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DePauw Theatre

2018-19 Season

 

Sister Act
TICKETS AVAILABLE NOW
Thursday, September 27 Get Tickets Now
Friday, September 28 Get Tickets Now
Saturday, September 29 Get Tickets Now
Sunday, September 30 Get Tickets Now

SISTER ACT

DIRECTED BY SUSAN ANTHONY
MUSICAL DIRECTION BY STEVEN LINVILLE '06
CHOREOGRAPHY BY JARED NORMAN '12
SEPT. 27-29 | 7:30 P.M.
SEPT. 30 | 1 P.M.

Sister Act, the “feel-good, musical comedy smash” opens with Deloris Van Cartier, unsuccessful wannabe nightclub singer, witnessing a murder. When Deloris unexpectedly sees her married gangster lover Curtis shoot a man, she must run for her life before he is able to silence her. The police decide to hide her in the very last place anyone would think of looking:  a convent.

Deloris, now Sister Mary Clarence, must give up her flashy outfits, cigarettes, and liquor but she gains so much more as she learns to appreciate the enthusiasm and courage of the Sisters. Share the excitement as Deloris turns the sad, off-key choir into a joyous, inclusive, and highly lucrative Philadelphia sensation, which attracts international attention but also puts the lives of Deloris – and the Sisters – in jeopardy.

Nominated for five Tony awards, Sister Act features an exuberant mix of music ranging from Motown, soul, and disco to poignant ballads and transcendent hymns, all designed to celebrate music’s ability to change lives and bring together different communities.  Join the sisters and make a joyful noise!


Plays by Latina and African American Women
TICKETS AVAILABLE NOW
Thursday, November 15 Get Tickets Now
Friday, November 16 Get Tickets Now
Saturday, November 17 Get Tickets Now
Sunday, November 18 Get Tickets Now

PLAYS BY LATINA AND AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN

Poof! by Lynn Nottage
She Talks to Beethoven by Adrienne Kennedy
Personal Effects by Griselda Gambaro
Springtime by Maria Irene Fornes

DIRECTED BY TIM GOOD

NOV. 15-17 | 7:30 P.M.
NOV. 18 | 1 P.M. 

Spontaneous combustion.  A mountain of suitcases. Beethoven in Ghana.  Intersections of Poverty/Homophobia/Illness. Four extraordinary playwrights directly confront the deeper issues of our time, creating a performance full of humanity, fierce love, and courage.  The plays are: Poof! by two-time Pulitzer Prize winner Lynn Nottage, Springtime by nine-time Obie Award winner Marie Irene Fornes, She Talks to Beethoven by Obie Lifetime Achievement Award winner Adrienne Kennedy, and Personal Effects by Argentinian Guggenheim Fellow Griselda Gambaro.


DePauw One Acts
TICKETS AVAILABLE NOW
Thursday, March 7 Get Tickets Now
Friday, March 8 Get Tickets Now
Saturday, March 9 Get Tickets Now
Sunday, March 10 Get Tickets Now

DEPAUW ONE ACTS

DIRECTED BY STEVE TIMM

MARCH 7-9| 7:30 P.M.
MARCH 10 | 1 P.M.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Trojan Women
TICKETS AVAILABLE NOW
Thursday, April 11 Get Tickets Now
Friday, April 12 Get Tickets Now
Saturday, April 13 Get Tickets Now
Sunday, April 14 Get Tickets Now

TROJAN WOMEN

DIRECTED BY CAROLINE GOOD

APRIL 11-13 | 7:30 P.M.
APRIL 14 | 1 P.M.

Euripides’ Trojan Women is the one of the greatest anti-war plays ever written.  It depicts the suffering of women and children after every war.  It has been used many times to protest against war and to act as a warning for audiences who see it.  It can also be a consolation for those who are suffering, because in it they see that over the ages, others too have suffered.  In our moment in time when war should be obsolete, it is a time filled with perpetual war, fueled by a hunger for power, and yet rather than spreading democracy, the tragedy of displacement, death, and destruction is spread and must be endured by those current victims of war, just like the Trojan women.  In contrast to the grief of the women, the barbarism of the so-called civilized Greeks is an indictment of all imperialists. Hence, the unfortunate relevance today of this story that was written over 2,000 years ago.

This play has something for everyone: gods appear at the beginning; soldiers collect their loot after battle; a chorus of women suffer the worst they can suffer: the loss of their city, their men, and their children; a comic interlude between a femme fatale and her husband whom she deserted; and then darkness again, before the play ends with a faint ray of hope in the human spirit.


SPRING SPECTACLE OF SHAKESPEARESpring Spectacle of Shakespeare

DIRECTED BY SHAKESPEARE IN THE SCHOOLS STUDENTS
PROGRAM DIRECTOR AND INSTRUCTOR OF SHAKESPEARE IN THE SCHOOLS COURSE, GIGI JENNEWEIN

SATURDAY, MAY 4

Cloverdale Schools
South Putnam Schools
North Putnam Schools
Greencastle High School

In its 8th year, the Spring Spectacle is a partnership between DePauw University and Putnam County schools. The program trains DPU students to direct local middle and high school students in the mounting of fully staged 90-minute Shakespeare plays. The Spring Spectacle is inspired by and produced in association with Shakespeare & Company in Lenox, MA.