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UNIV 184

On-Campus Extended Studies Course

An on-campus course offered during the Winter or May term. May be offered for .5 course credits or as a co-curricular (0 credit). Counts toward satisfying the Extended Studies requirement.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Variable

Winter Term information

Angela Flury

184A: Film Reviewing

Course Time: 1:00-4:00 p.m. MTWF
Location:
Fees: None
Prerequisites: None

Do you want to learn how to review films, how to write thoughtfully for an audience awaiting your insights and judgements? In this course, you will learn the essential tools necessary to write in response to current releases as well as older films, both for online and print venues. Along the way, you will learn the necessary discourse to analyze, interpret, and assess films. As a class, we will will watch productions from across the globe, including the U.S., mainstream, independent, and esoteric films and you will practice pitching your reviews to fit the ethos and practices of particular publications. If you love cinema, like to discuss it, and want to learn reviewing techniques, this course is for you (no prerequisites are necessary).


Brian Wright

184B: Medical Terminology

Course Time: 10:00 a.m.-noon, 1:00-2:00 p.m. MTWRF
Location:
Fees: None
Prerequisites: None

This course will focus on important terminology, common prefixes, and root words that provide a foundation for medical and health science language. The course will be organized by our body's systems and provide a basic, yet brief overview of human structure and function. Additional topics will include a general summary of applicable medical specialties, pathology, diagnostic tools, and treatment procedures. Students will focus on mastering the language necessary to describe how each body system works and practice problem sets within each body system. The purpose of this course is twofold. First to provide a thorough preparatory approach to language utilized in fields of anatomy and physiology, as well as, medical sciences. Secondly, to provide DPU students with the option of fulfilling a common prerequisite course in preparation for educational pathways in health sciences.


Douglas Harms

184C: Civic Education: Connecting Classroom and Community

Civic Education: Connecting Classroom and Community for Bonner Scholars will explore the relationship between classroom-based learning at DePauw with out of class experiences in Greencastle and Putnam County. There will be six guiding topics for the course which include social justice, civic engagement, community building, spiritual exploration, international perspective, and diversity. Two weeks of the course will be structured as an on-campus seminar, focusing on historical and current readings as well as discussions with leaders from the local community and campus. One week will be spent on a service-based immersion project at a regional site, such as St. Louis. The combination of the on- and off-campus elements of the course provides a shared group experience with direct service as the basis for critical reflection. Participation in both the on- and off-campus portions of the course is required for credit. This course is only open to Bonner Scholars, who are already deeply involved with the local community through direct service and advocacy work as class readings and discussions will draw largely upon the lived experience of class members.


Naima Shifa

184D: Pre-Calculus Skills and Strategies for Success

Course Time: 12:30-2:00 p.m, 3:15-4:45 p.m. MTWR
Location:
Fees: None
Prerequisites: None

The course aims to better prepare our students for later calculus coursework, reduce math anxiety and excel them in their major interests: Econ, Pre-engineering, Business Administration, Biology and Psychology. In this course, students will be learning and reviewing about functions, the theory of equations, matrices, and determinants, limits, and derivatives for the most part. They will also review algebra, trigonometry and analytical geometry. The emphasis in the course is on refreshing a student's knowledge rather than teaching the basics from scratch. After completing this course, students will be ready to apply the mathematical skills in performing operations and problem-solving such as equations, formulas, graphs, tables, functions, and figures, and draw inferences from them. Also, they will be able to communicate mathematical information conceptually, symbolically, visually, or numerically using appropriate terminology and evaluate and interpret numerical information, relationships, facts, concepts, and theories related to the quantitative world.


Colleen McCracken Renick

184E: Preparing for Medical School

Course Time: 1:30-4:30 p.m. MTWF
Location:
Fees: $1799, fee support is available. Please see Dr. McCracken Renick for more details.
Prerequisites: Must be Junior or Senior

This course is designed to prepare students for the medical school application process, as part of the Hubbard Center's pre-professional opportunity initiatives. The course will cover personal statement development, application procedure, research, interview preparation, and more. The course will involve research, writing, discussion, peer editing, and test preparation/practice. Course guests include doctors in various fields, medical school students, hospital administrators, healthcare litigation attorneys, healthcare insurance professionals, medical school professors or medical school admissions team members. As test preparation/practice, the course will also include a discounted, live, comprehensive Kaplan MCAT Advantage OnSite class led by a rigorously trained instructor. This portion of the course will continue meeting twice a week until March (Monday and Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30, may be subject to change).


Nicole Burts,
Staff

184F: Preparing for Law School and Future Law Careers

This course provides hand-on opportunities to develop skills that will help students apply for, and be successful in, law school. Students will explore whether or not they should attend law school, gain an introduction to the Law School Admission Test, explore career possibilities with a law degree, and learn what to expect during the first year of law school. In addition, students will explore law schools and learn more about the opportunities available as a DePauw law scholar at Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law and Indiana University Maurer School of Law. Additional exploration will include how to think like a law student and prospective careers with a law degree. The course will also include numerous full day trips to Indianapolis to meet with various judges and attorneys in the Indiana legal and professional community. A special 3 day section about corporate law will be taught by guest instructor and DPU board member, Gerald Haberkorn '83. This course will be taught by the Pre-Law Adviser, Nicole Burts, J.D. '13. For more information about the course, contact Nicole Burts in the Hubbard Center.


Timothy Good

184G: DePauw Theatre Production

Course Time: 10:00 a.m-noon, 1:00-3:30 p.m. MTWRF
Location:
Fees: None
Prerequisites: None

Participants in DePauw Theatre Production will collaborate in producing a full-length play during the January Winter Term, to be performed as part of the DePauw Theatre mainstage season. Each student will assume responsibility for one aspect of the production: (performing, stage management, assistant directing, props, costumes, publicity, dramaturgy, sound design). Each student in the WT course will read the script; students will read pertinent Moodle selections about their respective areas of production, appropriate to their track in performance, management, or in design and technology.


Susan Anthony

184H: Audition for Stage and Screen

Course Time: 10:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m., 2:00-4:00 p.m. MTWRF
Location:
Fees: $125
Prerequisites: None

In this course, students will learn theory, concepts and terminology for acting & auditioning and apply them to preparing auditions for stage work, on-camera work, and voice-overs. They also will learn to critique themselves and others in a constructive manner. In the first half of the course, students will learn acting concepts for stage, rehearse and perform two contrasting monologues, and learn techniques for "cold read" auditions. They will perform these pieces for guest adjudicator Robert Neal, working actor and member of Actors Equity, who will critique these auditions. In addition, students will attend a performance at the Phoenix Theatre in Indianapolis. In the second section of the course, students will prepare on-camera commercials and industrials. For this unit, they will learn terminology and etiquette for on-camera auditions, prepare a commercial and industrial, and perform them for a casting agent: Michelle Moore of Artistic Indiana in Indianapolis. At the conclusion of the course, students will have memorized and performed monologues for stage and the camera and received professional critiques.


Neal McKinney

184J: Leadership for a Socially Just Society

Course Time: 1:00-4:00 p.m. MTWF
Location:
Fees: $50
Prerequisites: None

This course will discuss the importance of social justice pedagogy and theory and how it connects to social change leadership for students. This course contains two major components. First, it is designed for student leaders which they examine their own cultural bias and upbringing and how it impacts their current worldview along with developing a philosophy of social justice.Students will engage in facilitated dialogues about the similarities and differences of experience that exist within a group and/or between and across groups. The goal of intergroup dialogue is for students to develop comfort with, and skill in, discourse on difficult topics toward the end of fostering positive, meaningful, and sustained cross-group relationships. We will achieve through using the text, Readings for Diversity and Social Justice which covers topics of race, class, gender, sexual orientation, religion, and ability. This text will help students reflect on their own identities, and how their identities intersect with power, privilege, and diversity. Next, through studying the social change leadership model students will develop the ability to reflect on social justice theory and learn how to apply it to leadership opportunities. Students will examine multiple leadership theories and case studies to connect theory to future practice.


Stevie Baker-Watson,
Staff

184K: Athletics Administration and Sports Management

Course Time: 9:00 a.m.-noon MTWF; Saturday, January 11, 11:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
Location:
Fees: $550
Prerequisites: None

This course will provide a broad overview of the sports industry (amateur and professional athletics), including a scan of career opportunities and skills sets needed to succeed in athletics administration. Students will learn a basic understanding of consumer behavior, segmentation, strategic management, budgeting, facility management, risk management, and ethics in the sport setting (primarily college athletics and professional sports). Students will travel off-campus to visit with industry professionals.


Vin Hoey

184M: Marketing for Businesses and Nonprofits

The ability to develop and implement marketing plans and tools for businesses and nonprofits is a marketable skill. Moreover, marketing is key to understanding the interface between a business and its customers and a nonprofit and its clients, donors, and other stakeholders. Participants will learn brand strategy, marketing and public relations concepts and apply them in a business or nonprofit through hands-on team projects with Putnam County businesses and nonprofits. During the past decade, both businesses and nonprofits have struggled to build awareness of the products and services that they offer to their communities and to resource operations. This struggle has been magnified by difficult economic conditions, funder demands for impact, evolution in marketing best practices and growing diversity in communication media. Students will address these issues by interactively working in small consulting teams to develop a strategic Marketing Plan for a business or nonprofit to help reach customers/clients and other stakeholders and to achieve the organization's goals. These experiential team projects will provide an opportunity to meet real business or nonprofit needs and to contribute to their organizational goals.


Erin Mahoney,
Nicholas Minich

184N: Becoming My Own Career Expert

Course Time: 1:00-3:50 p.m. MTWFR
Location:
Fees: $60
Prerequisites: None

'Who am I, and what do I want to do with my life?' If you find yourself asking this question, know that you are in good company (and that the process of questioning is more important than 'the answer'!). Through this course, you will embark on a mission to better conceptualize your own identity as it relates to life and career goals. You will also have a chance to develop an understanding of the meaning and significance of work, and how to align your identity to the world of work to create a life of intentionality and purpose. This experiential course takes a multi-faceted approach towards the career exploration process. It offers students the opportunity to engage in individual assessment activities, to work in small groups, to interact with alumni, to conduct research and to build connections with individuals in career fields of interest. During this Winter Term experience, students will be challenged and supported in cultivating their curiosity of work and developing skills to satisfy that curiosity.


Doug Smith

184P: Happiness: How to Live with Purpose, Accomplishment and Joy

Course Time: 1:00-4:30 p.m. M; 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. WRF
Location:
Fees: None
Prerequisites: None

Humankind has been searching for happiness throughout human history. The emerging science of Positive Psychology has a lot to say about what leads to happiness. Authentic happiness is about both feeling good and doing good. As such it epitomizes mental health. In this course you will learn 14 skills that lead to peace with the past, confidence in the future and joy and accomplishment in the present -- skills that lead to happiness.


Staff

184Q: Leadership in Business and Beyond: Bringing out the Best in People

Course Time: 9:00 a.m.-noon MTWRF **
**This course will involve a few days of travel to Indiana University and also to the University of Michigan. Travel will be provided as part of the course.
Location:
Fees: $150
Prerequisites: None

This course teaches how for-profit-businesses, nonprofit agencies, creative industries, entrepreneurial start-ups and social entrepreneurship organizations are created and function. Students learn how to evaluate business opportunities, develop new business models, and apply their liberal arts education to establish new management practices to lead teams and organizations. Students learn mindsets, behaviors, and skills to bring out the best in others, especially those who are not like them, to improve individual and operational performance. Several instruments are administered to assess personal strengths, weaknesses, communication styles, and leadership behaviors. During the course, students are exposed to business and leadership experts. DePauw center directors share student success stories and perspectives on leadership development. Alumni and others describe their current roles, challenges, causes, and solutions. Kelley School of Business faculty discuss the functions of business and how those working in them must collaborate to get results and what happens when they don't. Ross Business School faculty explain design thinking and change leadership and facilitate cases and business simulations where participants apply their knowledge. Students will use expert advice as inputs into developing their personal leadership philosophy and development plan to help them on their continuous journey of becoming a better leader in business and beyond.


Eric Edberg

184R: Being a Leader and the Effective Exercise of Leadership

Course Time:
Location:
Fees: None
Prerequisites: Students should have a genuine desire to develop themselves as leaders and have a leadership project in mind. Consultation with the instructor before registering for the course is encouraged.

This course promises to leave students actually being leaders, exercising leadership effectively as their natural self-expression. Developed by academics and personal-development leaders working at several universities and the US Air Force Academy, it is now taught worldwide on undergraduate and graduate levels. It introduces perspectives and develops skills needed to actually bring into being circumstances (a ¿future¿) that fulfill matters of fundamental importance for everyone involved in a particular situation. In other words, it's about discovering/enhancing the ability to make something happen that makes a genuine difference. This lecture, discussion and project-based course is academically rigorous and personally challenging yet affirming. The extensive readings utilize research from the fields of epistemology, phenomenology, ontology, linguistics, and neurology. Students examine their own ways of being and acting through the frameworks of integrity, authenticity, purpose ("being used by something larger than oneself"), and responsibility. Ultimately, it creates an opportunity for students to expand beyond the ways of being and acting they bring into the course, especially those that have held them back, and operate with new levels of self-acceptance, creative imagination and personal effectiveness.


Craig Hadley

184S: Object Narratives in the Museum

Course Time: 9:00 a.m.-noon MTRF
Location:
Fees: $100
Prerequisites: None

This course is intended to provide students with an overview of object based pedagogy through their own research into one of the objects in the University Art Collection. The course will culminate in the sharing of one another's individual object research in a mini exhibition and a written/oral presentation. A series of short lectures, discussions, hands-on collections exercises, field trips to Indianapolis, Bloomington, and other area museums, and individualized object research will introduce students to the complex nature of object care and interpretation in the 21st century museum.


Michael Boyles

184T: An Applied Introduction to Explanatory Visualization

Course Time: 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. MTRF
Location:
Fees: None
Prerequisites: None

An Applied Introduction to Explanatory Visualization is a practical, hands-on course aimed at preparing students to interpret and create visualizations that are appropriate to a wide array of disciplines. Students will gain experience thinking critically about data sets, charts, infographics, and dashboards. They will learn how to use Excel and Tableau to create the most commonly used types of charts and maps. Students will then strategically combine multiple visual elements to create static infographics as well as interactive dashboards and story maps. The work in this course will be set against the backdrop of real-world data sets and problems, and the Excel and Tableau skills learned will be immediately applicable to future DePauw courses or professional endeavors. Only basic computer skills are assumed; no knowledge of programming or statistics is required; no formal course prerequisites; students from all majors and all class levels are encouraged to enroll. This is an on-campus course, but we may take a day trip to Indianapolis or other nearby location.


Christopher Newton

184U: Radio Management and Programming

Course Time: Station will be on 24-7, students will have up to 3 hours in classroom situations between the main class and department meetings daily, and 2-4 hours each daily during the week doing assigned work. Students will also be working, reporting on news and sports and special events on the weekends.
Location: WGRE, Pulliam Center
Fees: None
Prerequisites: None

Students will participate in the daily operation of DePauw's radio station, WGRE. They will learn how a broadcast station is organized and how to operate facilities in a variety of programs. Students' on-air work will be critiqued regularly. Participants will work in two of these four departments: Sports (play-by-play , reporting and sportscasting of DePauw and area sports events); News (writing and announcing news of campus and area interest); Production (preparing and editing promotion and public affairs messages, producing remote broadcasts); and Promotion (making WGRE visible both on and off campus through events, publicity materials, contests and other methods.) Students will have their own DJ shifts throughout Winter Term. Some weekend and overnight work is required.


R. Martoglio,
Daniel Gurnon

184V: Science, Design and Construction of the Electric Guitar

Course Time: 9:30 a.m-4:30 p.m. MTWRF
Location:
Fees: $325
Prerequisites: None

The electric guitar continues to be a key element of rock and jazz music. Guitar designs range from simpler single pickup models to more complex double-neck varieties that use several pickups and a variety of electronics. In this extended studies course, students will have the opportunity to construct an electric guitar beginning with wood that must be finished to form the body, an unfinished neck, loose hardware and electronics. In building an electric guitar from the ground up students will learn and apply Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) principles. Students will also gain experience in woodworking, machining and soldering.


Avery Archer

184W: The Physics of Sport

Course Time: 10:00 a.m.-noon, 1:00-3:00 p.m. MTWRF
Location:
Fees: None
Prerequisites: None

Athletes in all sports learn specific techniques to achieve a desired result. A baseball pitcher learns how to hold a baseball to throw a proper curveball. A high-jumper learns the Fosbury flop technique to maximize jump height. Underlying these techniques and many others in sports are the physical principles that govern our universe. This course will dive into the basic physics at work in a wide range of sports. Students will have the opportunity to do some hands-on exploration of myths and misconceptions of the science behind various sports phenomena and develop their own experiments to examine the role of physics in a sport of their choosing. This course welcomes students of all majors and interests, science and non-science alike.


Ronald Dye

184X: Songwriting Bootcamp

Course Time: 11:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m. MTRF; 2-3 evening concerts
Location:
Fees: $10
Prerequisites: None

Students will gain a more informed knowledge of songwriting by studying its form and meaning, its various types and genres, its methods of composition, its relationship to technology and its position in the marketplace. Students will also have the opportunity to improve listening, critical and analytical, and writing skills through listening to songs and discussing and writing about songs and song craft and the place of popular song in our culture.


May Term information

Naima Shifa

184A: Pre-Calculus Skills and Strategies for Success

The course aims to better prepare our students for later calculus coursework, reduce math anxiety and excel them in their major interests: Econ, Pre-engineering, Business Administration, Biology and Psychology. In this course, students will be learning and reviewing about functions, the theory of equations, matrices, and determinants, limits, and derivatives for the most part. They will also review algebra, trigonometry and analytical geometry. The emphasis in the course is on refreshing a student¿s knowledge rather than teaching the basics from scratch. After completing this course, students will be ready to apply the mathematical skills in performing operations and problem-solving such as equations, formulas, graphs, tables, functions, and figures, and draw inferences from them. Also, they will be able to communicate mathematical information conceptually, symbolically, visually, or numerically using appropriate terminology and evaluate and interpret numerical information, relationships, facts, concepts, and theories related to the quantitative world.


Colleen McCracken Renick,
Staff

184B: Emergency Medical Technician Training

This course provides students with EMT (Emergency Medical Technician) training to prepare them for the Indiana State EMT Certification exam. Satisfactory completion of all in-class and State exams provides full certification for work as EMTs in Putnam County and other areas in the U.S. that meet the cross-certification requirements. During the 3 week course, students learn the basic medical skills used by all EMTs and paramedics for delivering emergency health-care to victims of accident or sudden illness. The range of training encompasses applied human anatomy and physiology to advanced treatments with sophisticated and specialized equipment in the ambulance vehicles. This course is intensive and meets Monday-Saturday for 8 hours per day to meet the State requirements for total hours of in-class training. The course ends with a mandatory Skills practical that qualifies students to sit for the National Registry Cognitive Exam.


Suman Balasubramanian

184C: Applied Projects in Calculus and Linear Algebra

Have you ever wondered about the power of Mathematica in modeling and solving problems in Mathematics? In this course, you will learn how to solve some problems in mathematics that arise in areas like Calculus and Linear Algebra using Mathematica. You will also learn how to use the animation tools and two dimensional and three dimensional data and functional visualization. Topics covered will be a mix of areas that stimulate mathematical learning, while others go straight to the mathematics.