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ARTH 290

Topics in The History of Art

An in-depth study of a particular topic in the history of art. It may be an examination of a specific artist, group or movement or an exploration of a particular theme or issue in art.

Distribution Area Prerequisites Credits
Arts and Humanities 1 course

Fall Semester information

Hyeri Oh

290A: Tps: Modern Art and Photography in East Asia


Hyeri Oh

290B: Tps: East Asia: Image, Faith, and Power


James Rodriguez

290D: Tps: Physical and Spiritual Heart of Constantinople: Hagia Sophia, Art and Ceremony


Winter Term information

Lori Miles

290A: Tps:History of Social Practice Art


Spring Semester information

Michael MacKenzie

290A: Tps:Art of the Black Diaspora


Fall Semester information

Katherine Mintie

290A: Tps:Racial Identity and Photography in the United States

This course will consider the ways in which photography, since its invention in the mid-nineteenth century, has produced (and continues to produce) meanings about racial identity in the United States. While photography has long been characterized as an objective or neutral medium, this course will explore how photographers, photographic subjects, and audiences have crafted and interpreted photographs to both perpetuate and refute popular beliefs about race and racial difference. This course will begin by examining the use of photography by abolitionists and early anthropologists in the mid-nineteenth century, move on to consider the role of the photographic images during the civil rights movements of the 1960s, and conclude with an examination of work by contemporary artists, such as Ken Gonzales-Day, Carrie Mae Weems, and Wendy Red Star, who incorporate and respond to historic photographs in their work.


Michael MacKenzie

290B: Tps:First World War and Modernist Culture

It is often said that the First World War -- the first industrialized war -- changed everything, brought an end to 19th century culture and politics, and ushered in the Modern era. An entire generation experienced the horrors of the trenches, endless artillery bombardments, and poison gas, only to return home to a world they no longer recognized, and that no longer understood them. The painters, poets, novelists, and movie makers among them did their best to convey their experiences of war and combat through their art forms -- and in the process, contributed to the creation of modernist art and literature. This course will examine the experience of the war through art and literature.


Katherine Mintie

290C: Tps:Representing American Identity: Art and Visual Culture in the US, 1776-Present

This course will examine the visual and material culture of the United States from the American Revolution to the present. Drawing upon an inclusive definition of what constitutes American art, this course will consider not only canonical paintings and sculpture but also popular and vernacular art forms, including quilts, Native American beadwork, and protest posters. This course will also be attentive to the role of cross cultural exchange throughout the history of American art and will examine artworks imported to the United States from makers around the globe as well as work created by American artists living abroad. By considering an expansive set of objects produced by artists and artisans from diverse backgrounds, this course will enable in-depth discussion around the themes of American identity, memory, and belonging. Given the many excellent collections of American art in the local area, this course will provide several opportunities for students to examine and discuss course-related artworks in person.