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Current Exhibits

Each year, the Peeler Art Center gallery program presents a wide range of exhibitions and related programming. From traveling exhibitions of national and international significance to shows featuring the work of current students, faculty, and alumni, the gallery program strives to offer a dynamic schedule of interdisciplinary visual experiences.

stereotype

FEBRUARY 8 – MAY 12, 2016

Peeler Art Center, University Gallery (lower level)

Historically, typography has been designed with two axes in mind, x and y. Today, in contrast, designers are broadening their perceptions about type to accommodate the added dimensions of a digital experiential world. Recent innovations in type design take principles of animation, interactivity, and kinetic movement and combine them with traditional components of typography, resulting in pioneering explorations in motion typography.

This activity made possible, in part, with support from the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency. Additional funding provided by the Public Occasions Committee.

 

ANNUAL JURIED STUDENT EXHIBITION

FEBRUARY 4 – MARCH 2, 2016

Peeler Art Center, Visual Arts Gallery

The Annual Juried Student Art Exhibition features works created by current DePauw students enrolled in studio art courses.  This year's exhibition will be juried by Dr. William V. Ganis, Chairperson, Department of Art and Design at Indiana State University.

 

Chairman Mao is the red sun in our hearts
Lithograph on paper
2013.1.2

THE RED SUN IN OUR HEARTS

FEBRUARY 1 – MAY 12, 2016

Peeler Art Center, University Gallery (upper level)

Drawn exclusively from the DePauw University Permanent Art Collection, The Red Sun in Our Hearts surveys the mid-20th century Socialist Realism art movement from mainland China. Throughout the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution of the 1960s, nearly everything from the visual arts and literature to music and theatrical production was created under the watchful eye of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP). Socialist Realism rejected classical Chinese design elements and Western abstraction in favor of Soviet-inspired aesthetics and function. The CCP printed millions of political posters for decades, covering a wide range of social, economic, and political themes. This exhibition features 38 original political posters as well as stamps, film, and objects from the Cultural Revolution. 

 

Shidzuo Iikubo '23 Gallery of Asian Art

Galleries at Emison
Emison Building
DePauw University
204 East Seminary Street

Greencastle, IN 46135

P: 765-658-4336

Gallery Hours:


Monday - Friday: 8 am - 5pm

Saturday: 8 am - noon

Sunday: Closed

Highlights from the Arthur E. Klauser '45 Asian and World Community Collection

semi-permanent display

Emison Building (Office of Admission), Shidzuo Iikubo '23 Gallery of Asian Art

In 1991, DePauw received the Arthur E. Klauser '45 Asian and World Community Collection. The gift included Buddhist art, notably icons and mandalas, objects related to Japanese noh theater and samurai culture, painted screens, and woodblock prints from the 18th and 19th centuries. Selected objects from this collection are currently displayed in the Shidzuo Iikubo Gallery, a dedicated exhibition space for Asian art. The gallery was  generously funded by Hirotsugu "Chuck" Iikubo '57 in honor of his father, Shidzuo Iikubo, a graduate of the Class of 1923.

A website was developed for the Shidzuo Iikubo '23 Gallery by a DePauw winter term class in 2013. The course, co-taught by Professor Ota and Craig Hadley, resulted in new interpretive text panels and a guided audio tour. Click here to visit the website.

 

Ethnographic Gallery of African, Peruvian, and Oceanic Art

Galleries at Emison
Emison Building
DePauw University
204 East Seminary Street

Greencastle, IN 46135

P: 765-658-4336

Gallery Hours:


Monday - Friday: 8 am - 5pm

Saturday: 8 am - noon

Sunday: Closed

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE ethnographic art collections

SEMI-PERMANENT DISPLAY

Emison Building (Office of Admission), 

The ethnographic gallery is dedicated to displaying anthropological objects from the University’s permanent art collection. Highlights of the extensive holdings in this area include African sculpture from the Vandiver-Haimann Collection of African Art, donated to the University by Theo and Ruth Haimann, Audrey L. Levin, and Thomas K. Vandiver ’73 and Carolyn Vandiver. The University’s collection of African art also contains Kuba textiles given by Dr. Steven G. Conant ’71.  A small selection of ancient Peruvian ceramics and textiles, donated by Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Jennings, includes vessels from the Chavín, Moche, and Chimú cultures, as well as Chancay textiles and masks.