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UNIV 183

Off-Campus Extended Studies Course

Faculty-led domestic and international study and service courses that provide students opportunities to explore and experience other cultures, learn in new environments, develop skills not readily acquired elsewhere, and deepen their understanding of the global community. Curricular offerings earn .5 course credit and count toward satisfying the Extended Studies requirement; co-curricular offerings do not carry academic credit but do count toward the Extended Studies requirement.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
variable

Winter Term information

Jennifer Schepers

183DB: DePauw-Kelley Program (off-campus)

DePauw - Kelley Program
Develop the leadership skills to thrive in any career

Meeting Times: Daily; 1 week at IU campus starting Wednesday January 4, remainder of the time at DePauw with site visits to companies in Indianapolis.

Housing: Move into DePauw on-campus residence on TUESDAY January 3. Bus will leave for Bloomington at 8 am on Wednesday morning. Bloomington hotel accommodations will be made for students.

Estimated Fees: $2000 (financial support will be provided for those that have financial need).

Prerequisites: Not open to First-Year Students; Must be in attendance for the entire session; Business attire required for some portions of the course.

Gain a holistic understanding of how an organization operates from every angle--operations, marketing, ethics, finance, and management--through hands-on experience with case studies and technical practice using Excel. You will learn from Kelley's best professors as you complete a consulting project for an Indiana business or nonprofit. Upon completion of course work, students are invited to attend the Kelley School Career Fair.

In addition, career coaching sessions will be led by visiting employers, alumni, and Hubbard Center staff. In these sessions, you will learn to articulate your skills and strengths as a liberal arts student for a variety of industries and develop a robust on-line professional portfolio.

Over 50 students have participated in this elite course created for DePauw students, securing internships in multiple industries as a direct result of the class. DePauw - Kelley Program students are guaranteed up to $3000 to support unfunded internships in the area of non-profits, government and start-ups in the state of Indiana.

Hear what alumni from last year's class have to say about the program:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tk9JROyoDxY

For more information on program costs and how to apply for the program, paste this URL into your web browser:

https://depauw-horizons.symplicity.com/index.php?s=programs

Enter "Winter" into the Term search box.


Barbara Timm

183DC: O'Keefe Country: Winter Term at Ghost Ranch (off-campus)

Located in the beautiful and isolated mountains of Northern New Mexico--the home and inspiration for painter Georgia O'Keefe--Ghost Ranch affords students the unique opportunity for complete immersion in a rich, multi-faceted cultural experience, and intensive study with talented faculty in one of the following areas: Sustainability Practices: Agriculture & the Earth, Black and White Landscape Photography; Art & Writing: The Spirit of Place; Introduction to Silversmithing in the Southwest Tradition; An Inner Journey: Still the Mind, Open the Heart; Indigenous Pottery and Southwest Culture; Southwest Weaving and Culture; and Outdoor Adventure at Ghost Ranch. Students will have opportunities on the ranch to meet with area residents and artisans, medicine men, monks, ranchers and local personalities. In addition to the courses listed above, students will participate in a variety of cultural excursions: visits to Native American pueblos for ceremonial dances, Dar al Islam (a Muslim Mosque), Bandelier National Monument (home to cliff-dwelling ancient Puebloans), Los Alamos (home to the first nuclear weapon), Earth Ship (a self-sufficient community that is off the grid), the Rio Grande Gorge, and other sites exploring the natural and human history of the area. Optional excursions include skiing in Los Alamos, shopping/site seeing in Taos, and hiking in the 20,000+ acres surrounding the ranch. Students will also have the opportunity to visit Santa Fe over winter term, and take full advantage of the many museums, galleries, and restaurants in the city.

For more information on program costs and how to apply for the program, paste this URL into your web browser:

https://depauw-horizons.symplicity.com/index.php?s=programs

Enter "Winter" into the Term search box.


Peter Graham

183DD: Sundance and Slamdance Film Festivals (off-campus)

Every year in January, thousands of filmmakers, screenwriters, actors, agents and producers make a winter pilgrimage to Park City, Utah, for two of America's most important and prestigious film festivals: The Sundance and Slamdance Film Festivals. If Hollywood is the Mecca of slick, multi-million dollar studio movies, then Park City is the homeland for independent film.

This Winter Term class will give students a working vocabulary to talk and write about film. Students will learn important techniques of film, including photography, camera angles, camera movement, lighting, editing, and sound. Class will begin in Greencastle with a week-long course in the history of independent film. In addition to reading excerpts from film textbooks, magazines, and newspapers, we will watch some of the great work that has emerged from these festivals over the years. In order to study independent films, students will also need to know some background of the Hollywood Studio System, which we cover during the first days of class.

Once settled in Park City, students will see at least 12 movies, review them, and post those reviews on the our class blog. There will be a wide variety of films shown at these festivals--from feature films, dramas and documentaries, to foreign films, animation, and shorts. The group will also attend and report on two film workshops, technology seminars, and/or lectures by film professionals such as programmers, film critics, directors, and film composers. Students will blog on these events as well. Finally, students will interview at least one professional filmmaker or actor and write a formal profile of 6-7 pages.

For more information on program costs and how to apply for the program, paste this URL into your web browser:

https://depauw-horizons.symplicity.com/index.php?s=programs

Enter "Winter" into the Term search box.


Khadija Stewart

183IA: Science and Research Development in India and Sri Lanka (off-campus)

The purpose of this course is to study science and technology development in two countries: India and Sri Lanka. Of the two countries, India is the more known country. However, India's known more for technology outsourcing than for technology development and research. During the last few years, the Indian government has been encouraging more development and research and the amount of publications and production in the country has increased significantly. The goal of this trip is to uncover the science research initiatives in India by visiting some of the top research universities and institutions including the legendary India Institute of Technology (IIT) and the Department of Science and Technology (a government agency that encourages research in science and technology) in new Delhi.

Sri Lanka is the lesser known of the two countries. Sri Lanka is also a destination for technology and IT outsourcing, though less popular than India. Sri Lanka's government is actively trying to move the country towards science research and development, which is evidenced by the creation of the National Science Agency of Sri Lanka. Important visits that will be the highlight of this course include a visit to the Ministry of Technology and Research, the National Science Agency of Sri Lanka and Sri Lanka Institute of Science and Technology.

For more information on program costs and how to apply for the program, paste this URL into your web browser:

https://depauw-horizons.symplicity.com/index.php?s=programs

Enter "Winter" into the Term search box.


Douglas Harms

183IB: Winter Term in Service: Nicaragua (off-campus)

A significant portion of our time in Nicaragua will be spent working with Nicaraguans in the community of Zacataloza on a service project constructing a school in the community. Through this context, the primary objective of the course will be to gain an understanding of the Nicaraguan people, particularly their situation within the context of recent history and the complex relationships they have with the United States. Studying this relationship between our two countries will help students gain a perspective on the role we (as US citizens) have played and are currently playing in the lives of people in Latin America.

For more information on program costs and how to apply for the program, paste this URL into your web browser:

https://depauw-horizons.symplicity.com/index.php?s=programs

Enter "Winter" into the Term search box.

For more information on program costs and how to apply for the program, paste this URL into your web browser:

https://depauw-horizons.symplicity.com/index.php?s=programs

Enter "Winter" into the Term search box.


Marius Conceatu

183IC: Global Crossroads: East Meets West in Vietnam (off-campus)

This 2017 Winter Term culture course in Vietnam blends history, architecture, art, and personal experience to provide a gateway to the intricacies of an ancient and complex culture. A veritable shock of civilizations, with its rich and durable French cultural influence, Vietnam is an ideal case study of tumultuous relations between the East and the West. The course offers students theoretical as well as practical tools which will allow them to forge not simply an academic and intellectual appreciation of Vietnamese culture and its significance for contemporary America, but a deeply personal understanding of modern-day Vietnam. Critical texts on history and politics, works of fiction, and a number of films prepare students for a journey into the country's cities and natural landscapes which they will document in photo-video journals. We assess the Francophone imprint on Vietnam by looking at cultural production (architecture, food, language, literature, etc.) and by making sense of its developments and underpinnings. The ultimate goals of the course are to equip students with a critical framework allowing them to engage meaningfully with a foreign culture; to facilitate the students' acquisition of relevant knowledge through direct contact with the culture examined; and to help them develop the skills necessary to both express subjective impressions and to reflect on them critically.

For more information on program costs and how to apply for the program, paste this URL into your web browser:

https://depauw-horizons.symplicity.com/index.php?s=programs

Enter "Winter" into the Term search box.


Robert Hershberger

183ID: Contemporary Cuban Identities (off-campus)

This course is designed to provide a cultural and political introduction to Cuba with a specific focus on contemporary Cuban identities. We will actively endeavor to understand the perspectives of Cubans (workers, students, professors, artists, social and political organizations, and others) and to experience contemporary Cuban culture firsthand through site visits to old Havana, museums and historical places, community-based organizations, and rural communities. Site visits will take place daily and provide concrete illustrations of the critical issues with which we will engage, including politics, sexuality and gender, healthcare and social services, urban life and community development, and linguistic heritage in Cuba. Importantly, we will consider the stakes of these issues as they relate to the historic and rapidly changing nature of relations between Cuba and the United States, thus seeking to contextualize the potential profits and perils of increasing American diplomatic, economic, and social engagement with the island, as well as the ways in which contemporary Cuban citizens and their identities are implicated in these changes.

For more information on program costs and how to apply for the program, paste this URL into your web browser:

https://depauw-horizons.symplicity.com/index.php?s=programs

Enter "Winter" into the Term search box.


Clarissa Peterson

183IF: Life After Mandela: South Africa (off-campus)

This course is designed to expose students to South African life since the death of Mandela. When the news of Mandela's death traveled across the world, media outlets broadcast a South Africa that was harmonious. In these images, people (black and white) lived together and suggested that South Africans now enjoyed a life that consisted of interracial harmony. On the contrary, many reports in the smaller media outlets alerted the world to the wide racial gaps in the country. They lamented the different unemployment rates, income gaps, health issues, and education realities to name a few. Students will see and experience these realities in South Africa. It is one thing to read about these differences, but the feeling when you are there makes these racial realities painfully clear. The feeling of being in a supermarket and all of the whites cutting in front of you or watching the way that different classmates are treated based on their race are examples of the more subtle ways race plays out in this country. These subtle actions were not captured in the pictures that flooded the television after Mandela's death, but are the reality of life in South Africa. Students will see most of the important landmarks, Hector Pieterson Memorial, apartheid museum, house of Nelson and Winnie Mandela, a shanty town in Soweto, Constitutional Hall, and Robben Island among others.

For more information on program costs and how to apply for the program, paste this URL into your web browser:

https://depauw-horizons.symplicity.com/index.php?s=programs

Enter "Winter" into the Term search box.


Alicia Suarez

183IG: Winter Term in Service Ecuador with Timmy Global Health (off-campus)

Students will travel to Tena, Ecuador to work alongside medical professionals and members of the U.S. non-profit, Timmy Global Health. Students will set-up and work in medical clinics located in rural communities in the Amazon basin. This portion of the winter term will last 10-12 days. Upon returning to DePauw, the class will meet daily to discuss issues related to global health, the work of non-profit organizations and the ramifications of international medical service.

For more information on program costs and how to apply for the program, paste this URL into your web browser:

https://depauw-horizons.symplicity.com/index.php?s=programs

Enter "Winter" into the Term search box.


Maria Luque

183IH: Madrid to Malaga: Spanish Immersion (off-campus)

Learn or reinforce beginning Spanish language on location in the southern province of Andalusia. After several days in Madrid, visiting major attractions, students will take 50 hours of intensive Spanish in Malaga at the center for Curso de Espanol para Extranjeros (Spanish Course for Foreign Students) affiliated with the University of Malaga. Native instructors with degrees in Spanish linguistics and foreign language pedagogy will teach small sections (10 students per class), five hours daily. After the midday break there will be opportunities to visit cultural sites in Malaga and practice speaking Spanish with native speakers. Weekends excursions will take the group to Cordoba, Granada, Gibraltar, Marbella and Sevilla. While in Malaga, students will live with host families. We expect students to have greater incentive and motivation to learn the language and experience the "feel" of immersion. Malaga, an important port city on the Mediterranean coast, enjoys a mild climate year round, with June temperatures in the 80s.

For more information on program costs and how to apply for the program, paste this URL into your web browser:

https://depauw-horizons.symplicity.com/index.php?s=programs

Enter "Winter" into the Term search box.


Pedar Foss

183II: The Architecture of Sport: Soccer in Italy (off-campus)

Ancient sport peaked during the Roman Empire. Arenas for chariot racing and mortal combat sat alongside baths and gymnasia, where exercise, training and ball-play became the ancestors of modern soccer, rugby and football. Romans monumentalized sporting architecture, building venues for hundreds of thousands of people -- sport as mass spectacle, social diversion, and political manipulation. This course examines the ancient history of sport and its venues in Italy, from the Roman period through the Medieval and Renaissance, by visiting Rome, Perugia, and Firenze (Florence). Students will participate in soccer training led by Italian coaches, play matches against local teams in each city, and attend professional matches. We will also examine statues, paintings, and mosaics of ancient athletes, and study the archaeological evidence for their performance, play, and presentation. In particular, we will consider the Roman sport of harpastum, and will trace its survival through the Medieval period to its Renaissance re-emergence as calcio storico, which connected with the English game in late 19th-c. Italian ports to become calcio ('soccer', but literally 'kick'), the national sport of modern Italy, four-time World Cup winners.

For more information on program costs and how to apply for the program, paste this URL into your web browser:

https://depauw-horizons.symplicity.com/index.php?s=programs

Enter "Winter" into the Term search box.


May Term information

Steven Timm

183DA: Wilderness Writing: Backpacking Isle Royale (off-campus)

This May Term 2017 course will take an interdisciplinary approach to the study and interpretation of Isle Royale in Lake Superior. A designated wilderness area, Isle Royale is located in the northwest section of Lake Superior and comprises nearly 900 square miles of forests and inland lakes. Students will spend four days on campus and fifteen days on the island backpacking from Rock Harbor to Windigo on the Greenstone Ridge, with a return hike on the more ambitious and less forgiving Minong Ridge. The premise for this course is that by being fully immersed in a location--physically, emotionally, and intellectually, one develops a more informed understanding of place and an enhanced ability to derive and interpret experience. After directly experiencing the ecological balances and complexities of natural processes and human interventions, students will produce a collective text for public performance.

For more information on program costs and how to apply for the program, paste this URL into your web browser:

https://depauw-horizons.symplicity.com/index.php?s=programs

Enter "May" into the Term search box.


Bill Fenlon

183IB: Peace Players--Belfast (off-campus)

Peace Players/Belfast is a co-curricular service course designed to bring students to the center of the ongoing conflict between Northern Ireland and the United Kingdom regarding the centuries-old battle for religious and political independence, and to offer them the opportunity to participate in reconciliation efforts aimed at children that combine sports and mentoring under the auspices of Peace Players International /Northern Ireland.

Students spend the service portion of the trip working in support of the Peace Players daily mission and in assisting with the implementation of its annual 'Spring Jam'-a citywide basketball tournament which brings together catholic and protestant youth on mixed teams. This experience is augmented in advance with assigned readings and films, and in Northern Ireland through visits to historically significant sites (Derry and Corrymeela), meetings with reconciliation specialists, and regional writers and historians. The final three days of the course will be spent in Dublin, Ireland, where students will further explore Irish history and be encouraged to reflect on the differences between the two countries.

The course is designed to be immersive--examining conflict, culture, history and social change through daily interaction with the religiously diverse Peace Players staff and the children they serve--and participatory, allowing students the opportunity to coach and mentor youth via the interactions and challenges of healthy competition and to reflect with both fellow team members and similarly-aged Peace Players coaches.

For more information on program costs and how to apply for the program, paste this URL into your web browser:

https://depauw-horizons.symplicity.com/index.php?s=programs

Enter "May" into the Term search box.


Winter Term information

Jennifer Schepers

183DA: DePauw Kelley Program (off-campus)

Meeting Times: 1 week at IU campus* *Please note that due to the special nature of the class- we start one day before the official start of the class.

The DePauw Management Accelerator Program (D-MAP) blends liberal arts critical thinking and analytical skills with a business foundation that allows students to effectively influence and direct issues that matter to them. Working with Indiana University Kelley School of Business faculty, students learn to apply business basics and liberal arts broad-based thinking to contemporary problems, developing skills that will guide them to success as a leader both personally and professionally. DePauw - Kelley cohorts work with an Indiana company to research and evaluate areas of potential growth. Recommendations are made in small groups to the company in a final presentation the last week of class. The intensive three weeks requires individual excellence and a strong sense of team responsibility. In addition to the case work, students also receive focused career coaching and guidance to help them present their skills in the most competitive manner for internships and full-time positions. Employer partners from a variety of industries serve as guest lecturers for this portion of the course. All students are invited to attend the Kelley School Career Fair in January at the end of the course.

All DMAP students are guaranteed support for a summer internship in the form of the Summer Internship Grant of up to $3000.00 through the Hubbard Center.

For more information about this course, including costs, please visit the Horizons off campus study system at https://depauw-horizons.symplicity.com/ then select 'Winter' from the Term search dropdown. To apply to participate in this course, select the 'Welcome' tab in Horizons and login.


Steven Timm

183DB: Wilderness Writing: Paddling Florida's Everglades (off-campus)

What is the impetus that drives politicians to agree, regardless of political affiliation, that saving Florida's Everglades is a good idea? What is it about The Everglades, with conjured images of alligators and poisonous snake sliding into brackish waters, of mangrove forests too thick for humans to traverse, of mosquitoes and biting insects that drive a person to frenzy, that continues to spark our imaginations and fosters the desire to protect and restore? Florida's Everglades, the largest sub-tropical ecosystem on the continent, has a rich and complicated natural and human history. Home to hundreds of common, rare, and uncommon species, this unique and fragile preserve is designated a World Heritage Site, a Biosphere Reserve, and a Wetland of International Significance. This course will examine various aspects of The Everglades through research, through the physical challenge of paddling the length of the Wilderness Waterway, and through observing, documenting, and sharing personal and creative interpretations garnered along the way. We'll link the aesthetic experience and interpretation of place with the challenge of and extended and complete immersion in this wilderness area.


Aaron Dziubinskyj

183IA: Winter Term in Service: Nicaragua (off-campus)

Companion Community Development Alternatives (CoCoDA) has been involved in grassroots, community development collaborations with communities in El Salvador since 1992 and more recently in Nicaragua. The State of Nueva Segovia is located in the mountainous terrain of northern Nicaragua. While a verdant and beautiful region, many of its inhabitants are coffee harvesters and subsistence farmers living in small, primitive villages of about 200 people. Most of these villages lack schools, clinics, water systems and some are even without electricity. What they do not lack is a desire to improve the living conditions for themselves and their children. A significant portion of the WTIS group's time would be working with Nicaraguans in the community of Zacataloza, in the state of Nueva Segovia. Through this context, the primary objective of this course will be to gain an understanding of the Nicaraguan people, particularly their situation within the context of recent history and the complex relations that Nicaragua has with the United States. Studying this relationship between our two countries will help DePauw students gain a perspective of the role that we, as citizens of the United States, have played or currently playing in the lives of the people of Latin America. Now more than ever such an informed perspective is necessary as the United States' current politics toward (im)migration, especially that of Latin America, has opened up many areas of discussion and debate about our country's responsibility in the global arena.


Alexander Komives

183IB: Scientific Revolutions: Historical and Cultural Context (off-campus)

This course will expose students to the historical and cultural roots of some of the most important and revolutionary ideas in science that continue to influence our lives today. Some ideas to be examined contain paradigm shifts in the Kuhnian sense; they changed the underlying assumptions we have in our understanding of the natural world. Other ideas do not necessarily constitute paradigm shifts, but rather are examples of how scientific discoveries profoundly influence how we see ourselves in the world. The course will take place in the U.K. (London and Cambridge), as well as in Italy (Rome and Florence). We will meet to discuss the people and ideas linked with the scientific and cultural sites, as well as visit academic centers and hear from experts about important historical influences. We'll examine the influence of Charles Darwin, Isaac Newton, Galileo, Francis Crick and James Watson. We will visit the Greenwich Observatory, University of Cambridge, and Darwin's home amongst other sites in England. In Italy, we'll visit the Galileo Museum, the Uffizi, the Accademia and the Vatican. There will be history of science readings and writing assignments which will require students to critically evaluate the ideas being presented to them.


Robert Hershberger

183IC: Cuba in the Age of Digital Literacy (off-campus)

This course will be a service-learning course in which we will be offering a digital literacy program to school-age children and to those who serve them. We will be working in collaboration with at least two centers in Havana, Cuba: El Centro Martin Luther King and La casa del Nino y la la nina. This course will also interrogate, via experiential learning and service, the challenges Cuba faces in negotiating the digital universe of the 21st century.


Cheira Belguellaoui

183ID: A Literary Journey Through Vietnam (off-campus)

This course is designed to explore Vietnam through the lens of literary and critical readings with a specific focus on history and culture. In Nation and Narration (1990), Homi Bhabha writes, 'To study the nation through its narrative address does not merely draw attention to its language and rhetoric; it also attempts to alter the conception of the object itself'(3) We will read and visit several sites along the Vietnamese Pacific coastline while considering/discussing the narrative strategies authors use to describe Vietnam and/or tell its story. We will read novels by Viet Thanh Nguyen (The Sympathizer), Duong Thu Huong (Paradise of the Blind), Bill Hayton (Vietnam - Rising Dragon) as well as excerpts from 'Vietnamese Voices 2016: An Anthology of Contemporary Vietnamese Narratives' and 'Vietnam: A Traveler's Literary Companion' Destinations/sites include -but are not limited to- Ho Chi Minh city, My Tho, Can Tho, Mui Ne, Nha Trang, Quy Nhon, Hoi An, Da Nang, Hue, Hanoi, Ninh Binh, and Ha Long.


Claudia Mills

183IE: Enchanted Spaces: Children's Lit Sites in London/Paris (off-campus)

Much great literature is grounded in a sense of place. This is especially true of children's literature, for the settings of beloved children's classics reflect the construction of childhood itself as a place and space apart: a position of innocence, distinct from the world of adulthood, that can be protected or violated. Child characters fly from the nursery to Neverland and back again, fall down rabbit holes into Wonderland, roam the hallways of Hogwarts, explore the streets of Paris on foot or sail above them in a red balloon. These stories are thoroughly situated in distinctive locales, often inspired by the real-life experiences of their authors. This course will take students to literary sites in London, Oxford, and Paris to explore the relationship between classic children's texts and the locales in which they were created and from which they were inspired. We will play Poohsticks in the Hundred Acre Wood, follow the footsteps of Lewis Carroll and Alice Liddell in Oxford, see the sites that shaped the writing and filming of Harry Potter, explore Madeline's Paris, and more.


Khadija Stewart

183IF: The Role of Technology in Enhancing Communities in India and Sri Lanka (off-campus)

The purpose of this course is to study science and technology development projects that serve rural communities. In recent years, there have been several technology projects that were developed to help rural populations and extend access to various resources such as clean water and computers. Examples of such projects is the hole in the wall project that gives computer access to children in rural areas, the use of interactive radios in the classroom, sharing tablets among all students in the class and development of cheap and efficient water filtration systems. Studying and visiting these project sites will provide a unique opportunity for students to see the direct effect of technology on the quality of life of several communities within both countries.


Pat Babington

183IG: Sport and Activity in Australia (off-campus)

Success in sport and participation in physical activity are prominent in Australia. Australian athletes typically contend for Olympic medals in a variety of sports (swimming, track and field, rowing, cycling to name a few). The sports that have a national following in Australia (Australian rules football, rugby, and cricket) are different from those in the United States. For the Olympic sports, Australia uses a different model to identify and develop talent compared to the U.S. From the standpoint of physical activity Australia appears to have many of the same problems (a high percentage of the population that is sedentary, obese or overweight) that plague the U.S. While there are similarities to the U.S. in their efforts to combat these problems they again use a slightly different model. In this course we will compare the Australian model for both sport and physical activity to the what is used in the U.S. by visiting sites in Australia that have a prominent role in sport and physical activity. Students will play softball games against local teams and interact with the players from those locations.


Paul Johnson

183IH: Multiculturalism in Moorish Spain and Morocco (off-campus)

This course is designed to provide students with a cultural, political, and historical introduction to Hispano-Arab and Franco-Arab relations. We will actively endeavor to understand the shared history, cultural and linguistic exchange, colonial interests and diplomatic relations that frame contemporary epistemologies informing our understandings of France, Spain, and Morocco today. Site visits will take place daily and provide concrete illustrations of the critical issues with which we will engage, including politics, sexuality and gender, race and religion, linguistic diversity, urban life, migration, and community development, among others. Importantly, we will consider the stakes of these issues as they relate to the historic and contemporary relations between Islam and Christianity, North Africa, and Western Europe.


Su Jung Kim

183IJ: A Zen Buddhist Monastic Experience in South Korea (off-campus)

Buddhism has been practiced in Korea for over 1,700 years. Korean temples adhere to a meditative form of Buddhism called Seon, better known by its Japanese name, Zen. Dozens of Buddhist monasteries offer a cultural immersion program called "Temple Stay." This program invites visitors to participate in monastic Buddhist life for short periods of time. A key component of this winter term course will be to provide students the unique opportunity of experiencing meditation and monastic life firsthand through participating in the Temple Stay program. Additional cultural and social activities will help students put this experience in broader context, thereby acquainting them with a nuanced understanding of Korean culture, religion, and society. In particular, students will visit two major Buddhist temples (Songwangsa temple and Golgulsa temple, both of which are located in the southern part of the country) as well as historical and cultural sites in three major cities (Seoul, Pusan, and Kyongju) in South Korea.


May Term information

Bill Fenlon

183IA: Peace Players/Belfast (off-campus)

Peace Players/Belfast is a co-curricular service course designed to bring students to the center of the ongoing conflict between Northern Ireland and the United Kingdom regarding the centuries-old battle for religious and political independence, and to offer them the opportunity to participate in reconciliation efforts aimed at children that combine sports and mentoring. This course is offered in collaboration with Peace Players International /Northern Ireland. Students spend the majority of the course in direct service working in support of the Peace Players daily mission and assisting with the implementation of the Peace Player/NI annual 'Spring Jam'-a citywide basketball tournament which brings together catholic and protestant youth on mixed teams. This experience is enhanced with readings and films consumed and discussed in the spring semester prior, and once in Northern Ireland, with visits to historically significant sites (Derry and Corrymeela, in particular), meetings with reconciliation specialists, and discussions with regional writers and historians. The final three days of the course will be spent in Dublin, Ireland, where students will further explore Irish history and be encouraged to reflect on the differences between the two countries. The course strives to deliver an immersive experience in conflict, culture, history and social change through participation. Students will daily interact with the religiously diverse Peace Players staff and the children they serve by engaging in activites including coaching and mentoring youth in the interactions and challenges of healthy competition and reflecting with both fellow team members and similarly-aged Peace Players coaches.


Sherry Mou

183IB: East and West: The Great Wall and the Silk Road in China (off-campus)


Steven Timm

183IC: 'Dreaming' Western Australia: Art and Environment (off-campus)

Our immersion in the landscapes and seascapes of Western Australia includes swimming with whale sharks and manta rays, snorkeling the pristine Ningaloo Reef, abseiling down 100 meter cliffs at Kalbarri, hiking deep into the red gorges of Karijini National Park and across remote sections of the outback, and relaxing on the white shell beaches at Shark Bay. Western Australia's arid outback and beautiful shorelines compose a diverse ecosystem with fossil records dating back nearly 3 billion years, but this landscape is also home to hundreds of indigenous aboriginal clans, all predating European arrival by tens of thousands of years. Hundreds of distinct aboriginal clans, each with their own rich language and culture, populate Australia. Contemporary aboriginal art reveals and encodes a complex inheritance of mythology, religion, metaphysics--knowledge systems organized by environmentally and geographically specific landscapes--where human survival depends on working in concert with the flora and fauna. The visual arts map "songlines" and "dreamtime," migratory and spiritual routes crisscrossing this harsh and beautiful continent, and you'll meet these artists, learn their stories, and experience their lands.


Steven Snyder

183ID: Culture and Arts in Taiwan (off-campus)

This course will focus on the history, culture and arts of Taiwan, including performances in Taiwan.