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We are currently experiencing technical difficulties with the application form. Please submit your application and materials directly to facdev@depauw.edu for review by the Committee. Applications are due December 3, 2021

See Faculty Governance Moodle[1] course for a Discussion Forum where you can post an idea so others can be in touch to team up with you.

Recognizing that not all faculty are at the same stage when it comes to enhancing the diversity and inclusivity of their pedagogy, FDC would like to provide funding for teams of 3-5 faculty members to work on inclusive pedagogy mini-projects during fall 2021, spring 2022, or spanning AY 2021-22. To apply for this funding, please provide the information requested below. FDC looks forward to creative proposals of all types. In the Appendix we have provided a few brief descriptions (not full proposals) of possible mini-projects that would be suitable for this funding.

1. Project Title and Summary (no more than three sentences) to be used in announcing awards

2. Project Description (1000 word limit)

What are your team's main goals? How will you accomplish those goals? What will be your indicators of the success of your project?

3. Project Participant's Individual Goals

Each participant should provide either a bulleted list of 1-3 goals OR no more than 250-word narrative statement. How will this project enhance your professional development regarding diversity and inclusive pedagogy? Do you anticipate other developmental benefits beyond those from a diversity and inclusive pedagogy lens? If so, please briefly describe those benefits.

4. Project Activities and Timeline

Please provide an activities narrative plus a bulleted timeline (no more than 250 words total). Describe activities that your team will do both individually and collectively to achieve the project goals and provide a bulleted. Your description should include how your project will be on-going throughout the semester and be collaborative in nature. For example, you might describe four meetings throughout the semester to discuss readings.

5. Itemized Budget ($2500 project limit) (there can be no stipends for faculty participation)

Provide an itemized budget and budget narrative for project activities. As part of your budget narrative briefly describe how each element of the proposed budget supports your goals. Any particular budget will likely include only a small number of the suggestions below. All receipts for reimbursement must be submitted within four weeks of expenditure.

6. Proposed Project Outcomes and Products

What project outcomes do you anticipate? (Possible examples include, but are certainly not limited to: an annotated bibliography of readings, a new or revised course syllabus, revised writing assignments, a modified reading list for a particular course, and new course activities focused on inclusive pedagogies).

7. Addition to the application guidelines (effective September 2021)

Each faculty member applicant must demonstrate thoughtful effort to deepen their understanding of the complex problems around race and racism in at least one aspect of their professional work: pedagogy and teaching, creative or scholarly work, or service. We welcome intersectional approaches that examine race and racism in relationship to other forms of oppression.

CHOOSE ONE (A, B, C or D) of the options in this document to meet this new requirement: Funding Application Process Additions (effective Fall 2021)

Reports Due After Completion of the Project

Reports for Fall 2021 projects will be due on February 4, 2022. Reports for Spring 2022 or AY 2021-22 projects will be due on September 2, 2022.

Team Project Report

Each individual should provide a short reflection addressing whether or not goals were achieved and describing any envisioned next steps.

Individual Project Reflection (recommended 250 word limit)

Each individual should provide a short reflection addressing whether or not goals were achieved and describing any envisioned next steps.

APPENDIX

Some brief examples to help generate ideas for mini-projects

A project might focus on bringing the intellectual work of current scholars from diverse backgrounds into a single course. A team of three to five faculty members who teach the same course would work together to develop these materials. To represent all students, the team will review the literature, integrate the work of other scholars, incorporate inclusive pedagogy, create exercises, etc. The final products could be a common syllabus, pedagogical approaches to teach the topics, grading rubrics, recommendations for library acquisitions, etc. The proposal budget request might include meals, books, travel, and/or workshop registration. Some projects might seek to leverage existing expertise within the university. This could happen both within departments and across departments. An example of the former might be faculty in Art and Art History building bridges across their different pedagogical approaches to enhance diversity and inclusion in their teaching. They might attend a workshop, talk or conference.

Some projects might seek to leverage existing expertise within the university. This could happen both within departments and across departments. An example of the former might be faculty in Art and Art History building bridges across their different pedagogical approaches to enhance diversity and inclusion in their teaching. They might attend a workshop, talk, or conference together, have regular working lunches, and/or develop a team-taught Winter Term course. An example of the latter might be a group of faculty from Religious Studies and Philosophy teaming up with the aim of incorporating more east Asian thought into their courses. The main work would be identifying and reading primary texts in Eastern religion and philosophy for inclusion in courses and developing revised syllabi for existing courses that include this material. Dipping into scholarship in philosophy devoted to examining connections between eastern and western philosophy would also be part of the process.

A project might focus on mentoring. For example, a team composed of colleagues across various departments develops a faculty mentoring program for their own departments that augments new faculty orientation. The goal here would not only be to inform new colleagues about DePauw's ongoing efforts to build a more equitable campus, but also ask them to share their knowledge of, and experiences with, successful practices at their previous institution(s) and/or graduate school. The team might identify relevant texts, webinars, or local talks/presentations and through working lunches or regular meetings over coffee/tea write up the framework of a new inclusive plan for their individual departments.

A project could build or strengthen collaboration between departments, programs, or schools. For example, voice faculty in the SOM and faculty members in the CLA, perhaps from English, Languages, or History, could explore ways to increase voice students' understanding of the interconnectedness of specific works, putting them in context historically, socially, and/or politically with regard to issues of power, privilege, and diversity. Project activities could include observing each other's courses, virtual or in-person observation of pedagogical approaches at other institutions, and discussion of disciplinary perspectives and context of selected musical pieces.

A team of colleagues from different disciplines could create an online, multimedia, pedagogy resource for the DePauw community. While the focus would be on inclusive pedagogy, the resource, ideally, would be tailored to the group's interests within the larger context of DePauw's educational mission. Funded project tasks could include collaboration to research, discuss, and design the pedagogical resource, interviewing or videotaping colleagues to demonstrate best practices, consulting with librarians and technical support (if not part of the project team), and creating the first iteration of the resource. One example of this is three to five faculty members exploring scholarly writings on diversity and inclusion for use in introductory courses, then creating an FDC libguide to share materials such as learning goals and rubrics for course activities.