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MUS 380

21CM Topics

Investigations of specialized topics in entrepreneurship and music business. These courses expand upon other courses offered in the 21CM curriculum.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Variable

Spring Semester information

Stacy Forsythe

380A: Tps:Alexander Technique for Musicians

The Alexander Technique is a highly effective method for heightening awareness and cultivating whole-body coordination. Learning the Technique can help improve body alignment (posture), boost energy and refine breathing. It also helps musicians allow the release of unnecessary tensions, change habits acquired through years of physical misuse and prevent interference with the delicate mechanisms of balance. This class will focus on the development of oneself in movement -- learning to recognize and improve those habitual patterns of coordination which interfere with the free, efficient and centered use of the body. Students will explore foundational principles of the Technique as they relate to all aspects of musical training and performance, including injury prevention, performance anxiety and long-term wellness.


Peter Seymour

380B: Tps:21st Century Chamber Music Concepts

21st Century Chamber Music Concepts provides a hands on, in depth approach to improvisation, composition, arranging, and forming ensembles with non-traditional, mixed instrumentation. Student ensembles will explore their collective musical identity, while developing the tools to communicate their unique artistic vision within the marketplace of 21st Century chamber ensembles.


Fall Semester information

Staff

380A: 21CM Topics: Chamber Concepts

21st Century Chamber Concepts provides a hands on, in depth approach to improvisation, composition, arranging, and forming ensembles with non-traditional, mixed instrumentation. Student ensembles will explore their collective musical identity, while developing the tools to communicate their unique artistic vision within the marketplace of 21st Century chamber ensembles.


Randy Salman

380B: 21CM Topics: Miles and Trane

Universally claimed as a musical genius, Miles Davis is one of the most influential musicians in the world. For more than 45 years, from 1945 when he first made his mark on the jazz scene until his death in 1991, Miles Davis has been in the front rank of American music. His music has defined jazz for three different generations of listeners.

John Coltrane was a key figure in jazz history, a pioneer in world music, and an intensely emotional force. The immense force of Coltrane's music has inspired poetry, sculpture, and modern dance.

We will view clips from several different videos that include concert footage and interviews with Miles Davis and the musicians with whom he worked. We will also listen to selections from many CDs recorded over his lifetime. These include: Bop recordings from his early period with Charlie Parker in the 1940s; his Birth of the Cool sessions of 1949 and 1950; his recordings with the Classic Miles Davis Quintet including John Coltrane of the 1950s; his collaborations with Gil Evans; his 1959 best-loved and historically pivotal Kind of Blue recording, also with John Coltrane; his Great 1960s Quintet with Herbie Hancock, Tony Williams, Ron Carter, and Wayne Shorter; and the post-1968 experiments, which displayed a blend of the jazz tradition, funk music, and the music of India and South America. The music of John Coltrane will focus on the Classic Quartet of the 1960s with McCoy Tyner, Elvin Jones, and Jimmy Garrison, as well as his influential Giant Steps recording.


Randy Salman

380C: 21CM Topics: Jazz Vocalists

This course will focus on many of the most important jazz vocalists of the past, including Bessie Smith, Billie Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughan, Dinah Washington, Nancy Wilson, Carmen McRae, Jimmy Rushing, Louis Armstrong, Joe Williams, Frank Sinatra, Tony Bennett, Johnny Hartman and Ray Charles, among others. Students will be asked to give presentations on some of their favorite current vocalists and it is my hope to have all students perform and record one jazz standard.

One goal is to have the students become familiar with the music and styles of the individuals studied. However, since learning listening skills is essential before identifying the style differences that make jazz history interesting, some time will be spent on how to listen to jazz.

Finally, since the performers have been influenced by social and historical forces peculiar to America, an understanding of their life experiences is essential.