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Lobdell, Nicole, PhD

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765-658-4245

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English, Asbury, Room 12
Greencastle, IN
46135

English

Assistant Professor of English

Nicole Lobdell joined the English Department in 2016 as a Visiting Assistant Professor of English. Previously, she was a Marion L. Brittain Fellow in the School of Literature, Media, and Communication at Georgia Tech in Atlanta, GA.

With expertise in Romantic and Victorian literature, Lobdell teaches a range of courses with interests in 19th-century British literature, Gothic literature, science and technology, gender/sexuality studies, and medical humanities. She has recently offered courses on such topics as "The Female Gothic," "Press A to Play: Video Game Narratives," and "Brain on Fire: Medical Narratives."

She has published on Margaret Fuller's Woman in the Nineteenth Century, Mary Shelley's short fictions, and William Blake's poetry. She has also edited special issues of Nineteenth-Century Gender Studies (July 2015), Nineteenth-Century Contexts (December 2015), and most recently Science Fiction Studies for the bicentennial of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (July 2018). Her forthcoming works include a new critical edition of HG Wells's The Invisible Man for Broadview Press (October 2018) and an article on Victorian counterfeiting culture and Christina Rossetti's Goblin Market in Victorian Network (September 2018).

Fall 2018 Courses

ENG 151: Reading Literature: Fiction, Drama, and Poetry (course description)

ENG 255: Tps: "Dead Bodies in Literature, or the Corpse in the Corpus" (course description)

ENG 281: British Writers I: A survey of British literature from 680 CE to 1780 CE (course descrption)

 

Publications

Forthcoming in October 2018 from Broadview Press, a new critical edition of HG Wells's The Invisible Man, co-edited with Nancee Reeves (University of Georgia). This new edition features a critical introduction, footnotes, and seven appendices of historical contexts including  "The Four Endings of The Invisible Man," "Invisibility in Nineteenth-Century Fiction," and "Technology Contexts: Röntgen Rays and Radio Waves." Click here for the Broadview Press publication page.

 

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