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OFF-CAMPUS EXTENDED STUDIES COURSES

Faculty-led domestic and international study and service courses that provide students opportunities to explore and experience other cultures, learn in new environments, develop skills not readily acquired elsewhere, and deepen their understanding of the global community. Curricular offerings earn .5 course credit and count toward satisfying the Extended Studies requirement; co-curricular offerings do not carry academic credit but do count toward the Extended Studies requirement.


Winter Term information

Hiroko Chiba,
David Berque

ASIA 183A: Japanese Culture, Technology and Design (off-campus)

Students will learn about Japanese culture, technology and design with an emphasis on the way these three areas are interrelated. The Japanese concept of monozukuri will serve as the central theme of the course. Monozukuri is one of the key concepts that inspire product manufacturing in contemporary Japanese industry. Mono literally means 'tangible things' while zukuri means 'making.' The compound word implies the spirit or determination to produce excellent products and the ability to constantly improve the products. The spirit of craftsmanship has been the driving force behind traditional art and craft-making throughout the history of Japan. In contemporary society, it is one of the foundations for the production of modern products from cars to robots to video games. As such, the spirit of monozukuri can also be seen in small items commonly found in a regular household. The course will be built around approximately two weeks that are spent on site in Japan. This part of the course will include two primary destinations including three day trips: a) In Kyoto, students will learn about traditional craftsmanship in Japan. We will have a one-day city overview in Kyoto and visits to Nara or Himeji Castle, depending on the weather. A day trip to Nagoya, students will learn about industrial development in Japan through Toyota and will visit the Toyota Commemorative Museum of Industry and Technology as well as the Toyota assembly plant. We will also take a day-trip to Hiroshima and will relate this trip to the need to carefully consider the negative implications of designing new technologies. b) In Tokyo, we will focus on recent technology advancements and innovations. Students will investigate the development of advanced technology through the lens of monozukuri. The Tokyo stay will consist of a one-day city overview, a visit to the National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation (Miraikan), a visit to the Mori Building Digital Art Museum which features the work by teamLab, and a visit to the department of Advanced Robotics at the Chiba Institute of Technology. Additional course time will be spent on campus to develop background and basic language skills prior to departing for Japan and to complete course work upon our return. There are no required prerequisites, however previous exposure to Japanese history, culture or language and/or to technology or design would be be helpful.For more information on program costs and how to apply for the program, paste this URL into your web browser:

https://depauw-horizons.symplicity.com/index.php?s=programs

Enter "Winter" into the Term search box.


Barbara Whitehead,
Ryan Bean

HIST 183A: The French Revolution In Paris (off-campus)

This three-week class will study the course of events that make up the French Revolution. Beginning with the 1787 Assembly of Notables and ending with the crowning of Napoleon Bonaparte as first emperor of France, we will trace the path of this landmark event in world history as it played out in the streets of Paris. After a week of intensive study on campus consisting of lectures, discussions, and student presentations, the class will relocate to Paris where we will spend approximately eleven days walking in the footsteps of the revolutionaries. Sites visited will include: Versailles, Les Halles, Place de la Bastille, the Palace of the Louvre, the Tuileries Gardens, Hôtel de Ville, La Conciergerie, Place de la Concorde, Notre Dame (which we will gaze upon from afar), Cluny Museum, L'Arc de Triomphe, Place Vendôme, Rambouillet, and of course, the Eiffel Tower. There are no prerequisites or language requirements

For more information on program costs and how to apply for the program, paste this URL into your web browser:

https://depauw-horizons.symplicity.com/index.php?s=programs

Enter "Winter" into the Term search box.


Orcenith Smith,
Nicole Brockmann

MUS 183A: DePauw Chamber Symphony WT 2023 Tour: Germany/Austria (off-campus)

The DePauw Chamber Symphony is the elite core of the DePauw University Orchestra and travels on concert tours every other January during DePauw's Winter Term. Students must audition for the ensemble and should contact Orcenith Smith. While some rehearsals will be in fall semester related to University Orchestra rehearsals, WT rehearsals begin on campus on the first day of Winter Term, continue for a week, then the Chamber Symphony leaves campus for ten days. The January 2023 tour is to Germany and Austria with concerts in a number of cities including Salzburg and Vienna.

For more information on program costs and how to apply for the program, paste this URL into your web browser:

https://depauw-horizons.symplicity.com/index.php?s=programs

Enter "Winter" into the Term search box.


Orcenith Smith,
Nicole Brockmann

MUS 183A: DePauw Chamber Symphony WT 2023 Tour: Germany/Austria (off-campus)

The DePauw Chamber Symphony is the elite core of the DePauw University Orchestra and travels on concert tours every other January during DePauw's Winter Term. Students must audition for the ensemble and should contact Orcenith Smith. While some rehearsals will be in fall semester related to University Orchestra rehearsals, WT rehearsals begin on campus on the first day of Winter Term, continue for a week, then the Chamber Symphony leaves campus for ten days. The January 2023 tour is to Germany and Austria with concerts in a number of cities including Salzburg and Vienna.

For more information on program costs and how to apply for the program, paste this URL into your web browser:

https://depauw-horizons.symplicity.com/index.php?s=programs

Enter "Winter" into the Term search box.


Angela Castaneda,
Mandy Brookins

S&A 183AA: Public Health, Community and Culture in Cuba (off-campus)

In this course, students will become integrated in the local community and have the opportunity to experience health care delivery and culture in Cuba (topics include)-Training health professionals for the world's underserved communities -visit to the Latin American Medical School (ELAM) to exchange with US medical students and faculty -A community polyclinic and neighborhood family doctor-nurse office to talk with health care providers -A Biotech pharmaceutical company -A Maternal-child health programs -Elderly Day Centers: a continuous learning opportunity -Art and music in Havana communities. In addition, we travel outside of Havana to rural areas to compare the health care in these communities. This is just a glimpse of what you will be able to see in Cuba. Students will have the opportunity to live with host families, meet people from all walks of life, and see how health interfaces with the environment, education, and culture in Cuba. A minimum basic level of Spanish language is highly recommended.

For more information on program costs and how to apply for the program, paste this URL into your web browser:

https://depauw-horizons.symplicity.com/index.php?s=programs

Enter "Winter" into the Term search box.


Michael Boyles,
Kayla Flegal

UNIV 183DA: Proposing the Future of Tech for Tenzer at DePauw (off-campus)

Join a small team of DePauw students who are being asked to prepare a proposal in response to a prompt which seeks to provide up to $50,000 to equip the Tenzer Technology Center (in the renovated Roy O. West Library). Students will: assess the Roy renovation and gain an understanding of using and equipping library spaces and technology labs; research suitable technology options in-person and online; engage with industry and academic professionals, including members of the DePauw community; learn how to systematically draft a proposal. Students will attend the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas for 5-6 nights the first week of the course and also participate in 1-2 day trips or a local overnight trip to visit nearby technology centers. Course work will include: using media technology to capture their CES experience and then building a website and/or leveraging other digital tools as well as journaling to document; writing a draft proposal, receiving feedback and refining it for final submission. This is a unique opportunity to impact the campus; each team¿s proposal will be reviewed by university leadership and may influence the Center¿s offerings and/or configuration. Per student fees are $1000; funding from the Tenzer Initiative will cover the balance. No formal prerequisites nor technology skills are required; however, students should be prepared to think critically and creatively, to read and research, to write and present, and to demonstrate and develop curiosity and an entrepreneurial spirit. Priority will be given to upperclass students.

For more information on program costs and how to apply for the program, paste this URL into your web browser:

https://depauw-horizons.symplicity.com/index.php?s=programs

Enter "Winter" into the Term search box.


Jennifer Adams,
Alicia Suarez

UNIV 183IB: The Netherlands: Progressive Social Policies in the 21st Century (off-campus)

This course is designed to expose students to the many unique aspects of contemporary Dutch social policies via experiential studies of history, politics, and culture. One of the most significant colonial powers in early modernity, the Netherlands today is characterized by a parliamentary government comprised of multiple political parties and a world leader in progressive social policies. However, it is important to contextualize 21st century Dutch policies in light of the colonial and imperialist history that allowed Dutch art and culture to flourish. In this course, we will introduce you to the pragmatic approach taken by the Dutch to pressing social issues, including health (harm reduction policies), identity equity (gender, race, religion, ethnicity), political organization, and environmental policies. We will do so from a comparative perspective, exploring these contemporary issues in the context of their historical backgrounds that include colonialism and the "Golden Age" as well as the more recent but impactful occupation by the Nazis in WWII. At the end of the course, students will better understand the progressive social policies in the Netherlands and will be able to identify political, economic, social, and cultural connections between The Netherlands and the United States.

For more information on program costs and how to apply for the program, paste this URL into your web browser:

https://depauw-horizons.symplicity.com/index.php?s=programs

Enter "Winter" into the Term search box.


Rebecca Schindler,
Leslie James

UNIV 183ID: Sacred Landscapes of Greece (off-campus)

How does a place become sacred? Are some places more inherently sacred than others? How do religious traditions emerge, grow, mutate or fade away? Can different religions exist in the same spaces? The landscapes of Greece -- from the sea coasts to the mountains to the cities -- provide an opportunity for us to explore those questions through the first-hand study of topography and the environment, archaeological sites, churches, and monasteries. From the Neolithic period (ca. 7000 BCE) through the Bronze Age to the Classical era, the inhabitants of Greece worshipped a range of divinities in caves, on mountain tops, and in the city centers. Sacred places could be as simple as a pile of stones at a cross-road or as complex as an elaborately decorated temple. The Roman conquest of Greece simultaneously brought both the worship of the Emperor and a greater emphasis on mystery cults, ultimately paving the way for Christianity and the Byzantine church. With the rise of the Ottoman Empire in the eastern Mediterranean, parts of Greece became centers of learning and worship for both Muslims and Jews, a legacy that was systematically dismantled and destroyed in the wake of the World Wars. Today, Greece's rich sacred history can be seen in its archaeological and historic places, and felt in its open coastal plains and remote mountain passes. Athens sets the stage for our course, introducing us to the history of Greece through its museums and to urban religion through the remains on the acropolis and its Byzantine churches. From there we travel to Crete, the center of the Minoan culture and Bronze Age religion. Returning to the Mainland, we tour the Peloponnese and Central Greece, exploring the ancient panhellenic sanctuaries of Olympia and Delphi, while also meeting the Apostle Paul on his journey through Greece. From Delphi, we plunge even further into the mountain crevices of central Greece to reach the hanging monasteries at Meteora. From there we head north to Thessaloniki, a center of Christian, Muslim, and Jewish life in Greece up until the early 20th century.

For more information on program costs and how to apply for the program, paste this URL into your web browser:

https://depauw-horizons.symplicity.com/index.php?s=programs

Enter "Winter" into the Term search box.


CJ Gomolka,
Carrie Klaus

UNIV 183IE: Crossing Borders in France and Spain (off-campus)

In its groundbreaking report to the Teagle Foundation (2009), which set a new course for college-level language programs in North America, the MLA proposes that the goal of teaching language and culture should be to develop students who are capable of 'crossing boundaries, traversing borders, and interrogating intersections' with fluidity and awareness. More recently, in his collection of essays An Apartment on Uranus (2019), transfeminist philosopher Paul B. Preciado maintains that experiencing transitions, that is, moving between or tarrying in the interstices of spaces, equips us well to understand the political, sociological, linguistic, and cultural shifts with which we are currently confronted worldwide. Preciado calls this process "experiencing the crossing." Through travel in France and Spain, this winter term course invites students to interrogate the notion of "crossings" in course content and site visits that waver at the borders of language, culture, nationality, class, history, politics, and gender. Experiential activities will ask students to think critically about the tension but also the possibilities that borders produce; the particular ways in which politics and history often play out at borders; the ever-evolving shape of certain borders; and the historical fictions needed to create and maintain the notion of national borders. Destinations will most likely include Paris, Marseilles, Arles, and Perpignan in France, and Girona and Barcelona in Spain. No prior knowledge of French or Spanish needed although some experience could be beneficial.

For more information on program costs and how to apply for the program, paste this URL into your web browser:

https://depauw-horizons.symplicity.com/index.php?s=programs

Enter "Winter" into the Term search box.


Pedar Foss,
Nipun Chopra

UNIV 183IF: The Architecture of Sport: Soccer in Italy (off-campus)

Ancient sport peaked during the Roman Empire. Arenas for chariot racing and mortal combat sat alongside baths and gymnasia, where exercise, training and ball-play became ancestors of modern soccer, rugby and football. Romans monumentalized sporting architecture, building huge venues -- sport as mass spectacle, social diversion, and political manipulation. This course examines the ancient history of sport and its venues in Italy, from the Roman through Medieval and Renaissance periods, by visiting Rome, Perugia, and Florence. We examine statues, paintings, and mosaics of ancient athletes, and study the archaeological evidence for their performance, play, and presentation. We consider the Roman sport of harpastum, and trace its survival through the Medieval period to its Renaissance re-emergence as calcio storico, which melded with the English game in late 19th-c. Italian ports to become calcio ('soccer', but literally 'kick'), the national sport of modern Italy, four-time World Cup winners and twice European champions. DePauw men's soccer team members, as part of a 'foreign tour', will play matches against local teams (the DPU women's team coach has chosen to take their NCAA-sanctioned 'foreign tour' at another time). ALL students can participate in soccer training led by Italian coaches, and attend professional matches.

For more information on program costs and how to apply for the program, paste this URL into your web browser:

https://depauw-horizons.symplicity.com/index.php?s=programs

Enter "Winter" into the Term search box.


Kevin Kinney,
Sarah Mordan-McCombs

UNIV 183IG: Galapagos- Natural Laboratories for Evolution (off-campus)

The Galapagos Islands occupy a unique place in biology that far exceeds their geographic span. These small volcanic islands were on of the stops made by Charles Darwin in 1835, as a part of his trip aboard the Beagle, the time when he is generally considered to have formed his initial thoughts on the Theory of Evolution by Natural Selection. What was it about these tiny islands that inspired Darwin? Just how central were they to his formulation of the Theory? Are the Galapagos central to evolutionary theory in general? These are some of the questions we will address through our study of the historical aspects of the Galapagos. We will actually go to the Galapagos and see, firsthand, what all of the fuss is about. Biologists around the world comment that descriptions cannot do the locale justice. Armed with our new appreciation of the islands, we will tour several of the major islands. During tours on land and in the water, students will record their observations in writings and in pictures (much as Darwin did), and report on their observations and reactions to the rest of the class. Students will be expected to complete frequent individual responses to writings and discussions, as well as exercises in observation/documentation. Students will also prepare written and oral topics by researching the topics in somewhat more depth than the rest. Finally, students will prepare a more formal written account of their experiences and observations on the Islands, and present this upon their return. No academic prerequisites. Students must, however, be comfortable on and in the ocean and on a boat for several days at a time. Students must be able to handle several hours of moderate-to-high physical activity (mostly walking over very uneven ground, some hiking and swimming) daily.

For more information on program costs and how to apply for the program, paste this URL into your web browser:

https://depauw-horizons.symplicity.com/index.php?s=programs

Enter "Winter" into the Term search box.


Alexander Komives,
Matt Hertenstein

UNIV 183IH: Scientific Revolutions: Historical and Cultural Context (off-campus)

This course will expose students to the historical and cultural roots of some of the most important and revolutionary ideas in science that continue to influence our lives today. Some of the foci of the course constitute paradigm shifts in that they changed the underlying assumptions we have in our understanding of the natural world. Other foci of the course do not necessarily constitute paradigm shifts, but rather are examples of how scientific discoveries profoundly influence how we see ourselves in the world. The course will take place in London with day trips to Oxford University, Cambridge University, Darwin's Down House, and Stonehenge.

We will meet to discuss the people and ideas linked with the scientific and cultural sites, as well as visit academic centers and hear from experts about important historical influences. We'll examine the influence of Charles Darwin, Isaac Newton, Francis Crick and James Watson, and Rosalind Franklin. We will visit the Greenwich Observatory, Westminster Abbey, St. Paul's Cathedral, the National Gallery of Art, the Freud Museum, and the Tower of London, among others. This course will present some of the most important scientific discoveries in history and the people who brought them about.

For more information on program costs and how to apply for the program, paste this URL into your web browser:

https://depauw-horizons.symplicity.com/index.php?s=programs

Enter "Winter" into the Term search box.


Anne Moelk,
Cori Rees

UNIV 183IM: Women's Lacrosse WT 2023: Colombia with Lacrosse the Nations (off-campus)

The objective of our service trip is to provide an immersive experience to coaches and players while using our sport to positively impact the communities served by Lacrosse the Nations in Central and South America. During the trip, players and coaches will complete a service project, assist with an after-school lacrosse program, learn how sports play an active role in achieving the UN's Sustainable Development Goals and experience a new culture.  

The team will also be given time and field space for their own practices before the formal programming. Beyond lacrosse and service, the group will experience a variety of excursions including hikes, a trip to Villa de Leyva, and a day in the heart of Bogota (Colombia's Capital). The DePauw team with compete against the Colombian Women's National Lacrosse team while in the country. Prerequisite: Recruited women¿s lacrosse student athlete.

For more information on program costs and how to apply for the program, paste this URL into your web browser:

https://depauw-horizons.symplicity.com/index.php?s=programs

Enter "Winter" into the Term search box.