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UNIV 184

On-Campus Extended Studies Course

An on-campus course offered during the Winter or May term. May be offered for .5 course credits or as a co-curricular (0 credit). Counts toward satisfying the Extended Studies requirement.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Variable

Winter Term information

Ophelia Goma

184A: Creative Thinking and Innovation

Course Time: TBA
Location:
Fees: $30
Prerequisites: None

Creative thinking is an essential skill in life. Our ability to be adaptable, show flexibility in our thinking and develop innovative solutions impacts how we lead our personal and professional lives. This course explores the creative process. The goal of this course is to develop creative thinking skills which can be applied broadly to multiple purposes. In this course, you will learn about the benefits of creativity, examine the barriers to the creative process and develop techniques to enhance your own creativity. This is a very hands-on course and active student participation in group and individual projects is expected. Students will engage in a number of creativity experiments and will be asked to practice creativity techniques and reflect (through writing and discussion) on the readings and their experiences. Students from any discipline are welcome to enroll.


Logan Dandridge

184B: Explorations in Modern Cinema


Lydia Marshall

184C: Oral History

Course Time: TBA
Location:
Fees: None
Prerequisites: None

Students in this course will participate in the hands-on collection, interpretation, and public presentation of oral histories. The purpose of the course is to teach students the skills and knowledge necessary to conduct oral historical research. We will spend some time discussing the development of oral history as a field, the ethics of interviewing, and the special role of oral history in building our understanding of the past. The primarily goal of this course, however, is to help students become competent in oral historical methods. Towards that end, much of our focus in the class will be on strategies for conducting effective interviews. We will also learn how to record, transcribe, index, interpret, and publicly present oral histories. Above all, students in this course should expect to spend much of their time doing oral history rather than just talking about it in a classroom.


Brittany Sizemore

184D: The Psychology of Olfaction

Course Time: TBA
Location:
Fees: $50
Prerequisites: None

This course is intended to provide students with an overview of olfaction (smell) through a psychological lens. Students will learn about the sensation and perception of smell through various readings of research articles and popular press books. Students will collect and discuss weekly smell journals. Students will watch movies that explore smell for humans and animals. Students will participate in a "dine-in-darkness" activity that will highlight the importance of smell in relation to food and other sensory systems. Students will have the opportunity to attend optional field trips to local places of interest regarding olfaction (e.g., Indianapolis Zoo, candle businesses, art museums, restaurants, nature preserves) in Indianapolis, Bloomington, Terre Haute, and the surrounding areas. Students will be responsible for creating and showcasing a final product that demonstrates the cultural, personal, or academic significance of smell.


Caitlin Howlett

184E: Teaching and Learning Beyond the Classroom

Course Time: TBA
Location:
Fees: $150
Prerequisites: EDUC 170

This course provides students with the opportunity to cultivate a better understanding (theoretically, historically, and practically) of some of the many ways in which education, teaching, learning are happening in the United States today. Designed specifically for Education Studies majors, minors, or students interested in inhabiting some kind of 'teaching' or 'pedagogical' space in the future, this course will allow students to directly interact with and learn about education from undergraduate students in teacher certification programs, professors in teacher certification programs, policy makers, community educators, legislators, politicians, public and private school teachers, union leaders, prison educators, adult educators, and education-related non-profits, to name a few.


Brian Howard

184F: Campanology

Course Time: TBA
Location:
Fees: $30
Prerequisites: None

Students will learn about the history and practice of bell ringing. Bells have been used for music and communication since ancient times. Part of the course will involve reading and discussing bell-related literature (for example, Poe's 'The Bells' and Sayers' 'The Nine Tailors'). Another aspect of the course will look at the physics of bells and their unique harmonics, as well as mathematical patterns in the ringing of bells. A major component of the course will be learning to ring music on English handbells, with the goal of giving a small concert at the end of the term. The class will also experience carillon music and change-ringing through trips to nearby bell towers. Students will give a presentation on an aspect of the history of bells, and will also be evaluated on their contribution to class discussions, rehearsals, and the final performance. No prior musical skills will be required.


Daniel Gurnon,
R. Martoglio

184G: Science, Design and Construction of the Electric Guitar

Course Time: TBA
Location:
Fees: $325
Prerequisites: None

The electric guitar continues to be a key element of several musical genres. Guitar designs range from simpler single pickup models to more complex double-neck varieties that use several pickups and a variety of electronics. In this extended studies course, students will have the opportunity to construct an electric guitar beginning with wood that must be finished to form the body, an unfinished neck, loose hardware and electronics. In building an electric guitar from the ground up students will learn and apply Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) principles. Students will gain experience woodworking, machining, painting/staining and soldering, as well as using the tools and equipment necessary to construct a fully functioning guitar.


Avery Archer

184H: The Physics of Sports

Course Time: TBA
Location:
Fees: None
Prerequisites: None

Athletes in all sports learn specific techniques to achieve a desired result. A baseball pitcher learns how to hold a baseball to throw a proper curveball. A high-jumper learns the Fosbury flop technique to maximize jump height. Underlying these techniques and many others in sports are the physical principles that govern our universe. This course will dive into the basic physics at work in a wide range of sports. Students will have the opportunity to do some hands-on exploration of myths and misconceptions of the science behind various sports phenomena and develop their own experiments to examine the role of physics in a sport of their choosing. This course welcomes students of all majors and interests, science and non-science alike.


Julia Sutherlin

184J: Peer Education in the Field of Health Promotion

Course Time: TBA
Location:
Fees:
Prerequisites: None

Peer education is a powerful tool for expanding the knowledge of a group of individuals on a specific topic. In the college environment, peer education programs can take on various form such as peer tutoring or peer instruction. This course will focus on developing students' abilities as peer educators whose emphasis is on health promotion and prevention. Students will complete a formalized training through the NASPA Certified Peer Educator program to equip them with skills to create change in high risk behaviors, listen effectively, manage group development and success and hone programming and presentation abilities. Students will subsequently learn about the content areas of substance abuse prevention, sexual assault and interpersonal violence prevention, and mental health and wellness in order to develop a competence sufficient to lead a workshop on a topic of their choosing for a group of college students. As a part of the course, students will travel to participate in the 2021 NASPA Strategies conference, which serves to provide student affairs practitioners with the knowledge and skills to effectively address collegiate alcohol and drug abuse prevention, mental health, sexual violence prevention and response, and well-being through a variety of comprehensive and integrative approaches. This course serves as a strongly suggested preparation for application to the Peer Education program.


Holbrook Hankinson

184K: Leadership in Business/Bringing Out the Best in People

Course Time: TBA
Location:
Fees:
Prerequisites: None

This course teaches how for-profit-businesses, nonprofit agencies, creative industries, entrepreneurial start-ups and social entrepreneurship organizations are created and function. Students learn how to evaluate business opportunities, develop new business models, and apply their liberal arts education to establish new management practices to lead teams and organizations. Students learn mindsets, tools, and practices to bring out the best in others, especially those who are not like them, to improve individual and operational performance. Several instruments are administered to assess personal strengths, weaknesses, communication styles, and leadership behaviors. During the course, students are exposed to business and leadership experts. DePauw center directors share student success stories and perspectives on leadership development. Alumni and others describe their current roles, challenges, causes, and solutions. Kelley School of Business faculty discuss the functions of business and how those working in them must collaborate to get results and what happens when they don't. Ross Business School faculty explain change leadership and facilitate a business simulation where participants apply their knowledge. Students will use expert advice as inputs into developing their personal leadership philosophy and development plan to help them on their continuous journey of becoming a better leader in business and beyond.


Colleen McCracken Renick

184M: Preparing for Medical School

Course Time: TBA
Location:
Fees: $1799
Prerequisites: BIO 101 & 102; CHEM 120, 130, 170, 240, 260; PHYS 120

This course is designed to prepare students for the medical school application process, as part of the Hubbard Center's pre-professional opportunity initiatives. The course will cover personal statement development, application procedure, research, interview preparation, and more. The course will involve research, writing, discussion, peer editing, and test preparation/practice. Course guests include doctors in various fields, medical school students, hospital administrators, healthcare litigation attorneys, healthcare insurance professionals, medical school professors or medical school admissions team members. As test preparation/practice, the course will also include a live, comprehensive Kaplan MCAT Advantage OnSite class led by a rigorously trained Kaplan instructor. This portion of the course will continue meeting twice a week until March (Monday and Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30, may be subject to change).


Michael Boyles

184N: An Applied Introduction to Explanatory Visualization

Course Time: TBA
Location:
Fees: None
Prerequisites: None

An Applied Introduction to Explanatory Visualization is a practical, hands-on course aimed at preparing students to interpret and create visualizations that are appropriate to a wide array of disciplines. Students will gain experience thinking critically about data sets, charts, infographics, and dashboards. They will learn to use Excel for basic data cleaning and manipulation and then Tableau for creating the most commonly used types of charts. Students will strategically combine multiple charts to create original infographics and interactive dashboards. The work in this course will be set against the backdrop of real-world data sets and examples, and the learned technical skills will be immediately applicable to future DePauw courses, internships or professional endeavors. Only basic computer skills are assumed; no knowledge of programming or statistics is required; no formal course prerequisites; students from all majors and all class levels are encouraged to enroll. This is an on-campus course.


Matthew Balensuela

184P: Creativity: Theories, Scholarship, and Limits

Course Time: TBA
Location:
Fees: $50
Prerequisites: None

The class is a discussion- and research-based approach to questions surrounding the value and limits of creativity and innovation. What is the nature and character of creativity? What traits foster or support creativity? Is a fake painting by Monet less beautiful or meaningful than an original? Following an introduction to the topic of creativity, the course will discuss the forgery of art as it relates to creativity and innovation. The course will conclude with student presentations on topics they have researched during the course.


Colleen McCracken Renick,
Staff

184Q: Emergency Medical Technician Training

Course Time: TBA
Location:
Fees: $750
Prerequisites: Healthcare profession BLS CPR certification before class begins.

This course provides students with EMT (Emergency Medical Technician) training to prepare them for the Indiana and National Registry EMT Certification exam. Satisfactory completion of all in-class and State exams provides full certification for work as EMTs in Putnam County and other areas in the U.S. that meet the cross-certification requirements. During the 3 week course, students learn the basic medical skills used by all EMTs and paramedics for delivering emergency health-care to victims of accident or sudden illness. The range of training encompasses applied human anatomy and physiology to advanced treatments with sophisticated and specialized equipment in the ambulance vehicles. This course is intensive and meets Monday-Saturday for 8 hours per day to meet the State requirements for total hours of in-class training. The course ends with a mandatory Skills practical that qualifies students to sit for the National Registry Cognitive Exam.


Suman Balasubramanian

184R: Colors, Graphs and Networks

Course Time: TBA
Location:
Fees: None
Prerequisites: None

Have you ever wondered about the following questions :
If you are given a map of a country divided into states/regions, what is the fewest number of colors needed to color each region so that no two adjacent regions have the same color? If you are part of a social network group what would be the most efficient way to spread important information throughout the network. In a similar vein, how can you model a vaccination program to prevent the spread of an epidemic. In this course, you will use graph theory to intuitively model and answer such questions. You will also learn to communicate these ideas and concepts to the Greencastle School Community through interactive activities and thus the course will have a service component.


Paul Johnson,
Jessie Scott

184S: Civic Education: Connecting Classroom and Community

Course Time: TBA
Location:
Fees: None
Prerequisites: First-year Bonner Scholar

Designed for first-year Bonner Scholar students, this curricular, half-credit course will challenge you to think critically about community engagement, particularly as it relates to your work through direct service, advocacy, and activism. In principle, the course will be framed by the Bonner Foundation¿s six Common Commitments, including Social Justice, Civic Engagement, Community Building, Spiritual Exploration, International Perspective, and Diversity. In practice, the seminar format of the course will allow us to reflect upon, analyze, problematize, and critique these and other issues related to your work as Bonner Scholars. This will mean interrogating the motives, implications, and impact of this work, as well as its relationship to your own personal set of values and beliefs. An off-campus portion of the course will afford us the opportunity to learn how to engage effectively with other members of a community and work together in advocating for and implementing change and social justice at a local level. Throughout your on- and off-campus experience, you will be invited to connect theory with practice and thus to develop a more robust, critical understanding of your role in community engagement.


Vin Hoey

184T: Marketing for Businesses and Nonprofits

Course Time: TBA
Location:
Fees:
Prerequisites: None

The ability to develop and implement marketing plans and tools for businesses and nonprofits is a marketable skill. Moreover, marketing is key to understanding the interface between a business and its customers and a nonprofit and its clients, donors, and other stakeholders. Participants will learn brand strategy, marketing, PR and digital marketing concepts and apply them in a business or nonprofit through hands-on team projects with Putnam County businesses and nonprofits. During the past decade, both businesses and nonprofits have struggled to build awareness of the products and services that they offer and to resource operations. This struggle has been magnified by funder demands for impact, evolution in marketing best practices and growing diversity in communication media. Students will address these issues by interactively working in small consulting teams to develop a strategic Marketing Plan for a business or nonprofit to help reach customers/clients and to achieve the organization's goals. These experiential team projects will provide an opportunity to meet real business or nonprofit needs and to contribute to their organizational goals. A Digital Marketing class session with Matchfire agency leaders will share the marketing frontier of orchestrating an organization's website, mass emails and social media channels.


Ronald Dye

184U: Songwriting Bootcamp

Course Time: TBA
Location:
Fees: $15
Prerequisites: None

Students will gain a more informed knowledge of songwriting by studying its form and meaning, its various types and genres, its methods of composition, its relationship to technology and its position in the marketplace. Students will also have the opportunity to improve listening, critical and analytical, and writing skills through listening to songs and discussing and writing about songs and song craft and the place of popular song in our culture.
Students with instrumental or vocal musical experience and/or training, or students with a background in creative writing such as poetry are likely to be served well by the course but enrollment is not limited to poets and musicians.


Erin Mahoney,
Nicholas Minich

184V: Becoming My Own 'Career Expert'

Course Time: TBA
Location:
Fees: $60
Prerequisites: None

'Who am I, and what do I want to do with my life?' If you find yourself asking these questions, know that you are in good company (and that the process of questioning is more important than 'the answer'!). Through this course, you will embark on a mission to better conceptualize your own identity as it relates to life and career goals. You will also have a chance to develop an understanding of the meaning and significance of work, and how to align your identity to the world of work to create a life of intentionality and purpose. This experiential course takes a multi-faceted approach towards the career exploration process. It offers students the opportunity to engage in individual assessment activities, to work in small groups, to interact with alumni, to conduct research and to build connections with individuals in career fields of interest. During this Winter Term experience, students will be challenged and supported in cultivating their curiosity of work and developing skills to satisfy that curiosity. Appropriate for all class years.


J. Nichols-Pethick,
Staff

184W: Podcasting: Craft and Culture

Course Time: TBA
Location:
Fees: None
Prerequisites: None

If you don't currently listen to a podcast at some point during the week, chances are you will. And soon. Podcasting has grown exponentially over the past 10 years. There are currently over 500,000 podcasts available for download on any number of aggregator sites (iTunes, Soundcloud, GooglePlay, etc) and the number will continue to grow as more people and industries look to the power of storytelling that can reach increasingly mobile audiences. This course will introduce students to the elements of podcasting from two perspectives: craft and culture. On the craft side, we'll learn how to develop, create, and distribute a podcast from scratch. On the culture side, we'll be considering podcasting as a particularly vibrant media form in its socio-historical context. Students will come away with a finer understanding of podcasting as a cultural form and the ability to participate in the production of their own content.


Lynn Bedard

184X: Microbiology of Food

Course Time: TBA
Location:
Fees: None
Prerequisites: None

Since before recorded history, humans have unintentionally and later intentionally used bacteria, yeast and fungi to preserve, alter and enhance basic food products. From the yogurt you may eat for breakfast to the Swiss cheese and bread on your sandwich at lunch, many foods rely on the process of microbial fermentation. This course will introduce the amazing microbes responsible for the conversion of milk, sugar, fruit juice and other foods into yogurt, leavened bread and wine among a few. Understanding the morphology, genetics, evolution, ecology, and physiology of microbes can help us better understand the human species. In addition to the microbes that make our food, we will investigate the microbes within us that help us digest the foods we eat, educate our immune system and possibly control behavior (at least in mice!). Most class sessions will include lab sessions, during which students will gain hands-on experience with a range of microbes and microbial techniques. Students will also design experiments and report on their results. This course does not count toward majors or minors in the Biology department.


Gregory Schwipps

184Y: Fishing in Literature

Course Time: TBA
Location:
Fees: None
Prerequisites: None

To the uninitiated, reading literature is a way to access a surface-level story. To those who have developed analytical and critical thinking skills, however, reading literary work is a method of studying the world we all live in. In this course you will read several books and approximately sixteen short pieces (short stories, poems and essays). We will also watch several films. There are really no accidents in the act of creating literary art, and with that in mind you will be asked to read each piece closely and evaluate the choices the writer has made. You will have to read in this class, and read thoroughly. You will also be expected to write response papers, analytical papers, and discuss the work in class, and these requirements will help you learn how to express what it is you think the writer is saying about this world. You can also expect to face quizzes on the reading material from time to time. Everything we read will connect, somehow, to fishing. Because, really, what else is there to write about? Nothing else matters.


Clark Sage

184Z: Primitive Skills and Technologies

Course Time: TBA
Location:
Fees: $50
Prerequisites: None

This Winter Term course is a hands-on introduction to primitive skills and technologies used by prehistoric and non-industrialized societies covering such topics as, fire, cordage, weaving, basketry, toolmaking, hide tanning, and more. Each day, students will examine the anthropological context of a particular skill or technology within a specific cultural practice and will then have the opportunity for individual and group experimentation with these skills and technologies. This course is relevant for those interested in anthropology, material culture, Indigenous Peoples, environmental knowledge, and wilderness skills.


May Term information

Kevin Howley

184A: Writer's Boot Camp: An Introduction to College Composition

Course Time: TBA
Location:
Fees: None
Prerequisites: None

This course introduces students to different kinds of academic writing and offers strategies for improving their written expression. The course aims to provide students with the aptitudes and attitudes to succeed across a variety of written assignments common to university curricula. Topics include: writing mechanics and conventions; gathering, engaging with and deploying academic sources; time management for writers; brainstorming, outlining, drafting, revising and peer reviewing.