Button Menu
UNIV 184

On-Campus Extended Studies Course

An on-campus course offered during the Winter or May term. May be offered for .5 course credits or as a co-curricular (0 credit). Counts toward satisfying the Extended Studies requirement.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Variable

Winter Term information

Karin Wimbley

184A: New York Auteurs: Martin Scorsese & Spike Lee

Course Time: TBA
Location:
Fees: None
Prerequisites: None

Martin Scorsese and Spike Lee are both life-long New Yorkers, born and raised. Moreover, New York City often plays a title role in each director's aesthetic praxis and cinematic vision. Through the lens of auteur theory, this course examines the cinema of Martin Scorsese and Spike Lee. What is distinct about each director's style of filmmaking? How do race, gender, and ethnicity inform their creative vision(s) on the silver screen? What are the similarities and differences between their respective renderings of national belonging? Films we will explore include Taxi Driver, Raging Bull, Age of Innocence, She's Gotta Have It, and Do the Right Thing, to name a few.


Paige Andersson

184C: Living to Work or Working to Live? Crises of Care

Course Time: TBA
Location:
Fees: None
Prerequisites: None

Why do we work? What kinds of human activities should count as work? What is "essential work?" Could our relationship to work (as workers and to those who work for us) be different? To answer these questions, this class takes "reproductive labor," often called "care work," in the Americas, as a point of departure. As a basic definition, reproductive labor is the work necessary to keep workers alive, productive and to prepare future generations to replace them. It includes a myriad of activities related to childcare, "earthcare," education, eldercare, and healthcare among other things. It is linked to questions of environment, and its organization often relies on institutions and systems including the state, family, gender roles, race, class, and more. This class explores different ways that communities in 20th and 21st century Americas have attempted to reorganize reproductive labor during and following political upheaval, revolutions, and crisis. We will consider hemispheric agrarian and indigenous perspectives, demands from feminist movements in Cuba and Central America, the lived experiences of domestic workers in Brazil, and explore contemporary debates around care work in U.S. society. The class will be interdisciplinary, examining essays and approaches from the social sciences and the humanities, as well representations of care work, broadly defined, in art and film from the Americas.


Sahar Sattarzadeh

184D: Data Justice Storytelling Lab

Course Time: TBA
Location:
Fees: None
Prerequisites: Students should have experience and/or a genuine interest in justice and equity in all and any of their forms (e.g., racial, ethnic, gender, LGBTQ+, dis/ability, environmental, immigration/migration/refugee, global, etc.). No previous data viz or digital art experience/skills are required to enroll in this course.

How can data visualization or "data viz"--graphic or visual representations of education, information, and knowledge--and storytelling help us reimagine data/narratives that center the damage, deficiency, dehumanization, and/or invisibility of peoples and communities? The ongoing global COVID-19 pandemic has amplified preexisting worldly injustices of anti-Blackness, anti-Indigeneity, anti-Asian violence, extremes of poverty and wealth, vaccine apartheid, ableism, war, environmental injustice, xenophobia, racism, Eurocentrism, white supremacy, and heterocispatriarchy, for example. Concurrently, many data viz stories have been critiqued for their amplification of miseducation, dis-/mis-information, and/or inaccessibility due to illiteracy regarding data and representation of facts, including their depictions of underrepresented communities and how they are responding to inequities and inequalities. Excavating the activist and artist in you, this course will serve as an engaging, interactive, inter-/trans-disciplinary laboratory for you to reimagine oppressive narratives through the application of digital visual art and data stories. You will create a data "(re)visualization" portfolio comprised of: a critical data viz essay, journal entries, a video tutorial, data (re)visualizations, and a collaborative e-zine. This course invites you to share and design stories via data viz that reimagine and restore the power, joy, beauty, justice, nobility, humanity, presence and visibility, and constructive resilience of peoples and communities.


Vin Hoey

184E: Marketing for Businesses and Nonprofits

Course Time: TBA
Location:
Fees:
Prerequisites: None

The ability to develop and implement marketing plans and tools for businesses and nonprofits is a marketable skill. Moreover, marketing is key to understanding the interface between a business and its customers and a nonprofit and its clients, donors, and other stakeholders. Participants will learn brand strategy, marketing, PR, and digital marketing concepts and apply them in a business or nonprofit through hands-on team projects with local Putnam County businesses and nonprofits. During the past decade, both businesses and nonprofits have been challenged to build awareness of the products and services they offer and to resource operations. This struggle has been magnified by COVID-19 impacts, funder demands for results, evolution in marketing best practices, and growing diversity in digital communication media. Students will address these issues by interactively working in small consulting teams to develop a strategic Marketing Plan for a business or nonprofit to help reach customers/clients and to achieve the organization's goals. These experiential team projects will provide an opportunity to meet real business or nonprofit needs and to contribute to their organizational goals. A Digital Marketing class session with Matchfire agency leaders via Zoom will share the marketing frontier of orchestrating an organization's website, mass emails, and social media channels.


Stevie Baker-Watson

184F: Intro to Athletics Administration and Sports Management

Course Time: TBA
Location:
Fees: approximately $750
Prerequisites: None

This course will provide a broad overview of the sports industry (college and professional athletics), including a scan of career opportunities and skills sets needed to succeed in athletics administration and sports management. In addition, this course analyzes elements and details relating to organization and execution of athletics events. Students will practice and apply principles to a number of topics including budgeting, site selection, marketing, staffing, risk management, design and evaluation. Students will also learn a basic understanding of consumer behavior, segmentation, strategic management, budgeting, facility management, risk management, and ethics in the sport setting (primarily college athletics and professional sports). Students will travel off-campus to either Indianapolis or St. Louis and visit with industry professionals.


Stevie Baker-Watson

184G: Equity and Inclusion in Sport

Course Time: TBA
Location:
Fees: Approximately $750
Prerequisites: None

This course will define diversity, equity, and inclusion within sport, including how power and privilege manifest in reality. Students will examine how social class and economic status, gender and gender identity, race and ethnicity, disability, political influence and affiliation, religion, and age affect equity and inclusion in sport. Students will learn about how to have difficult conversations, plan strategically, assess organizational climate, and use sport as a platform for social change.


Julia Proctor,
Heather Wright

184K: Peer Education in the Field of Health Promotion

Course Time: TBA
Location:
Fees: Approximately $950
Prerequisites: None

Peer education is a powerful tool for expanding the knowledge of a group of individuals on a specific topic. In the college environment, peer education programs can take on various form such as peer tutoring or peer instruction. This course will focus on developing students¿ abilities as peer educators whose emphasis is on health promotion and prevention. Students will complete a formalized training through the NASPA Certified Peer Educator program to equip them with skills to create change in high risk behaviors, listen effectively, manage group development and success and hone programming and presentation abilities. Students will subsequently learn about the content areas of substance abuse prevention, sexual assault and interpersonal violence prevention, and mental health and wellness in order to develop a competence sufficient to lead a workshop on a topic of their choosing for a group of college students. As a part of the course, students will travel to participate in the 2023 NASPA Strategies conference in Kansas City, MO, which serves to provide student affairs practitioners with the knowledge and skills to effectively address collegiate alcohol and drug abuse prevention, mental health, sexual violence prevention and response, and well-being through a variety of comprehensive and integrative approaches. This course serves as a strongly suggested preparation for application to the Peer Education program.


Guangjun Qu

184M: Where Underpants Come From

Course Time: TBA
Location:
Fees: None
Prerequisites: None

Have you even thought about where and how are your underpants made? Do you believe that the exploration of underwear industry can help you better understand rising manufacturing power of China, the bilateral relation between the U.S. and China, and the effects of globalization upon people's life? In this exploration project, we will embark on an odyssey to the other end of the Pacific and seek the answers to the above questions without really spending thousands of dollars. Through reading several award-winning, bestselling books, including River Town, Oracle Bones, and Country Driving, we will discuss in depth international business, global integration of economic activities, and the human side of economic development. Students should be able to build a broader view of our global economy and deeper understanding of economic forces shaping our world.


Colleen McCracken Renick

184N: Preparing for Medical School

Course Time: TBA
Location:
Fees: $1450
Prerequisites: Students should have taken Bio 101 & 102, Chemistry 120, 130, 170, 240, 260 Physics 120.

This class includes Kaplan MCAT Prep + Medical School Application Preparation. It is designed to prepare students for the medical school application process. The course will cover personal statement development, application procedure, research, interview preparation, and more. The course will involve research, writing, discussion, peer editing, and test preparation/practice. Course guests include doctors in various fields, medical school students, hospital administrators, medical school professors or medical school admissions team members. As test preparation/practice, the course will also include a comprehensive Kaplan MCAT class led by a Kaplan instructor. This portion of the course will meet as the Kaplan schedule dictates.


Sutthirut Charoenphon

184P: Beat the Challenge of Trigonometry

Course Time: TBA
Location:
Fees: None
Prerequisites: High school algebra background.

Trigonometry is identified as a "challenging" topic for high school and college students. Even after studying trigonometry at the high school level, many students still struggle with adapting or applying it to novel problems. This course will reinforce the principles of trigonometry, preparing students for college-level calculus.


Rebecca Alexander

184Q: Exploring Greencastle Through Participatory Mapping

Course Time: TBA
Location:
Fees: None
Prerequisites: None

This course will be focused on exploring the city of Greencastle while developing skills for engaging with, representing, and imagining space. The course will explore processes of city governance, organizing for change, education, housing, business development, and community development work. We will meet with city organizers, residents, officials, and youth and learn about the history and present of the city. We will also explore the different spaces of the city--parks, schools, streets, paths, stores, etc. Our readings will focus on understanding the history and context of the city through looking both at local archives and at the broader policies and practices that shape what is happening here. We will also read about space and place and about different ways of understanding, mapping, and thinking about cities.


May Term information

Koray Sayili

184A: Personal Finance

Course Time: TBA
Location:
Fees: None
Prerequisites: None

This course offers the knowledge and tools that will help students make financial decisions (e.g., getting a mortgage, opening and investing in a 401k account, managing their personal portfolio, buying the right type and amount of insurance) in their daily lives.