Jeff Dunn, 8:00-9:00 MWF
This course is an introduction to symbolic logic. The main goal is to familiarize you with certain formal methods for representing and evaluating deductive arguments. The course covers both sentential logic and predicate logic, with work equally divided between translating sentences into formal notation, and constructing formal proofs. Time permitting, we will consider the limits of deductive logic and consider some basic inductive logic. Requirements for this class include regular homework assignments, exams, and a final project. May not be taken pass-fail.

PHIL 251B: LOGIC ‘Q’
Professor Jeff Dunn, 9:10-10:10 MWF
This course is an introduction to symbolic logic. The main goal is to familiarize you with certain formal methods for representing and evaluating deductive arguments. The course covers both sentential logic and predicate logic, with work equally divided between translating sentences into formal notation, and constructing formal proofs. Time permitting, we will consider the limits of deductive logic and consider some basic inductive logic. Requirements for this class include regular homework assignments, exams, and a final project. May not be taken pass-fail.

PHIL 251C: LOGIC ‘Q’
Professor Ash Puzzo, 1:40-2:40 MWF
What follows from what and why?  Logic is the formal study of inference and has played a central role in both philosophical and scientific inquiry for over 2,000 years.  We begin with an examination of propositional logic from both a syntactic and semantic perspective.  We will then transition into a study of quantificational logic including identity.  At the end of the semester we will do some readings in both metaphysics and ethics so the student may see how logic is used in philosophy.  In addition to homework and exams the student will have the opportunity to write a paper on her choice of the readings at the end of the semester.  For questions please do not hesitate to email me: ashleypuzzo@depauw.edu

PHIL 309A: TPS: NATURAL LAW, PROPERTY AND PERSON
Professor Dan Shannon, 12:40-3:30 T
This course will examine both classical and modern versions of natural law theory with an emphasis on the issue of whether there are natural rights to property and inalienable rights of a person. For the classical formulation we will look at Plato and Saint Thomas Aquinas; for the modern versions will look at Pufendorf, Locke, Hume, Kant, and Hegel. Some of the questions concerning "persons" will include the distinction between a natural and artificial person. May an innocent person be killed morally? Is there a distinction between formal and material innocence? Some questions concerning "property" will include: how does one acquire a property right?  How may property rights be alienated? Is there a moral obligation to protect and care for one's own and another's property? May you retain a property right after you cease to exist? There will also be some discussion of the relationship between natural rights and divine rights, and how natural rights may be used to lay down principles, or postulates, of universal human rights. This course may count towards the European Studies interdisciplinary minor. Prerequisite: one course in Philosophy or permission of instructor.  May be repeated for credit with different topics.

PHIL 309B: TPS: GODLESS UNIVERSE
Professor Erik Wielenberg, 2:20-3:50 TR
Suppose that we are living in a Godless universe; what are the implications of this?  In this course we will carefully examine this question, paying particular attention to the implications of a godless universe for morality.  Among the topics to be considered are theistic attempts to ground morality in God, atheistic moral realism, and the nature of contemporary societies with very small proportions of religious believers.  We will read part or all of God: A Debate between a Christian and an Atheist, by William Lane Craig and Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, Robert Adams’ Finite and Infinite Goods, Phil Zuckerman’s Society without God, Erik Wielenberg’s Value and Virtue in a Godless Universe, and others.  The requirements include some short writing assignments, a term paper, a mid-term exam, and a final exam.  Both theistic and atheistic points of view will be taken seriously and treated with respect.  Pre-requisite: One class in philosophy or permission of instructor.

PHIL 419: MAJOR PHILOSOPHERS: HOBBES
Professor Jeremy Anderson, 2:20-3:50 MW
Thomas Hobbes’ picture of a chaotic, miserable “state of nature” is one of the most famous ideas in political theory and international relations. He was a comprehensive and systematic thinker whose work encompassed not only politics but mathematics, physics, psychology, ethics, and religion. In this course we’ll explore his system of thought, mainly by studying his best-known work, Leviathan, but also some lesser-known work and secondary literature. Work will include written responses to readings, participation, maybe an exam, some papers, and presentations. Prerequisite: two courses in philosophy or instructor's permission.  May be repeated for credit with different topics. Counts toward European Studies Minor.

PHIL 470A: INDEPENDENT STUDY
Staff, Arr
Directed studies in a selected field or fields of philosophy. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

PHIL 491A: SENIOR THESIS
Staff, Arr
This course provides an opportunity for outstanding philosophy majors to produce a substantial (normally 30+ pages in length) research paper on an important topic in philosophy. Students who are planning to do graduate work in philosophy are encouraged to take this course. Students must apply to the department for approval to undertake this project. Accepted students will be assigned a thesis advisor who will set the schedule for the completion of the paper. The course culminates with an oral defense of the completed paper. Prerequisites: Major in Philosophy, senior status, and departmental approval. May not be taken pass/fail.

 


philosophy courses for Spring 2016

(Fall 2016 course descriptions are above.)

PHIL 101A: INTRO TO PHILOSOPHY 
Professor Jeremy Anderson, 9:10-10:10 MWF
We will consider several important topics in philosophy such as our knowledge of the world outside our minds, God’s existence, human freedom, and how we should live. To do so we will read, discuss, and critique philosophical works from ancient times to the present. Requirements will include written responses to readings, short papers, exams, participation, and possibly a presentation.

PHIL 101B: INTRO TO PHILOSOPHY 
Professor Erik Wielenberg, 2:50-3:50 MWF 
This course introduces students to some of the central topics and methods of philosophy. The course will focus on these questions: What is free will, and do we have it? Do we have non-physical minds or souls? What are the legitimate limits of the State’s power over its citizens? Is civil disobedience ever morally permissible and, if so, under what circumstances? Does God exist? The readings for the course are drawn from a bewildering variety of classic and contemporary sources and include works by Plato, Martin Luther King Jr., C.S. Lewis, Patricia Churchland, Martha Nussbaum, Marilyn Adams, and Richard Dawkins. The requirements include tests, a paper, and unannounced reading quizzes.

PHIL 101C: INTRO TO PHILOSOPHY 
Professor Daniel Shannon, 12:30-1:30 MWF
This course is a historical introduction to philosophy. We will cover themes, ideas, and arguments from the ancient Greeks to contemporary existentialism and feminism. The main areas of philosophy (logic, epistemology, ethics, and metaphysics) will be covered. The course involves a mixture of lectures and class discussions. There will be an emphasis on writing argumentative essays. There will be several small tests.

PHIL 101D: INTRO TO PHILOSOPHY 
Professor Richard Cameron, 10:20-11:20 MWF
Our course begins with critical examination of the conception of philosophy which seems to have inspired Socrates’ outrageous claim that the unexamined life is not worth living. Socratic philosophy involves the critical investigation of life-orienting and inescapable questions, questions which all of us answer and the answers to which send our lives off in dramatically different directions. The idea is illustrated through critical examination of core questions from the three main branches of philosophy: ethics (e.g., what are our obligations to the world’s poorest people?), epistemology (e.g., what can we know?), and metaphysics (e.g., is there a God?).

PHIL 209A: TPS: ANIMAL ETHICS 
Professor Jennifer Everett, 8:20-9:50 TR
Are humans the only animals with moral rights? Does the suffering of a pig or a chicken matter more than, less than, or the same, morally speaking, as the suffering of a dog, a chimpanzee, or a human? Is it wrong to eat meat? Should animals be used for research? What should we think about hunting, zoos, or rodeos? This course examines theories concerning the moral status of nonhuman animals, the ethics of certain practices of using animals for human purposes, challenges to the legal status of animals as property, and/or questions of ethical activism.

PHIL 209B: TPS: THE EXAMINED LIFE 
‘W’ Professor Richard Cameron, 9:10-10:10 MWF
Socrates famously claimed that the unexamined life is not worth living. But that claim is extremely puzzling -- we all know people who lead unexamined lives that, nevertheless, seem eminently worth living. Was Socrates just wrong, or was he getting at something deeper? If so, what might that deeper meaning be? We'll look at both Platonic texts about Socrates and examples of more contemporary issues calling on us to examine our own lives as we work through this puzzle.

PHIL 209C: TPS: IMMIGRATION POLICY 
Professor Claudia Mills, 12:30-1:30 MWF
This course will examine a series of ethical questions involving immigration, citizenship, national identity, and cultural belonging, with special attention to recent controversies raised by U.S. election rhetoric and the refugee crisis in Europe. Isn’t freedom of movement, including movement across often arbitrarily drawn national boundaries, a fundamental human right? But how can a nation-state exercise its right to sovereignty if it can’t control its own borders and regulate access to the privileges of citizenship? Drawing on social science literature regarding the causes and effects of both historical and contemporary migration, as well as normative principles from leading ethical theories, we will assess the case for open borders as well as the case for limits on immigration. If we do open our borders, what do we owe to those who cross them? Is it morally permissible to establish different degrees of political membership: from citizen, to permanent resident, to temporary guest worker? Is there a moral duty to admit refugees fleeing war and persecution? On whom does this duty fall, and why? How can we best address involuntary migration through human trafficking? What role do race and gender play in migration patterns, and what special ethical issues do they pose for immigration policy? These are only some of the timely and challenging questions we will explore together in this discussion-based class. 

PHIL 216A: EARLY MODERN PHILOSOPHY 
Professor Marcia McKelligan, 10:20-11:20 MWF
A survey of major figures in Continental and British philosophy in the 17th and 18th centuries, with particular attention to problems in metaphysics and epistemology. We read selections from Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume and a little from Kant, not only for their historical interest, but also for what they have to say about perennial philosophical problems. Classes are a mixture of lecture and discussion. Graded work consists of exams and papers. This is a challenging course but essential for those who wish to understand the development of Western philosophical thought. This course may count towards the European Studies interdisciplinary minor.

PHIL 220A: EXISTENTIALISM 
Professor Daniel Shannon, 2:20-3:50 MW
Introductory course in Existentialism. Major writers from both 19th and 20th centuries including Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre and Camus. Issues to be discussed: the meaning of faith, the value of morality, absurdity of life, the relation between being and nothingness.

PHIL 230A: ETHICAL THEORY 
Professor Jeremy Anderson, 12:30-1:30 MWF
The question, "What should I do?" is ubiquitous for us. Clearly, in most situations, some choices are better than others. Further, various explanations can be given for why some choices are better, and some explanations are better than others. In this course we will consider several major types of ethical theory -- that is, explanations for why some choices are better -- and examine their features, merits, and weaknesses. If time permits we may also consider various controversial issues such as abortion, euthanasia, and war. Requirements will include exams, papers, a presentation, and participation.

PHIL 233A: ETHICS & BUSINESS 
Professor Keith Nightenhelser, 12:40-2:10 TR
Ethics and Business will apply the major normative theories of the Western philosophical tradition--virtue ethics, deontology, and utilitarianism--to the special circumstances of business, and mostly to the special circumstances of for-profit corporations, although much of the course also will apply to other business forms such as partnerships and single proprietorships, and to non-profit corporations. These special circumstances will include the obligations of a business to its different stakeholders--owners, customers, employees, and bystanders--the problems posed by the question of who to hold responsible when a corporation causes harm, the problems posed by operating internationally in different legal and social environments, how to address externalities such as the environment and broad social consequences of business operations, whistleblowing situations, the proper use of business power to influence parties such as government officials (via expertise, lobbying, or direct support) or children (via advertising), principal-agent problems, and what individual associates of businesses need to think about in order to find their way in the complex situations in which their employment may place them. Ethics and Business is an introductory applied philosophy course, and has no prerequisites.

PHIL 240A: PHILOSOPHY OF ART 
‘W’ Professor Daniel Shannon, 10:20-11:20 MWF
The Philosophy of Art deals with two main questions. What is art? Whether art is "good"? The first question will be addressed by looking at various theories of art, such as, the Craft Theory, Expressionism, Significant Form, Instrumentalism, and the Institutional Theory. The second question deals with aesthetics (standards of taste) and evaluation through judgment. We will consider theories concerning beauty, emotion, connoisseurship, embodied meaning, and values of belonging to the art world. We will read both those who advance the idea that art has value and is good, and those who contend it does not and has no value. Various arts will be considered, including literature, painting, dance, and architecture. Class discussion is emphasized. There will be quizzes, papers, a final test, and oral or written response pieces.

PHIL 251A: LOGIC ‘Q’ 
Professor Jeffrey Dunn, 8:00-9:00 MWF
This course is an introduction to symbolic logic. The main goal is to familiarize you with certain formal methods for representing and evaluating deductive arguments. The course covers both sentential logic and predicate logic, with work equally divided between translating sentences into formal notation, and constructing formal proofs. Time permitting, we will consider the limits of deductive logic and consider some basic inductive logic. Requirements for this class include regular homework assignments, exams, and a final project. May not be taken pass-fail.

PHIL 251B: LOGIC ‘Q’ 
Professor Ashley Puzzo, 1:40-2:40 MWF
What follows from what and why? Logic is the formal study of inference and has played a central role in both philosophical and scientific inquiry for over 2,000 years. We begin with an examination of propositional logic from both a syntactic and semantic perspective. We will then transition into a study of quantificational logic including identity. At the end of the semester we will do some readings in both metaphysics and ethics so the student may see how logic is used in philosophy. In addition to homework and exams the student will have the opportunity to write a paper on her choice of the readings at the end of the semester. For questions please do not hesitate to email me: ashleypuzzo@depauw.edu

PHIL 351A: ADVANCED LOGIC 
Professor Jeffrey Dunn, 2:50-3:50 MWF
This course extends the study of symbolic logic beyond what is covered in Phil 251 (and other introductory logic courses). We will start with a deeper investigation of sentential logic and predicate logic with a special focus on model theoretic semantics. This will allow us to construct metalogic proofs about these logical systems (for instance, soundness and completeness proofs). We will then investigate extensions of these logical systems. Topics will include identity, function signs, definite descriptions, generalized quantifiers, non-classical logics, modal logics, and counterfactuals. Requirements include regular homework assignments, exams, and a final paper. Prerequisite: successful completion of Phil 251 or permission of instructor.

PHIL 352A: EPISTEMOLOGY 
Professor Jeffrey Dunn, 10:00-11:30 TR
We seem to know various things: that the Colts had a good season last year; that there will be a presidential election in 2016; that 5+7=12; that DNA has a double helical structure. Maybe we don't actually know these things. Even so, we at least seem to have very good reason to believe them. But what is it to know or have a reason to believe something? Since we're often interested in evaluating the beliefs that we (or others) hold, this question seems to be important. Epistemology is the discipline that attempts to answer it. In this course we will cover the central topics within epistemology. We will read some classic work in philosophy by authors such as Plato, Descartes, and Hume, but the majority of reading will be recent work by contemporary philosophers. We will spend most of our time on three books: (1) Epistemology, by Laurence BonJour, (2) Knowledge and Its Place in Nature, by Hilary Kornblith, and (3) Putting Logic in Its Place, by David Christensen.

PHIL 363A: PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION 
Professor Marcia McKelligan, 1:40-2:40 MWF
An exploration of questions relating to the existence and nature of God, and the relation of God to humans and to the universe as a whole. Particular topics include: arguments for and against the existence of God, the attributes of God, the problem of evil, religious and mystical experience, prayer, faith, the possibility of life after death, and the connections among religion, morality and the meaning of life. Readings are drawn from classic and contemporary sources. Written work will include papers and exams. Classes will emphasize discussion and students will take responsibility for leading some class sessions. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy or permission of instructor.

PHIL 469A: PHILOSOPHICAL PROBLEM: PUNISHMENT 
Professor Jeremy Anderson, 12:40-2:10 TR
Our sense that crimes should be punished is so deeply ingrained that to question it may seem nutty. But punishment is also problematic. When we punish we do things that, under other circumstances, are morally wrong and illegal. Further, punishment does not seem to achieve many of its goals very effectively. In this course we will critically examine justifications offered for legal punishment and alternatives to it. We will delve into the long-standing and complex debate over whether and how punishment may be justified, and consider relevant empirical data. Assignments will include papers, a presentation, regular responses to readings, and exams. Prerequisite: two courses in philosophy or permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

PHIL 470A: INDEPENDENT STUDY 
Staff, Time Arranged
Directed studies in a selected field or fields of philosophy. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

PHIL 490A: SENIOR SEMINAR ‘S’ 
Professor Erik Wielenberg, 2:20-3:50 TR
This class is the capstone course for majors in philosophy. It covers a broad range of advanced topics in philosophy; typically three or four topics are covered during the semester. Topics may be treated historically or systematically. The students are responsible for presentations and discussions of the material. Several papers will be assigned. May not be taken pass/fail. Open only to seniors.

PHIL 491A: SENIOR THESIS 
Staff, Time Arranged
This course provides an opportunity for outstanding philosophy majors to produce a substantial (normally 30+ pages in length) research paper on an important topic in philosophy. Students who are planning to do graduate work in philosophy are encouraged to take this course. Students must apply to the department for approval to undertake this project. Accepted students will be assigned a thesis advisor who will set the schedule for the completion of the paper. The course culminates with an oral defense of the completed paper. Prerequisite: Major in philosophy, senior status and departmental approval. May not be taken pass-fail.